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CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Alto in Cr«l Britain. United States. West India*. South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE-METAL 

A \STeeKly Newspaper devoted to tHe Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVIII. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 6, 1906 



NO. 1. 




CARVERS 
CASED GOODS 
TABLE CUTLERY 



BUTCHERS 
HUNTING! 5. 
POCKET KNIVES 




FOR SALE BY LEADINQ WHOLESALE HOUSES 




CANADA 



MORE POPULAR 

THAN EVER 



after forty years' trial. 



WHY? 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited. Makers, 
BRISTOL, ENG. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
Managers Canadian Branca. 





You are Just as Sure 

to find efficiency and appearance in 

SOVEREIGN 
RADIATORS 



as you are sure to find the latest improvements, the 
newest designs. 

Sovereign Radiators are distinctly a Taylor-Forbes 
product. They are not like the radiators you used to 
handle. They are like the radiators that you have 
long* wished to handle— the best. 

Order "Sovereigns" and trade is assured. 

Our King St. West Branch, Toronto, has a stock of 
Sovereign Radiators which can be shipped on short 
notice. 



Taylor- Forbes Company, 



Limil.a 



TORONTO 
21 Richmond St. IV. 



Head Office and Works : 
GUELPH 



MONTREAL 
9 De Bresoies St. 



See Classified U*t of Advertisement* on Page 67. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



PIPE 



AND 



STEAM-FITTERS 

— TOOLS= 



he j UftNfiD 



6? 



CHA1IS PIPE TONGS 



rURNE 




^ y V f t : i 

|,S & . PIPE VISE 



P 
I 

P 



E 




ft^fc 



P/PE STOCKS ^d DIES 
AND 



RE 





PIPE CUTTER 



PIPE-THREADING 
MACHINE 




JAN -6 

PIPE WRENCH 






ROLLER PIPE CUTTER 



THREE-WHEEL PIPE CUTTER 



WRITE F-OFR PRICES 



RICE LEWIS 




SON 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PERFORATED 
SHEET METALS 



IN 



Brass, Copper, Steel, Etc. 

All sizes of perforations and 
thickness of metals for 

Miners' Use, 

Grain Cleaning Machinery, 

Bee Keepers, 

Malt Kiln Floors, Etc. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, P.Q 



Browning Automatic Shot Gun 

Also 

Full line of Single and Double- 
Barrel Breech Loading Guns, 

Winchester, Savage and Marlin 
Sporting Rifles 

in all models. 

Shot and Ball Cartridges 

in 

Smokeless and Black Powder. 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMITED 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF HARDWARE 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



-'- 






'GEM" 



BLIZZARD' 






TUP R£QT IPC PDEAIU! CDCC7CDQ in Practical use, because convenient 
Hit DCO I IOC UnCMIfl I flLt it nO compact in size, use smallest amount of 
tee and gait, run easily, freeze quickly, produce smoothly frozen creams or desserts 
with little bother and less work. 

THE ONLY FREBZBRS nADE having Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms, Automatic Tin Scrapers 



II 



AMERICAN" 

TWIN FREEZERS 



(2 in I) 



Freezes two flavors of Ice Cream or an Ice or Sherbet 
and Ice Cream at one and same time, In one Freezer 
Something' entirely new. Never done before. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR THEM. 
SEND FOR NEW FREEZER BOOK. 

NORTH BROS. iBFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




'LIGHTNING 



'CROWN 



ICE CHIPPER8 



"CEM" 
ICE SHAVE 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



Davidson's Milk Can Trimmings 




IN COMPLETE SETS 

"Broad Hoop" Pattern — Com- 
posed of the following : 1 Broad 
Hoop Bottom, 1 Cover. 1 Centre 

Hoop li inches ^ide. 30 gauge, 1 
Broad Top Hoop, 1 pair Cover 
Handles, 1 p.iir Side Handles. 



and Milk Cans with Broad Hoop 
Patent Roll Rim Bottoms 

are in great demand and their 
general popularity is increasing 

yearly. 

They give satisfaction to risers 
and dealers alike. 



IMPORTANT 

The best mechanical skill ob- 
tainable is utilized to make David- 
son's Milk Can Trimmings perfect 
in even the smallest details. 

Write for Price List. 




Heavy Rolled Edffcs make our PATENT Bottoms doubly 
durable and wayjron and factor)- Boor protectors. 



Some customers do not like to send 
us small orders. That's a mistake. 

We take them, large or smail. We 
are waiting for your order now. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

Montreal and Winnipeg 



t 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 

have removed their offices and 
warehouse to 54-56-58 Front West. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



IM 



EigWsh Hom©-!6 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




NO DOUBT 
ABOUT IT 

No doubt you know a good pipe 
wrench when you see one, just 
as well as we do. The question is, 
have you seen these ? They're a 
fine lot, but take a look at the 
variety shown in our 1,000 page 
catalogue No. 31. We have just 
about the largest and best assort- 
ment in Canada to choose from ; 
all money makers. 

When you begin to get interest- 
ed, ask our prices. That's where 
we shine. 





RETURN" 1 



Monkey Wrench Pipe Jaws 

No. 1. For any wrench from 16 to 26 inches. 

No. 2. " " " up to 16 inch. 

High grade tool steel. Converts the ordinary wrench into a pipe 

wrench. 




RETURNED 



No. 45— Comb 



.»«.•« nW'w, 



d Pipe 



Bright finish. Head and bar are all one piece forging. Long 
Nut, 10 to 18 inches, for pipe from 14 to 3 in. 



BETONEW 



Cut B.-ok No 

Page No 




-J 



\jj&.£ Westcott Adjustable "S." 

Steel Jaws. Releases quickly and has a 
firm grip. 6 to 14 inch; for pipe from V& 
to \y<i inch. 




No. 44— Short Nut 

Black finish. 10 to 15 inches. For pipe from 14 to 2V4. inches. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



Have you ever tried the "CUTWELL" Razor, manufactured by the celebrated firm of J. A. Henckels, 
Twinworks, Solingen, Cermany ? It is to-day the leader in the Canadian market. Your stock is 
not complete without it. 




Always ready for use. Every razor guaranteed With ordinary care will keep an edge for years without honing 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADINC 
WHOLESALE H0U8ES 



F. W. LAMPLOUCH & CO., Montreal 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

21 State Street. 



Montreal 

Bank of Ottawa Building. 



Chicago 

The Rookery. 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 

I 

JOHN ROUND ®, SON, Limited 



Manufacturing 



** 



xS -5tRtDTRADf ^ 



GOLDSMITHS and SILVERSMITHS m(iQ g 



Contractors to 
H. M. ADMIRALTY & WAR OFFICE 




€B>G@0 



Tudor Works : 
SHEFFIELD, England 

and 
112 HATTON GARDEN, LONDON 



ESTABLI SHED 1847 
Manufacturers of all Kinds of- 



GOLD, SILVER, ELECTRO PLATE ON 
NICKEL and BRITANNIA METAL GOODS, 
SILVER and PLATED CUTLERY, STEEL 
CUTLERY, OAK and INLAID GOODS 

WITH SILVER AND PLATED MOUNTS 



Our Manufactures have a world-wide repu- 
tation of over 50 years' standing. We are 
the largest makers of spoons in the world. 

We want to mail our Catalogues to all Canadian 
Dealers, will YOU send us YOUR name ? 



HOTEL and SHIP'S OUTFITS, special goods for hard 
wear. Special designs for all purposes sup- 
plied free. 

WHATEVER YOUR REQUIREMENTS ARE DROP US A LINE 



Showrooms and Warehouses : - Coristilie Building, MONTREAL 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have You Seen Them ? 

For Beauty, Finish and Quality, the 
"Maple Leaf Harvest Tools are unexcelled. 




No. 122. Manure ForK 





No. 243. Beat ForK 




No. 108. Hay ForK 



jC5s-«r" ■•^""' 1 ' k --- 




TO THE HARDWARE TRADE 



No 43. Patent V. Blade H< 



When placing your order for harvest tools with your jobber it will be to your advantage 
to specify for the "Maple Leaf "Harvest Tools. Should your jobber be unable to supply 
them, send your order to us and it will receive prompt and careful attention. 

The Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Limited, Tillsonburg, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 




Pi|\lr*C MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 

THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 

Zealand, Australia, Etc. 
We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Round Bill Peavys, Handled in Split Maple 
Pink's Duck Bill Winter Cant Hooks, Handled in 

Split Maple. 
Finest Quality Split Maple Cant Hook and Peavy 

Handles, Car Load or Dozen. 

Boom Chains, Pike Poles, Skidding Tongs, Boat 
Winches, etc. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail 
Hardware Merchants. 

I Can Furnish You with the 

Brazil Patent Snow Plough and Road Maker; 
also The DesJardin Patent Log Sleighs 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



THOMAS PINK & CO., Pembroke, Ont, Canada l K 



Distance 
Phono No. 87 



John Summers & Sons, Limited 



Hawartien Bridge Works, 
Shotton, Flintshire, England 




These two Works cover more than 50 acres. Our output of Galvanized Sheets exceeds 2,000 tons weekly, and we employ over 2,500 men. 




LARGEST 
MAKERS 
OF 



GALVANIZED SHEETS 

<— — IN ENGLAND 

One year's production from these works 
V, ND M^< would put a girdle of Galvanized Sheets 

^^ST B^ right around the earth. 

Agent: F. Hankin, Montreal 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



1 ^^^^^^^^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^ ♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦$♦^♦^♦^♦^♦$4$ 

Don't Be Downcast! 

rerliaps the figures of your recent stock-taking did not show as good a 
result in profits from laSt year's trade as you expected. 

Don't be downcast, take heart, every road has a turning, and perhaps 
this year will be better than former ones. 

With energy, foresight and skill in buying your goods and managing 
your business you will succeed. Everyone has the elements of success within 
him. No live man is ever completely "down and out." Don't funk. Keep at it. 
We would like to see you succeed, and will do ouf part. 

We will always try to sell you hardware at fair prices, and the hardware will always be worth the price. No 
boasting about that — just straight-forward principle. 

We will post you promptly on all the newest goods. Novelties of merit are always profitable. 

We will ship your orders promptly and in such a shape that you will receive your hardware in good condition. 

Don't be downcast ! 

Try trading with us during 1906 and see if you don't make money. 




Frothingham & Workman, Limited 

Wholesale Hardware and Iron Merchants 

founded 1809 MONTREAL, CANADA 




Here Is A. Seller! 

You can sell a pair of S. & S. Cogged Scissors to 
every one in your town who works with such materials as 
leather, rubber, packing;, linoleum and asbestos. 

The lower blade is cogged, thus holding the material 
in place for the sharp upper blade to cut it. 



Canadian Agents 



McLKAN S SOPHUS, 30! St. James Street, MONTREAL 




QUALITY COUNTS 




That's why there are more "EAGLE MOP 
WRINGERS AND BUCKETS COMBINED" sold than 
any other make. 

Are made right in every particular. 
Made to give perfect service and long wear. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER OR WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

EAGLE COOPERAGE WORKS 

CIRCLEVILLE, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Sole Manufacturers. 



, 



HARDWARE AND METAL January 6, 1906 



$ 75.000 00$ 



■WORTH OF- 



Hardware 



A T 



Startling Prices 

Have you seen our JOD \Jl\CCt* 

(Prices Quoted Net) 
IF NOT— 

Write at Once 

We are cleaning out stocK preparatory to 
issuing a new catalogue. 

All goods guaranteed to be in perfect 

condition. 

WATCH FOR OUR NEW CATALOGUE 

The Hobbs Hardware Company 

Limited 

LONDON 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALS 



BAR IRON AND STEEL 

GALVANIZED SHEET IRON 
BLACK SHEET IRON 
CANADA PLATES 

Tin, Lead and Zinc 

WIRE OF ALL KINDS 

Pipe, Valves and Fittings 



RAILWAY SUPPLIES 

SHOVELS AND PICKS 
WHEELBARROWS 

CHAIN 

Crowbars, Jacks, Hammers 

ANVILS AND VISES 

PULLEY BLOCKS, ETC 



Telegraph, Telephone or Mail Orders shipped quick and 
billed at lowest prices. 



MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



atsa 



HARDWARE AND METAL January 6, 1906 

♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ 
♦ 



♦ 
♦ 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



♦ 
♦ 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



We manufacture Cordage and Binder Twine of every variety. 
We solicit your 1906 business for the following brands: 

Blue Ribbon, 650 ft. per lb. 
Red Cap, 600 " 

Tiger, 550 " 

Standard, 500 " 

Golden Crown, 500 " 

Consumers Cordage Co., 



MILLS: HONTREAL and HALIFAX 



Limited 



BRANCHES : 



W. A. C. HAMILTON, 11 Front Street East, Toronto, Ont.; F. H. ANDREWS & SON, Quebec, P.Q.; 

MacGOWAN & CO., Vancouver, B.C.; CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited, St. John, N.B.; GEO. WOOD, London, Eng. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg Distributors of our Binder Twine for Northwest. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




Style 



The Very Newest 

Combination, Bow Lever and Side Pedal drive ; oper- 
ated from a sitting or standing position. Bicycle Ball 
Bearings. Very easy running. Barrel quickly detachable 
from frame. 



The Best Ever 

Easiest running and highest 
grade Rotary Washer made. 

Test proves best. Try it and 
profit. Nothing like it on the 
market. 

Gears enclosed. Impossible for 
children to get their fingers caught. 



THESE ARE TRADE BRIISGERS 




THE "SNOWBALL 



Made solely by 



W L "S & S ° N ' THE D0WSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

Eastern Agents HAMILTON, - ONTARIO 



10 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Established 1774 



Established 1774 



We are "old" in experience, "young" in method. We rivet our 
attention on "make" and "material,'' the combination that 
produces the unrivalled 

SPEAR & JACKSON HANDSAWS 




Our Circular Saws, too, are made in a "telling" way, in all sizes 
and for all purposes. We'll stand comparison on the price ques- 
tion. Look into our goods. Correspondence with this h use 
will benefit you — your business. 

SPEAR & JACKSON S Sheffield, England 

Telegraphic address,: "Spear, Sheffield" 



&/>e BEST EQUIPPED FACTORY, 
67>e BEST ADVERTISED PRODUCT 

We make a few articles, in large quantities, make them better 
than anyone else does, and we tell everybody about them. 

We know we have the right principle in our "one-motion" Peerless 
Iceland Freezer and we've put up a new factory adequately equipped for turn- 
ing out this freezer in great numbers. 




Peer/ess Ice/and Freezer 



Our advertising — covering every bit of freezer-selling territory in the United States 
to Peerless Iceland sales. 



Every woman in the country interested in her home knows about the Peerless Iceland and believes in it 
cook likes" — the freezer the housekeeper wants when she goes into your store. 



gives an impulse, as strong as 
It's "the 



it is steady, 
freezer the 



Dana fee/ess 
Refrigerator 

For the window. No ice Kill. A refriger- 
ator that takes up no floor space and is run 
without ice eight months in the year. 




Dana Mop Wringer 

wrings the mop dry in five seconds. You stand in a natural position — 
both feet rest firmly on the floor. 

Tub is well made, very strong and extra braced with heavy, flat iron, 
rust-proof hoops. The rollers are of solid maple and never stick. The 
latest, the simplest and the best mop wringer on the market. 

The Dana plant is fire-proof; we can guarantee delivery as promised. 
Everything about it is modern — selling organization and all. 

Both jobber and dealer make a good profit on (he Dana line. 

Your jobber will be around soon. Ask him 



10 WARREN STREET 
t EW YORK 



THE DANA MFC. CO., cincinatti 




ii 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 




WATERPROOF WRAPPING PAPER 

For Express and Long Distance Packages. Put up In rolli 36 in. wide, 250 
and 300 yards in a roll. Clean paper on both sides— waterproof substance 
in the centre— therefore It will not soil or stain delicate goods, as ordinary 
waterproof paper will. Practically odorless. May be used either for case 
.lining or wrapping packages. CANADA p APER C Q. 



SAMPl RS AND PRICES WITH PLEASURE. 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 





&Z£~iJsg&£ 




gLEC I ttlCl 1 Y SIMPLIFIED 


IsMfSs 




By Prof. T. O'Connor Sloane. 

This work is the simplest ever published on the subject of Electricity, and 
does something not hitherto accomplished. The object of " Electricity Simpli- 
fied " is to make the subject as plain as possible, and to show what the modern 
conception of electricity is ; to show how two plates of different metals immersed 
in acid can send a message around the globe ; to explain how a bundle of copper 
wire rotated by a steam engine can be the agent in lighting our streets ; co tell 
what the volt, ohm and ampere are, and what high and low tension mean , and 
to answer the Questions that perpetually arise in the mind in this age of electricity 

158 Pages. Fully Illustrated. - • Price, $1 00. 

THfcS MacL.KAX PUB. CO., - TORONTO 


SLQANfc 








ESTABLISHED 1867 

J. S. LOUGHEAD & SON, Sarnia, Ont. 

Mfrs. of Hubs, Spokes, Buggy and Waggon Rims, Sleigh Runners, 
Shafts and Poles, etc. 

We use nothing but the very best Hickory and Oak in our stock, 
and we are prepared to guarantee all of our goods. We carry an 

exceedingly large stock on hand 
and will ship promptly. 



Your Order Solicited. 

Quebfx Agent:— J. A. BERNARD, 
21 St. Peter St., Quebec, P.Q. 



Deal^s-olr'tLABROUGH" 

SHOT GUNS for next Season's Trade 



THEY SHOOT WELL ! 

THEY SELL WELL ! 

THE PROFITS ARE RIGHT ! 

Sole Manufacturers — 

J. P. CLABROUCH & JOHNSTONE 

WORKS- 

Price Street, BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 




Capital and Burp] us, tl, 500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Hob. 346 and 348 Broadway, Hew York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every 6ee«er o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporation*, 
Specific term* may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of it* office*. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, n a. 

OTTAWA, ONT. 
VAKOOOVKR. B.Q. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QCKBEC, QDK. 



LONDON, ONT. 
8T. JOHN, N.B, 
WINNIPEG, MA1». 



MONTREAL, QUI. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gea, Naa. Wetter. Ctuda. Toroito. 



If it's money you want, we can put you on the 
right road. Our 



Feed Boiler 

and 

Crescent 

Steel Sled 

Circulars 

are well worthy your 
consideration. Write 



JAMES & REID, Perth, Ont. 
The Largest Manufacturers of Feed Boilers in Canada 




TRADE WITH ENGLAND 

Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address Is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, $4.80,) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 




Solarine Metal Polish 

Makes a brilliant shine quick that lasts. 

Raven Harness Composition 

Produces a jet black polish on leather 

Falcon Enamel Top Dressing 

Will not chip. Dries in 8 to 10 hours. 

H. F. FALKINER, 

Wholesale Harness, Hardware and Supplies 
eo George 8t., TORONTO 



H. G. EADIE 

22 St. John St., - Montreal 

Manufacturer's Agent, Hardware and Metal Merchant 

Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence Invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. Representing 
now 

LEEDS FIRE CLAY CO., Lt'd. 

Fire Bricks, Clazed Bricks, Stable Bricks. 

T. JO WITT & SONS, SHEFFIELD. 

Files, Cast Steel, Hammers, Crucible Steel Wire. 

JOS. FENTON & SONS, SHEFFIELD 

Cutlery and Plated Ware. 

Agent for 

Norway Iron, Steel, Calvanized Iron, Chains, 

Sheet Iron, Hoop Iron, Machinery 

Steel, PEN-DAR Metal Lockers. 




Iron Roof 
*]f^ Cresting 

Finials 



Iron 
Fencing 



DENNIS WIRE AND IRON CO. 

Send for Catalogue, LONDON, ONT. 



12 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

NO. 233. WILCOX TACKLE-BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 



THIS IS THE 

OLD STAND-BY 

None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 
If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. 

WILCOX 1VIF"0. OO. OF" ONTARIO, Limited, London, Ont. 




Your Reputation 



r 






Is your most valuable asset. You make your 

reputation by the quality of the goods you sell 

and by satisfying your customers. When you 

sell an Atkins Silver Steel Saw you can depend 

upon hearing from it in a most agreeable way 

and you take no chances of jeopardizing your reputation. The sale of one Atkins Saw leads to another and so on indefinitely. 

They are a splendid line to handle. Catalog and discounts on application. 




C Q ATKINS & CO Leading Saw and Tool Manufacturers 

Factories and Home Office . . . 



INCORPORATED 
CANADIAN BRANCH s 56 King St. E., Toronto, Can. 



Indianapolis, Ind., U.S.A. 



NORTHWESTERN BRANCH: Minneapolis, Minn. 




IMPROVED CARPENTERS 
TOOLS 



Sold by all Hardware 
Dealers 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO 



NEW BRITAIN., Conn., U.S.A. 



IRONSIDE FOR IRON 

xsrr?tV^.%v:s iron, steel, metals, bars, plates, 

SHEETS. BOLTS and NUTS, TIN PLATES, Etc. 

Sole Licensees for PAGE'S PATENT WIRE STRETCHER, and we 

are willing to sell the right of manufacture in Canada on a Royalty basis. 

IRONSIDE'S PATENT WIRE CUTTERS. ■«»»*« t. «.< «, w*. 

Wo publUh a "Canadian M.tal "Vleo List" monthly. Quotations In Dollars and Cants. 
(C.I.F.) Wo will sond this, and our " Wookly Markat Report" on rooolpt of address. 

IRONSIDE, SON & CO., Mft* London. Eng 

Sole Agent for Canada : MR. 8VDNEY T. H ACKETT. 233 St. James St. Montreal. 

13 



TKe FisHer 
Tube SKate 




Y Tube Hockey 

Skate ' 



STRONG 



Dealers 



LIGHT 



NEAT 



DON'T MISS BUSINESS. You may not 
have stocked our skates. 

We have provided for the rush season. 

WE CARRY FULL LINE OF SHOES 
with our patent hook. We can give mail orders 
quick despatch. 

Skates attached to shoes complete. 

When ordering state size of shoe usually 
worn. 

THE A. D. FISHER CO.Limitea 

34 Richmond Street East 
TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 




.«w^ 




This ad. is worth 50c. 



5,000 REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE 

DIVINE'S RED DEVIL 
FAUCET WATER MOTOR 

Will grind an axe on 20 lbs. pressure. 

THREE TIMES THE POWER OF 
ANY OTHER FAUCET MOTOR 

IVui-r for sewing machines, lathes, 
scroll saws and other small machines. 

For grinding edge tools and polish- 
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1 horse power on 80 lbs. pressure, 
attached to any faucet. 

Price, COMPLETE, including emery, buf- 
fing and pulley wheels, polishing 
composition i etc., $4.00. 

$3-50 and this ad. will get the motor 
complete. 

DISCOUNT TO THE TKAPK. 

Divine Water Motor Co. 

296 Broadway, New York 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Stude 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuta of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 




Ahead of all others in quality and workmanship. If sparks of fine quality, set 
by experts, are what you require, buy Diamonds of A. Shaw & Son's make. 
Canadian Agent 

GODFREY S. F»El_TOIM 

388 ST. PAUL ST., MONTREAL 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

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HAVE REEN THE 

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Each pair of our Bheara buara tho aliovu trade mark, 



Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS 
ur.d TAILORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 




Henry T. Seymour Shear Company 

WIEBUSCH & HILOER, Limited, NEW YORK, Solo Aganta 

16 



SEYMOUR 
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TRAKK MARK 



Latest C'ata 
loguo will l>e 

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Perfectly Flat Galvanized Sheets 

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Sold by all jobbers who are up-to-date. 

It sells readily. Is selected cartfully ; soft and 
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MAKERS : 

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Bolton, Fane & Go. 

98 Leadenhall Street, London, E.G., Eng. 

TINPLATES 



In all qualities and sizes 



Bessemer Coke 
Selmens Coke 
Charcoal - 
Best Charcoal 
Staffordshire Bar Iron 



" Lofoden " Brand 

" Pelican " Brand 

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1 Cardigan " Crown Brand 

B.G. Crown Brand 



Calvanized Sheets "Pelican" and "Ostrich" Brand 

Boiler Plates, Rails, Fishplates, &c, &c. 
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Selling Agent for Canada, 210 St. James St., MONTREAL 

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mm 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

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Maple Leaf 

Stitched Cotton Duck 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co. Ltd 4 

Hamilton Canada 



January 6. 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A WORK INDISPENSABLE TO EVERY OFFICE 



1. Consuls of Foreign States 
in London. 

Consuls of Foreign States in 
Provinces. 
English Consuls abroad. 

2. Chambers of Commerce 
In United Kingdom. 

. Chambers of Commerce in 
Colonies. 

3. Customs Tariff of the 
United Kingdom. 

4. Lloyds Signal Stations in 
the United Kingdom. 

Lloyds Agents throughout the 
world (revised by the Secre- 
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RELIABLE COMPACT EASY OF REFERENCE 

ABSOLUTELY UNSURPASSED FOR GETTING IN TOUCH WITH ALL SHIPPERS, MANUFACTURERS, ETC. 

Export Merchant Shippers 



OF 



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net 



GREAT BRITAIN 
AND IRELAND 



43rd Year 

of 

Publication. 



Date of publication of 1906 edition, FEBRUARY 28th 

London : THE CARTER PUBLISHING CO., - 8 New Bridge Street, E. C. 



5. Register of British and 
Foreign Shipping. 

6. Shipping and Forwarding 
Agents, Export Packers. Steam- 
ship Lines. 

7. Export Sections of Lon- 
don and Provinces (separate 
towns), giving names of ex- 
porters, places of shipment, 
and class of goods shipped. 

8. Index to Class of Goods 
Shipped with names of Ship- 
pers. 

9. Trade Mark Section. 

10. Manufacturers' Trade 
Directory (Buyers' Guide.) 





WHAT IT DOES 

(Continued) 








MAXimum LIGHT 

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is the only glass that when placed directly in the window sash can successfully produce daylight. At 
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Sole Canadian Agents : 

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Glass Importers and Manufacturers. 




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LLANELLY, WALES 



16 




HARDWARE AND METAL January 6, 1906 

A good resolution for the 
New Year — Handle Canadian 
goods when they deserve it. 

"DOMINION" 

cartridges and shot shells are 
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cheaper than imported makes, 
' on account of the duty. 



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16 



January 6, 1906 



Hardwire and Metal 



DANGERS OF LEAD POISONING 



By Robert Modler, in Chicago Tribune 



CONSIDERING the uncounted mil- 
lions of the world's population 
who in one way and another are 
subject to the dangers of lead poisoning 
in its many forms, no other industry in 
the world has carried with it the menace 
that comes with lead mining, lead 
smelting, and the manufacture and 
adaptation of lead products to their al- 
most illimitable uses in the arts and 
trades. 

When your attention has been called 
to some particular trade where the 
deaths from so-called "natural causes" 
are unusually high, it is almost a cer- 
tainty that lead poisoning in one degree 
or another will have entered into the 
causes of the abnormal mortality. Lead 
and lead products affect a dozen different 
trades in vital manner, and wherever the 
metal or its products are used there 
will its poisonous effects be marked in 
the death rolls of the workers. 

Looking over the dangers of some of 
the trades as compared with the farm- 
er's chance of life at his work, the poi- 
sonous effects of lead and its by-pro- 
ducts are emphasized in the ranks of the 
file maker who works by hand, in the 
lead workers in general, among the pot- 
ters and glaziers, among the glass cut- 
ters and zinc workers. The file maker, 
who makes his cuts into the steel with 
a chisel driven by a hard hammer, has 
one of the most dangerous occupations 
in the world, due wholly to lead poison- 
ing, which results from the slab of lead 
upon which the file rests as a base. 

Death Rate of Farmers and Metal 
"Workers. 

Farmers 602 

File workers 1,810 

Lead workers 1,783 

Potters and earthenware manufac- 
turers ....1,702 

Cutters 1,516 

Glass blowers and cutters 1.487 

Copper workers 1,381 

Iron and steel workers 1,301 

Zinc workers 1,198 

Stone quarriers 1,176 

Cotton mill workers 1,141 

Printers 1,096 

Coopers and wood turners 1,083 

Brick and stone masons 1,001 

Wool manufacturers 994 

Tinworkers 991 

Carpet weavers 973 

Rakers and confectioners 920 

Blacksmiths 914 

Out of the given numbers in compari- 
son three file workers die to every one 
death of a farmer. Onlv among the men 
who cut the French buhrstone for the 
grinding of grain does a greater death 
rate exist among the trades from the 
so-called "natural" causes. Close upon 
the death rate of the file maker, how- 
ever, is the mortality of the worker in 
the production of lead and its by-pro- 
ducts, while the potter, who uses the 
lead products in glazinc his wares, is a 
close competitor in the race with death. 

Lead poisoning as an economic factor 
in civilization is almost without end in 



its 'nearings. Not only does it affed the 
worker at times in horrible manner but 
his posterity are ils victims in almost 
more horrible possibilities. 

Eight Per Cent, are Poisoned. 

The "plumhism" of lead poisoning may 
be acute or chronic, according to cir- 
cumstances. At the best 8 per cent, of 
the workers in lead and with it in large 
quantities . may expect poisoning in 
marked degree. Lead becomes doubly 
dangerous for the reason that its poi- 
sonous salts have no unpleasant odor or 
taste. Now and then the individual is 
found who is virtually immune, at least 
until he discovers that he is not. These 
salts are easily soluble, and the onset 
of the trouble may be most insidious. 
In the case of chronic plumhism the vic- 
tim has an unnatural pallor, anaemia is 
marked in lips and gums, his features 
become altered and expressionless, a 
metallic taste develops in his mouth, 
making food intolerable in the morning, 
thus often forcing him to go to' work on 
an empty stomach, which in itself is a 
worst possible provocation. 

Under the influence of an acute attack 
of plumbism the victim may have to lie 
down and roll in the agony of abdominal 
pains. His pulse is slow and feeble ;, he 
suffers from sleeplessness, has a col- 
lapsed appearance, and wears an anxious 
look. One of these attacks leads to an- 
other, a blue line appears in the gums 
close to the line of the teeth, and after 
several of these attacks the victim may 
suffer both the "wrist drop" and the 
"ankle drop"— a painless hut total tem- 
porary paralysis of the ankles and 
wrists. In the worst forms these acute 
attacks are shown in convulsions that 
last two or three, days, when the pa- 
tient dies. If at the end of the third 
day the patient is alive he has a chance 
for life, though he may be blind for the 
rest of his life. 

In the case of a mother poisoned by 
lead her child dies soon after its birth 
in convulsions. Where both parents are 
poisoned children almost invariably are 
born dead. 

How Lead Slaughters Workers. 

When it is remembered that lead in 
almost any form is poisonous to this 
degree, and when the multitudinous 
forms are considered as menacing the 
world every day and every hour, one 
may be excused for wondering if the 
world were not better off without the 
metal. Yet were lead suddenlv to drop 
out of civilization the effect would be 
tremendous. 

These lead poisons get into the sys- 
tem through the fumes of melting lead 
and through the dusty particles that rise 
from its by-products ; they enter the 
system through the person's eating with 
unwashed hands and again through the 
skin itself, especially under the finarer 
nails. As to how poisonous some of the 
lead products may be, dogs that have 
slept upon the working clot lies of lead 
smelters have died from it, and some of 
the worst cases of lead poisoning among 

17 



women have come to laundresses from 
washing the clothes of lead workers. 

Printers' colic is one of Hie forms of 
lead poisoning which through improved 
printing methods is decreasing year by 
year. But it is a considerable economic, 
problem even now. Twelve per cent, ol 
those coming in touch with type metal 
in the printing trades may expect 1o 
feel "printers' colic" in the year. 'I 
will be in the proportion of ten com- 
positors, four operators of the linotype 
machine, and two slereotypers. Eating 
with unwashed hands is (he chief source 
of this poison, while the linotype opera 
tor gets it through the fumes of the 
metal and from the oxidized particles in 
the floor dust. 

Care Necessary to Save Lives. 

No one working in lead products in 
any form can afford to neglect every 
possible means of prevention of the poi- 
son. Clean hands, clean nails, pure air, 
a substantial diet, plenty of milk, and 
changes of clothing in order to prevent 
contamination from them are essential. 

Workers in dusty atmospheres, per- 
haps, are victims to disease and deatli 
almost in proportion to the lead work- 
ers. Everywhere that dust particles fly 
in a mill and shop the worker is a vic- 
tim in proportion as his work is dusty 
and the dust is poisonous within itself. 
Hundreds are victims of the poisonous 
lead dusts that fly from the enameling 
brushes and from the "putty pastes" of 
the glass polisher. But even the flour- 
dust of the miller once caused a death 
rate in the flour mills that was appall- 
ing. 

The match maker, working in the 
fumes of phosphorus, has his dangerous 
calling, and is subject to one of the 
worst forms of poisoning. The infection 
shows in a tooth, perhaps gradually in- 
fecting the jaw, which becomes inflamed 
and finally suppurative. If unchecked the 
disease spreads until the bone of the 
jaw dies and is destroyed. Coincident 
with this, too, other bones in the body 
are made more brittle and are more 
easily broken. 

Workers in mercury may have their 
miseries, as in the silvering of mirrors, 
for instance. Stomach trouble first de 
velops, then salivation, with loosening 
of the teeth and unusual flowing of sa- 
liva. Headaches follow, the tongue is 
tremulous, the skilled man especiallv he- 
comes nervous about his work, night- 
mare is frequent, and if the victim does 
not quit work his tremulousness spreads 
through his muscular system until he is 
disabled. 

"Brass ague" is one of the ugly ills 
of the brass founder and brass worker. 
Oddly enough, it does not affect the man 
who is steadily at the work. He must 
be a new man, or he must have laid off 
from his work for a period before he is 
a subject for the attack. 

"Brass ague" first leaves the victim 
languid and depressed. As it comes on 
he becomes chilled, his teeth chatter, a 
cold perspiration breaks out on his face 
and head, headache and nausea follow, 
then a period of burning fever, and not 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



until a period of vomiting has relieved 
the patient does ■ Milk is an 

antidote for tin- trouble. 

Rubber workers in the rulcanizin 
rubber by the use of bisulphide of car- 
bon are open to some of the worst pen- 
alties of poisons Paralysis of months' 
duration is possible. Drunkenness to all 
appearances marks the sufferer from the 
fumes of the bisulphide ; loss of appe- 
tite, emaciation, and blindness may fol- 
low Insanity and suicide by jumping 
from the windows of a factory are not 
a few incidents in the work. 

Buhrstone Grinders Soon Die. 

Among the "drv grinders" in metal 
work the death rate is heavy. The 
deaths in the l.oon grinders between the 
if 35 and 55 years are 458. as com- 
pared with the 261 deaths in the 1.000 
in all trades. 

The few men who are cutting buhr- 
es in spite of the new roller pro- 
- of the mills are the worst vic- 
tims of their occupations. This buhr- 
stone comes from the valley of the 
Seine. in Fiance, and is the hardest 
known stone. The worker becomes sub- 
tO the dust of the stone and the 
dust of the steel tools with which he 
works Hits of steel are shot into his 
arms until they are blue, and the par- 
licles of dust that get into his lungs 
leave him an average of twelve years 
working life, no matter at what age he 
begins. 

Diseases that kill among these world 
workers in all trades are interesting in 
their Doint of attack. In the following 
table tuberculosis is separate from di- 
seases of the respiratory organs in gen- 
eral, but either classification leads any 
other by long odds. 

Diseases That Kill— in the 1,000. 

Nervous system 82 

Tuberculosis 185 

Heart 126 

Respiratory organs 254 

Cancer ....'. 44 

Kidnevs 41 

Liver' 40 

Accidents 57 

Suicide 14 

These are some of the martyrs and 
Ihe martyrdoms of the world's workers 
which not even laws and inventions may 
prevent from becoming victims to the 
world's needs. 

Prizes Offered for Remedies. 

The constant increase of deaths from 
lead poisoning led the International Bu- 
reau of Labor, in Basle, Switzerland, to 
offer a series of prizes for essays on the 
best means of combat tin" lead poison- 
ing, as announced in Hardware and 
Metal several months ago, as follows : 

1. A prize of Jl,100 for the best es- 
sav upon the most practical method of 
eliminating the danger of lead poisoning 
during a process of handling lead ores. 

\ prize of J2.380 for the best cs- 
sav unon the elimination of the danger 
of lead poisoning in lead smelting works. 

8. Two prizes, one of 5505 and the 
second of $357. for the best essav upon 
Ihe elimination of the danger of lead 
poisoning in chemical and electrical 
works where lead is in use. 

1 Four prizes, one of S357. a second 
of $238, and two of SI 78 50 each, for the 

essavs upon the most prai 
method of avoiding lead poisoning in 
trades such as painting, enameline, etc 

5. Four prizes of Hie same amount 



,i- above for the best oss,i\s upon the 
elimination of the danger in factories 
where large quantities of lead are used, 
such as type foundries, printing estab 
lishinenis 

A New German Law. 

In European countries the painters' 
organizations have been agitating 
against the use of white lead, but with- 
out much success except in France, parts 
of Switzerland and Servia and a few- 
cities in Saxony. During the past year 
the painters of Germany have been gath- 
ering statistics of all cases of sickness 
resulting from the use of white lead 
which they have submitted to the Reich- 
stag and published in the press. The 
master painters claim that they can not 
do satisfactory work without it, while 
the factory owners who use white lead 
in their operations wish to be relieved 
of the responsibility of compensating 
their employes who become unable to 
work through its use. The Bundesrath 
finally adopted a law of which the main 
provisions are as follows . 

1. Men employed in crushing white 
lead in a dry state, or colors containing 
lead, must not come in bodily contact 
with it and must be protected from the 
dust. The mixing of white lead with oil 
or turpentine must be done by machin- 
ery so constructed that no dust gathers 
where men are employed. The mixing of 
colors from lead with oil or turpentine 
can be done by hand providing men over 
18 are employed and only a limited 
amount is mixed each day. 

2. Surfaces from which the coatings 
which mav contain lead have to he re- 
moved, must be kept wet and the ma- 
terial taken off must be disposed of 
while wet. 

3. The employer must see that his 
employes who handle or are in contact 
with lead wear special clothing and caps 
during working hours. 

1. AH men employed as painters, de- 
corators and varnishers or in other 
trades in which lead colors are used 
must be furnished by the employer with 
a wash basin, soap, a brush to clean 
hands and nails and a towel. On new 
buildings and also in lead works he must 
provide a dressing room free from frost 
where they can wash and hang their 
street clothes. 

.") The emnloyer must warn bis work- 
men of the danger to health in the use 
of lead and furnish each man with a 
CODV of the law governing such trades. 

The above provisions also applv to 
persons employed in white lead and 
((dot works, who do not directlv come 
in contact with those materials in their 
work. 

Workmen in factories where lend or 
nroducts are made or used are for- 
bidden to drink spirits of any kind in 
the workshops, and cannot leave the 
premises or eat and drink unon the 
premises without removing their work- 
ing clothes and washing thoroughly. On- 
Iv Hie clothes nrovided for the nurpose 
can be worn while at work, and smok- 
ing is forbidden. Those who after being 
warned persist in violating the regula- 
tions ran be disc-hatred without further 
notice although in Germany it is cus- 
tomary to give a certain length of no- 
tice before dismissal. 



TRADE INQUIRIES. 

Correspondents desiring to get in touch with any of 
the firms referred to should quote the reference number 
when requesting addresses. For information write to 
Superintendent of Commercial Agencies, Department of 
Trade and Commerce. Ottawa. 

1203. A Midlands company, manu- 
facturing harness and general saddlery, 
is prepared to appoint a suitable ('an 
adian resident firm to act as its 

agents. 

1204. A London firm possessing a 

large connection among builders, build- 
ers' merchants, ironmongers and engi- 
neers, is prepared to represent Canadian 
manufacturers of goods handled by the 
trades indicated. 

1206. An Antwerp exporter of iron, 
steel, materials for railway contrac- 
tors, plate glass, cement, etc., would 
like to g-et into communication with 
some of the leading Canadian importers 
of these articles. 

1209. A large Cape Town importer 
of wire fence netting is open to receive 
quotations f.o.b. Montreal, or St. 
John, X.B. 

1213. The manufacturers of a well- 
known bicycle would like to get into 
communication with Canadian import 
ing firm prepared to introduce their 
cycles. 



CANADIAN AGENCIES IN LONDON. 

A new departure is being made by 
Messrs. Herbert Rodgers & Co., Saracen 
House, Snow Hill, London, E.C., Eng- 
land, who have represented the Taylor- 
Forbes Company in England for some 
time. They plan to establish a Cana- 
dian United Manufacturers' Agency and 
Mr. Herbert Rodgers, the senior mem- 
ber of the firm, will visit Canada in 
Match to meet manufacturers who make 
appointments with him. Mr. John M. 
Taylor, of the Taylor-Forbes Company, 
refers to Mr. Rodgers as "a hustler, a 
man of good standing in his own coun- 
try, and capable of adapting himself to 
the requirements of any line that he 
might undertake to represent." Manu- 
facturers, therefore, who desire to es- 
tablish an agency in England should 
communicate with Mr. Rodgers at once. 
The plan of the agency will be to secure 
direct representation in the British Isles 
for Canadian manufacturers and the re- 
presentation of no manufacturer shall be 
taken up by the agency without the 
consent of all the other firms whose re- 
presentation is already in the hands of 
the agency. This is to ensure the fullest 
harmony of the united interests of all 
firms represented. 

The saving is obvious in the matter of 
London showrooms, offices and ware- 
houses, and also in provincial traveling 
expenses. Further economv would ap- 
pear in the matter of shipping goods, as 
all minimum freights on small shipments 
would J>e dispensed with. It is desired 
to give the agency such a standing that 
the inclusion of any firm becomes a guar- 
cntee to buvers. 



Push the "home trade" movement ; 
begm with yourself and family. If you 
.lie not consistent you should not blame 
others. 

18 



SEASONABLE GOODS. 

"That boy of mine," remarked Charley 
Hanks, "has gone and dressed the win- 
dow with snowshoes. Think of it ! 
When he ought to have lawn mowers on 
display ! "— Gait Reporter. 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RUNGS IN THE LADDER OF SUCCESS. 



BY F. S. KEITH. 



Every man, young or middle-aged, in 
the possession of his faculties, should 
In' keenly ;ilive to the boundless scope 
and breadth of possibility that the mom- 
ent offers. High up in the ladder the 
Minus are empty ami await an occupant. 
'I lie present holds out for you what no 
oilier decade could near approach. 

Do you realize the fact? 

A brief reflection would make this a 
conviction and, going further, quicken 
it into action. 

Possibly not the success of the mil- 
lionaire nor the statesman may be yours, 
but surely the real, genuine, satisfying 
success, the result of honest and well- 
directed effort, awaits you. This is ob- 
tained by making the most of one's self 
It means to those who have not made 
the attempt an enjoyment in being hith- 
erto unknown. 

For a New Year's resolution along the 
line of things that go to make success, 
let us suggest some reflection on the 
subject of the nobility of labor, having 
higher ideals, being confident, deter- 
mined, persevering, industrious and en- 
thusiastic. With these as an incentive 
no man can hold you back. 

Nobility, of Labor. 

The mechanic is the great producer of 
the day. He is daily adding to the 
wealth of the world and should be proud 
of the fact. When a man reaches the 
state when he no longer works with his 
hands and belittles honest toil, he occu- 
pies a ridiculous position. He has for- 
gotten that he is dependent upon the 
men who work for any measure of corn- 
tort he may enjoy. Suppose all the 
mechanics in the world were to stop 
work. How long would the wheels of 
Commerce or industry revolve? Not 
many hours. Let every mechanic hold 
up his head and look the whole world 
in the face, feeling that he is an im- 
portant and indispensable factor in the 
commonwealth. The writer knows the 
call of the 7 o'clock whistle, the clink 
of the time check and the line-up on pay 
day, and is glad of it. 

Ideals. 

No one has yet climbed higher than 
his ideal. No one ever shall. If you 
have not accomplished what you feel 
you might have, all the more reason for 
aspiring. If you are satisfied, then it 
is time to take Dr. Osier's prescription, 
whether you be twenty or three-score and 
ten. Look at the example of Richard 
Arkwright, the inventor of the spinning 
n achine, and take heart. At the age 
of fifty he set to work to learn English 
grammar, writing and spelling, working 
c lien from four in the morning until 
nine at night. Was he justified? See 
the result. Eighteen years later he was 
at the head of many manufactories, had 
risen to the position of high sheriff of 
Derbyshire and shortly after was knight- 
ed by George III. 

With no ideal beyond the daily round, 
one is as the miner with his torch 
extinguished, groping in the dark and 



unable to accomplish anything. If any 
of us have been living in the quarry- 
slave realm of thought, let us rise above 
it with all the strength of mind and body 
that we possess. 

Confidence. 

More perhaps than any requirable at- 
tribute that engenders success, confid- 
ence in one's ability to achieve is ne- 
cessary. This, coupled with a fair 
amount of assurance, has ciaused many a 
young man to climb the ladder when 
his equallv capable companion has fail- 
ed. Meekness is misunderstood for 
weakness and a lack of confidence is the 
forerunner of failure; Be confident. 

Determination. 

Despondency begets madness, but de- 
termination is the key-note of accom- 
plishment. How the world stands by 
for the determined man ! He is the 
great explorer or navigator, the success- 
ful general or the powerful captain of 
industry. This is the attribute that 
made a Napoleon and a Wellington, 
and due to this the victorious Japs 
achieved so much. A determined man is a 
tower of strength. Be. therefore, de- 
termined. 

Perseverance. 

History's pages are filled with the re- 
cords of men winning their laurels 
through sheer perseverance. It is not 
necessary to go beyond the realm of the 
mechanical world to find striking ex- 
amples. George Stephenson spent fif- 
teen years working on the improvement 
of his locomotive before meeting with 
his triumph at Reinhill. Another shin- 
ing light in this direction was James 
Watt. The latter would not acknow- 
ledge defeat and after 30 years of in- 
vestigation and toil he brought the 
steam engine to mechanical perfec- 
tion. Let us keep these examples be- 
fore us when our courage lags or our 
ardor cools, and resolve, as they well 
must have, neither relenting nor hesi- 
tating- until we have improved our pres- 
ent position. Persevere. 

Industry. 

Well directed industry brings its own 
reward. Unfortunately much individ- 
ual industry is misdirected and unpro- 
ductive. Patient plodding amplication 
without the accompaniment of thought 
never brings a person to an exalted posi- 
tion. On the other hand, however 
bright the mind or clear the conception, 
the lack of industry is fatal to success. 
Be industrious. 

Enthusiasm. 

Enthusiasm is one of the hardest Quali- 
ties to cultivate and maintain. It is 
one of the least common. The enthusias- 
tic man leads. He is a moulder of opin- 
ion. He is a factor in the community 
and in the workshop. He commands at- 
tention. He is influential. He rises 

19 



and progresses. He soars above his fel- 
lows, lie Ls-a marked man. Many peo- 
ple shrink from being enthusiastii 

tear of attracting attention. If you are 
on the right track, however, every throb 
of enthusiasm opens the channel to high- 
er things and to a position where one's 
abilities have fuller scope. Cultivate 
enthusiasm. 



DEATH OF JOHN WILSON. 

Montreal daily papers announced, last 
Saturday, the sudden death, in Glasgow, 
Scotland, of John Wilson, president of 
Thos. Robertson & Co., Limited, of Mont- 
real, and father of -lames l.'eiil W i 
who is vice-president and managing 
director of the same firm. 

Mr. Wilson belonged to a type all too 

miic mini in modern business life. He 

was a man of unusual honor and integ- 
rity, striving always to conduct the var- 
ious commercial enterprises in which he 
was interested, on the highest possible 
plane. Ilis sincerity in this, is shown 
by the fact that, when chairman of the 
Shareholders' Committee, appointed to 
Liquidate the City of Glasgow Bank, he, 
as one of me few shareholders who re- 
mained solvent, contributed in calls, 
twenty-seven and a half times the value 
of his holdings. He always contended 
that a man's greatest worldly posses- 
sion was an honest name, and his own 
life was a practical example of this 
doctrine. For ten years he represented 
the constituency of Gbvan, in the British 
House of Commons. 

The deceased was chairman of some 
of the leading industries in Scotland, 
and was also interested in business en- 
terprises in all parts of the world. In 
L855, he established, in Montreal, the 
firm of Thos. Robertson & Co., Limited, 
of which his son is at the present time 
managing director. 



SMITH'S FALLS NEW FOUNDRY. 

Smith's Falls is to have a new iron 
stove foundry, which will be erected 
next Summer. The promoters of this 
new industry are Mayor Foster, \)v. 
Gray and John McEwen, all well-known 
business and financial men in town. A 
joint-stock company, with a paid-up 
capital of $30,000 is being- organized. 
The building will cost $15,000, and will 
be modern in every respect. All kinds 
of stoves will be manufactured, and it 
is pioposed to start with a staff of from 
20 to 25 moulders. 



A PLEASING MEMENTO. 

McFarlane & Douglas, manufacturers 
of galvanized iron cornices, etc., Otta- 
wa, have issued a very pleasing and 
seasonable card in the shape of a 
shield, with a representation of a 
shield, the firm's emblem, and a sig- 
nificant sprig of holly. Across the face 
of the card are the words : "May that 
which was unpleasant or unprofitable 
during 1905 disappear with the old 
year, and may good fortune, health and 
prosperity be your companions during 
1906." 



Hardware and Metal 



BD1TORIAL 



January 6, 1906 



Hardware *-Metal 



President : 
JOH\ B4Y>E MACIBAH 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publisher of lr.i.if Newspapers which circulate in 
ihe Province* of British Columbia. North-West Ter- 
ritories. Manitoba, Ontario. Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
Nru Brunswick, P.E. Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal, 
roRONTD, 

UisNim., 
I ON'notf, K\, 



OPTH I - 

232 McC.ill Street 
I i lephone Main 1255 
10 Front Street East 
Telephone-. Main 2701 and 2702 
511 L'nion Bank Building 
Telephone 3726 
- 88 Fleet Street. E.C. 
J. Meredith McKim 
Telephone, Central 12960 

BRANCHES ! 

Sr John- N B ... No. 3 Market Wharf 

VBR, B.C. - - - Geo. S. B. Perry 

PARIS, FRANCE - Agence Havas, 8 Place de la Bourse 
sTtR. Eng. 92 Market Street 

ZfRicH, Switzerland - - - Louis \\ oil 

Orell Fussli & Co. 

Subscription. Canada and United States. $2.00 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

r< li .u / Adscript, London 

Cable Address | Adscri £ t , Canada 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Wilkinson Plough Co . Toronto Junction. 
Carter Publishing Co., London, Eng. 
Hobbs Hardware Co , London, Ont. 
Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal, Que. 



MUST TAKE A BACK SEAT. 

ANDREW CARNEGIE and Pierpont 
Morgan want to discharge Mr. 
Corey from the steel trust, 
not because he has deserted the 
faithful wife who helped him fight 
his way up from poverty, but be- 
cause both of these men aiv shrewd 
enough to know that no man living can 
go the pace that kills and attend to busi- 
ness at i lie same time. 

The old day of the great lawyer, who 
gdl drunk on the day of the trial, and 
of the great preacher who thought he 
couldn't preach unless his bta ; n was 
Bred with alcohol, ami of the great 
financier who worked tip a corner in the 
morning and drank himself insensible in 
the afternoon, are gone. Gone with the 
stage-coach and the tallow candle. Gone 
with the hob-tail car and the herdic. 
Business is business to-day, as it never 
was before in the history f the world, 
and no man can do "business and get 
drunk. 

Mi. Corey is not accused of drinking 
lo excess; neither was Mr. Hyde of the 
lit'.- insurance scandal, but no man can 
give champagne suppers to actresses, and 
absinthe breakfasts to dancers, and auto- 
mobile carouses to the riff-raff of a pro- 
fession, not always celebrated for its 
noble purity of ideas, and keep his head 
clear for business. 



Doctor Jekyl was all right as long as 
he could keep Mr. Hvde at home, but 
Mr, Hyde is a gentleman of roving dis- 
position and when von have once given 
him the pleasure of your acquaintance, 
you will find him standing on the comer 
waiting for you whenever you take your 
walks abroad. 

No man can keep a clear head unless 
lie leads a clean life. Even the saloon- 
keepers and the prize fighters have found 
this out. 

forty years ago, a prize fighter was 
apt to be a dissipated beast, to-day he 
is sober, hardworking, plain living. He 
has to be, or some - man who is, will get 
the best of him. 

No man can hold even the smallest, 
clerkship, in any large business to-day 
unless he has a clear brain, a steady 
hand, and a bright pair of eyes, with 
which to meet his employer's glance 
when he comes to his desk in the morn- 
ing. The old-fashioned newspaperman, 
who went on a carouse every once in so 
often, has been crowded out of the pro- 
fession by the man who was there to do 
his work, while the other was nursing 
the headache of the "day afterwards." 

No man can be a telegraph operator 
to-day unless he's a sober man. The 
railroad companies do not employ a man 
who drinks. There is no place in the 
business wot Id for any man who has not 
at least good sense enough to keep his 
blood running through his veins in the 
swift course of clean health. 

Mr. William Ellis Corey is dropping 
out of the race like an old horse who has 
seen his best days, and he is dropping 
out, not because the men who are forcing 
him to go are trying to teach a moral 
lesson, but because he is no longer fit 
for the business with which he has been 
entrusted. 

"Business is business," is not after 
all such a bad moral axiom, is it? 



MINERAL PROSPECTS. 

i ^ INCE the mining boom in British 
^ Columbia a few years ago, and the 
Klondike gold discoveries, there has 
been a steady though somewhat less spec- 
tacular movement in mining affairs in 
Canada. Discoveries made within past 
two years have proven beyond a shadow 
of a doubt that Canada's future as a 
leading mining country for years to 
come is assured 

The report of the electric smelting 
operations being carried on under Gov- 
ernment supervision at Sault Ste. Marie 
giving every indication of a. commercial 
application and proving the economy of 
electric smelting stimulates the mineral 
strength and wealth of Canada in no 

20 



small measure. With the inauguration 
of this process on a commercial basis 
the water powers of the north will be 
harnessed to reduce the mountains of 
iron ore and make Canada the greatest. 
iron producing country of the world. 

In this country are to be found nearly- 
all the mica in America as well as the 
richest veins of asbestos ever dis- 
covered. The recent startling finds of 
silver in the Cobalt district show to 
some extent the possibilities of North- 
em Ontario mining, these latter being 
2onceded the richest finds of silver yet 
made. The nickel of the Sudbury dis- 
trict is already famous, the enormous 
amount of which has never been dupli- 
cated in the history of the mineral dis- 
coveries of the world. 

Some idea of the value of Ontario's 
minerals during the nine months ending 
with September is given in the report 
of the Director of the Bureau of Mines, 
who uses for the purpose the selling 
price of the products at the mines or 
works. The total value of these for the 
nine months mentioned is given as $1), 
000,000, which means that as refined 
metals these ores estimate an amount 
equivalent to twice that at least. Of 
this amount $3,890,(100 represents nickel 
and silver. With such an enormous pro- 
duction of valuable ores it is a strange 
fact that as far as present development 
joes these cannot be refined in this 
country. 



BUSINESS MEN FOR COUNCIL. 

For several years past nearly all the 
great American cities have been taking 
up the subject of municipal reform. Much 
good has been done by the agitation 
directed against corrupt methods, and 
the age of the grafter has been all but 
terminated. Still another difficulty has 
presented itself, however, for, in the 
management of large cities just as in 
that of large business corporations, some 
qualifications are necessary besides hon- 
esty and straightforwardness. And il is 
the recognition of this difficulty which 
has encouraged men of business instinct 
and training to present themselves for 
election in many cities. 

Among the cities of this continent 
which have suffered through incompetent 
or dishonest administration, Montreal 
takes a prominent place, but the re- 
action towards clean and able govern- 
ment set in when the business men of 
that city began to interest themselves 
in its affairs. Since that time a grad- 
ual improvement has been made in all 
departments, perhaps the ablest rule the 
city has ever experienced being that of 
the retiring Mayor Laporte, himself one 
of Montreal's most prominent business 
men. 

This fact has been so appreciated by 



January 6, 1906 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



the business fraternity of Montreal thai 
a representative number of them met re- 
cently in the Board of 'trade chambers 
io discuss the advisability ol nominat- 
ing men in all the main wards of the 
tily to contest the coming aldermanic 
elections, backed up by the business 
vote. A committee was appoinled'to in- 
terview probable candidates, and calls 
were made on present members who had 
given satisfaction, hut as some of these 
were retiring, other names were brought 
in and recommended to the approval of 
the business men, who again assembled 
to hear the report towards the end of 
last week. These names were approved, 
and there are now two aldermanic can- 
didates in each of the four main wards 
carrying the banner of Montreal's com- 
mercial interests. This ticket (if such 
it may be called) shows no spirit of 
partiality, but, on the other hand, 
proves that the business men are sincere 
in their endeavors to give the city an 
economical and far-seeing administra- 
tion. The list contains the names of 
two merchants, one physician and one 
advocate who are thought to have the 
requisite business acumen to direct 
Montreal's affairs for the next two 
years. 

From the tone of the daily press it 
would seem that this move on the part 
of the business men meets with very 
wide approval, and everything looks 
favorable for an emphatic ratification in 
the approaching municipal elections. 



OUR LETTER BOX 

Correspondence on matters of interest to the hard- 
ware trade is solicited. Manufacturers, juKbrrs, 
H-iiiiVrs ami clerks, s re urged to express tneir npto 
i'-riK on matters under discussion 



NOT COMING TO CANADA. 

The statement given circulation in 
many Canadian papers last week to the 
effect that Sargent <fe Co., hardware 
manufacturers, New Haven, Conn., in- 
tended to establish a $2,000,000 plant in 
Canada has proved to be a canard. A 
report from Ottawa stated definitely 
that representatives of the company had 
made arrangements to visit Canada in 
January to secure a factory site. 

In a letter to Hardware and Metal 
Messrs. Sargent & Company give the 
report an emphatic denial, saying : "We 
have never considered the question of 
dividing our manufacturing efforts into 
two parts ; have never entertained the 
idea of manufacturing in any other 
country than where we are, and have 
oo knowledge of the publication of such 
a proposition other than the information 
given in the letters of invitation receiv- 
ed from various commercial bodies and 
individuals in Canadian cities during the 
past week." 



11 \ou live in a creamery country, the 
department of creamery supplies ought 
to be an important one with you. It is 
not large, but there is a chance for busi- 
ness in good chunks. 



TIME RECORDING IN WAREHOUSE. 
Editor Hardware and Metal : 

Dear Sir :— I am in receipt of yours 
of December 22, and as regards record- 
ing clerks' time, at the present time we 
reallj have no very great check. For 
years we kept a time clock, but some 
three years ago, or thereabout, we de- 
cided to do away with same and put 
everyone on their honor as to what 
time they came in and what time they 
went out, as well as having them on 
their honor while they were in the build- 
ing, and in our judgment we have better 
results than formerly. We neither exact 
fines nor give rewards. Overtime is not 
paid for, but we endeavor as much as 
possible to have the work done in day 
lime so that it will not be necessary 
for any of the regular hands to put in 
overtime, excepting perhaps at such 
time as stock-taking. 

We have invariably paid our hands for 
lost time on account of sickness or 
other causes. We also close Saturday at 
1 o'clock, and in addition to this a 
week's holidays are given to each of the 
employes and the same paid for by us. 

We endeavor as much as possible to 

have a bond of unity between our staff 

and the firm and we think the best way 

to have this is to treat them like men. 

Yours truly, 

1IOBBS HARDWARE CO., LTD. 

London, Dec. 23, 1905. 

A RETAILERS' ORGANIZATION 
NEEDED. 

Editor Hardware and Metal : 

Dear Sir : — 1 am very much pleased to 
see that your excellent paper has taken 
up the agitation in Ontario for a retail 
hardware association. I think this is 
an absolute necessity for the redemption 
of the hardware - business and to again 
put it on a profitable basis. 

1 have noticed in the last ten or 
twelve years a number of men enter in- 
to the hardware business without the 
least experience and have made great in- 
roads on prices in different lines until 
the greater half of the hardware business 
has to be done at a loss. 

1 am a firm believer that all goods 
without exception should be sold at a 
profit, and what 1 call a profit is the 
amount above all cost, viz., cost plus 
freight and cartage, plus cost of running 
business, plus profit you want to make 
on the article. 

I also noticed the letter in Hardware 
and Metal of the 30th inst. giving other 
reasons why there should be an associa- 
tion of this kind and 1 think they are 

21 



;ill equally important to the hardware 
dealer and could be discussed and a 
remedy found for each case and any olli 
ers that might crop up at the meeting 
by the many able men who are sure to 
attend and assist in the making of this 
association. 

You have my entire sympathy and 
support in this movement and if wanted 
and able to attend your meeting 1 will 
he glad to assist in the forming of this 
association, and trust it will be cai i led 
io a successful issue. 

1 am, yours faithfully, 

J. E. WESTCOTT. 

Ailsa Craig, Jan. 1, 1900. 



THE COMBINE INVESTIGATIONS 

Ou another page will be found a full 
report of the progress of the investiga- 
tion into the tack combine," whicn 
was commenced last week. In the sit- 
tings this week a great deal of evidence 
was taken from the minute books and 
correspondence of the Tack Association. 
This evidence is of interest to the hard- 
ware trade, and Hardware and Metal 
will, during the course of the trial, give 
as full and accurate reports as it is 
possible to secure. 

This paper is a strong believer in the 
organization of trade associations, and 
so long as they are conducted in a legal 
manner will give tnem every support. 
The present investigation will show 
whether the various hardware associa- 
tions charged with restraining trade are 
conducted upon an equitable basis to 
ail branches oi the trade, and the trials 
are to be welcomed from the standpoint 
that they will clear the atmosphere and 
bring about a better understanding be- 
tween the various branches of the trade. 

The investigation into the plumbers' 
"combine'' was conducted in the face of 
a very hostile public opinion, inflamed 
by sensational newspaper articles, and 
the almost universal giving of the 
T.U.U.'s" made it impossible to de- 
fend flie master plumbers indicted. The 
hardware investigations, however, stand 
a better chance of being conducted in 
an unbiased manner. This, as well as 
the plumbers' trials, are understood to 
have already cost nearly $25,000 
through fines and legal expenses. 

Manufacturers and jobbers consider 
that the tack investigation so far has 
resulted in the unearthing of nothing of 
importance, and nothing of an illegal 
nature. They look upon the Crown 
prosecutors as being on a fishing expedi 
tion, and very unlikely to catch any 
fish. Rather than stirring up trouble 
amongst business men they consider the 
court officials would he better employee! 
getting after burglars and other crimin- 
als who are a menace to society. 



January 6. 1906 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



Throughout all history intelligent busi 
ncss men have banded together to regu- 
late trade so that a living profit can 
lie secured, and in spite of Mr. Curry's 
interference this condition is certain to 
continue. 

S me retailers, on the other hand, 
welcome the investigation, there being 
many who have had similar experiences 
t" thai of Mr. Martineau, a Quebec 
hardware merchant, who was buying 
^ taeks. and also bought horseshoe nails, 
from the Portland Rolling Mills, think 
ing this concern was also in the horse 
shoe nail association; hut they were 
not. and Martineau could not get his 
special "loyalty" discount of 5 per 
cent, from the Tack Association. Joseph 
Le Tourneaux. of Montreal, is another 
who criticizes the association, saying: 
"It is a hardship that after buying $300 
worth of tacks, the total amount we 
require for the year, to be compelled to 
purchase $200 worth that we do not re- 
quire in order to get the 12i per cent. 
quantity discount." 

In the course of the investigation this 
week the discount system was enlarged 
upon. Tt was further contended that 
the pooling- made it unnecessary for the 
manufacturers to fig-tit each other for 
business, and as those who broke their 
agreements by selling- below the agreed- 
upon figures were fined, this constituted 
a breach of the law in reference to the 
restraint of trade. 

Magistrate Denison took this view. 
and indicated his intention was to com- 
mit the accused for trial by summing 
up this part of the evidence in the fol- 
lowing statement : "If these people 
should just agree with one another to 
sell at a fixed juice that would be dif- 
ferent, hut -when these people associate 
to fix a price and fine any member of 
the association who sells at a lower 
price — why, that is unduly restricting 
trade." 

Another feature which is worthy of 
mention is the giving of special dis- 

■ tints to railways and large manufac- 
turing concerns. According to the 
minutes, in 1896 the G.T.R., C.P.R., 
M.C.R., and I.C.R., secured a discount 
of 12h and 2\ per cent, off from the as- 
sociation. The Portland Rolling Mills 
were allowed to give U. S. prices to 
two American concerns. The Toronto 
Plate Glass Company was given a dis- 
count of 15 per cent, oft* the face value 
of glaziers' points, and the Massey- 
Harris Company was also given special 
ounts after threatening to import 
from the United States. 

Next Monday the Criminal Assizes 
commence, and the various plumbers 
cases come up for trial. The cases in- 
clude : Edward Gurney and 124 others; 
W. II. Carriek and three others, W. II. 
Storey and twelve others, W. .1. Mc 
Guire and twelve others, John Steven- 
son and eight others, Alex. Fiddes 
and nineteen others, and Geo. F. Mc- 
Guire and seventeen others; the first 
three on charges of conspiracy and the 
others on charges of fraud. 



SUCCESSFUL JOBBERS 
AND SALESMEN. 



No. 13. 



Uioiil twenty years ago "Tom" 
Johnston, manager of the lead works, 
and one of the oldest and most valued 
employes of the Toronto branch of the 
James Robertson Company, induced W. 
II. Sheppard, then a young lad, to leave 
Ins po sit ion with one of the express 
companies to join the shipping staff of 
the James Robertson Company, at that 
time manufacturing and dealing in only 
a lew of such lines as saws, lead pipe, 
white lead, etc. For ten years Mr. 
Sheppard occupied various positions in 
the warehouse and factory, learning the 
business from all sides. 

During the past ten years, however, 
he has represented ' the company as 




W. H. Sheppard 

Representing; the James Robertson Company, Toronto 

in northern part of Western Ontario. 

traveling salesman in the northern part 
of Western Ontario, selling paints and 
plumbing materials. In his time he has 
seen a wonderful development in the 
company's business, and that their busi- 
ness has not suffered in his territory is 
evidenced by the fact that his district 
has had to be made smaller on several 
occasions when additional salesmen 
were put on the road in order to have 
the ground covered thoroughly. 

Mr. Sheppard is a genial, whole-souled 
fellow, who both makes and retains 
friends. At business he is always "on 
the job," and many customers have 
been able to close good contracts by 
his good salesmanship. Wherever he 
finds a prospective customer dickering 
with a plumber or paint dealer he 
makes it a point to give the likely buy- 
er the benefit of his expert knowledge, 

22 



going fo the building where the job is 
to he done and making up a close esti- 
mate of the cost of the work. As one 
of his friends said the other day, "When 
Shep. goes alter a job he usually lands 
it." In addition to looking after busi 
ness for his customers while on the 
road Mr. Sheppard closely watches the 
shipping department when in town on 
Saturdays, seeing that no shipments are 
delayed when goods are in stoek. 

Howling on the green is a favorite 
sport of Mr. Sheppard's, although In- 
takes a keen interest in the other sports 
participated in at plumbers' picnics and 
reunions. 



A PLEASANT DINNER. 

The ninth annual banquet tendered by 
the president and directors of the Thos. 
Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited, Montreal, 
to their travelers and heads of depart- 
ments, on the evening of December 29, 
was a great success, and thoroughly en- 
joyed by all the participants. 

The function, which was held in the 
club room of the employes, on Vinet 
street, was presided over by Mr. Jas. 
Davidson, the president of the company, 
who proposed the health of the King, a 
toast which was right royally respond- 
ed to. 

The travelers were next to be 
honored, Mr. Goodwill proposing this 
toast in a happy vein, while Messrs. J. 
N. Young and R. B. Gray replied on be- 
half of the "knights of the grip." Af- 
ter the toast to "The Office and Ware- 
rooms Staff" had been proposed by Mr. 
H. B. Chadburn, and responded to by 
Mr. John Hamilton, Mr. T. C. David- 
son proposed "Heads of Departments," 
which elicited a response from A. 0. 
Gee, who has been in the employ of the 
company for over thirty years. 

Mr. Arthur Daniels proposed the 
health of "The Ladies," whose cause 
was well championed by Mr. Hoar, in 
his reply. The toast of "Canada" was 
next proposed by Mr. M. Lachapelle, 
while Mr. W. H. Morgan responded. 

Mr. W. J. White, ICC, proposed the 
health of "The President and Direc- 
tors," and Mr. Jas. Davidson, replying 
on behalf of the board, referred to the 
fact that a change was about to be 
made in the internal arrangements of 
the company. He himself, after twenty- 
five years' service as general manager 
of the company, and thirty-five years' 
connection with the business, had de- 
cided to retire from the position of gen- 
eral manager, which would now be as- 
sumed by his brother, Mr. T. Chas. 
Davidson. He would still retain the 
office of president of the company, and 
his interest in its affairs would be by 
no means diminished. At this point he 
read a congratulatory telegram from 
Mr. Taylor Webb, manager of the Win- 
nipeg branch, and seized the oppor- 
tunity of presenting a life-size portrait 
of the late Mr. Thos. Davidson (the 
founder of the firm) to Mr. L. B. Jenk- 
ins, representing for the occasion the 
Winnipeg branch, to be forwarded to the 
Winnipeg office. 

With toasts to the factory superin- 
tendent and banquet committee, an en- 
joyable evening was brought to a close. 
Songs, etc., were rendered between 
toasts. 



January 6, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 




Quebec. 

A. Chevalier, plumber, of Joliette, 
paid a visit, to Montreal recently. 

A. Archambault, plumber, of Hull, 
Que., was in Montreal on business this 
week. 

George E. Delorme, tinsmith and 
plumber, Sherbrooke, visited Montreal 
this week. 

Frank Mason, head shipper for the 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, spent a few 
days this week in Montreal. 

Mr. Butler, of W. G. Butler & Son, 
hardware merchants, Perth, Ont., spent 
part of this week in Montreal. 

Mr. Oilman, general manager of the 
Canadian Rand Drill Co., Sherbrooke, 
spent the latter part of this week in 
Montreal. 

Jas. McClatchie, of McClatchie Bros., 
hardware merchants and plumbers, 
Cowansville, was in Montreal a few 
days ago. 

T. J. Best has resigned from the posi- 
tion of director and superintendent of 
Warden King & Son, Limited, found- 
ers, Montreal. 

F. Hvde has severed his connection 
with the firm of Francis Hyde & Co., 
importers and dealers in contractors' 
and founders' supplies. 

M. H. Day, general manager of the 
Consumers' Cordage Company, Limited. 
Montreal, spent a few days of this week 
in Boston and New York. 

Geo. M. Edwards, managing director 
of Henderson & Potts Co., Limited, 
Montreal, spent the week in Winnipeg, 
on a hurried business trip. 

Aneus MeLeod, hardware merchant, 
of Sydney, C.B., has spent the week in 
Montreal, stopping at the Queen's. Mr. 
MeLeod is combining business with 
pleasure on this trip. 

W. R. McLean, of McLean & Sophus, 
Montreal, is taking a trip to Ontario 
points, and will spend some time con- 
sidering possibilities of water power 
development in those places. 

J. P. MacKav, of the traveling staff 
of Cavcrhill, Learmont & Co., who was 
off the road during the whole of De- 
cember, owing- to a severe attack of 
la grippe and trouble with his eyes, has 
quite recovered, and will start out on 
his territory again this week. 

Montreal hardware men were greatly 
moved bv the news received last Tues- 
day of the death in Kingston of Dr. 
Orlando Strange. His son, Mr. C. M. 
Strange, is widely known as sales- 
manaerer and director of Lewis Bros., 
Limited. 

The Manufacturers' Hockey League 
have entered upon a series of games 
which will continue until March 5. The 
teams composing the league are : Allis- 
Chalmers-Bullock, Limited: Canadian 
Rubber Co.. Limited; Henry Birks &- 
Sons. Bell Telephone Co., and Canada 
Car Co. 

Before the Tariff Commission, at Que- 
bec, Mr. Henri Bazin, manufacturer of 



nails and tacks, complained of the high 
rate of dutv charged on steel plates 
from No. 12 to 10, $7 per ton or 20 per- 
cent., while only 5 per cent is charged 
on thinner and more valuable plates. He 
also complained of combines amongst 
manufacturers, which tended to restrict 
trade. 

Ontario. 

Ben Noble, plumber, London, was a 
New Year's week visitor to Toronto. 

W. D. Smith, plumber, Hamilton, vis- 
ited Toronto in the early part of the 
week. 

0. M. Hodgson, Bolton, Ont., has sold 
his hardware business to Smith & 
Sheaf er, Moncton, N.B. 

Mr. Spencer, manager of the Rochester 
Lamp Co., Toronto, is recovering; from 
a severe attack of la grippe. 

Fred Somerville, manager of the On- 
tario Lead &■ Wire Company, Toronto, 
is in New York on a business trip. 

B. J. Morris, secretary of the Central 
Supply Association, Toronto, has been 
on a week's pleasure trip to New York. 

Mr. Albert Karges, of Gardner & Co., 
Winnipeg, was a caller at the Toronto 
office of Hardware and Metal Tuesday 
last. 

Burglars entered the hardware store 
of W. M. Pringle, Whitby, last week and 
stole some cutlery and other goods in 
addition to some money secured from 
the cash register. 

Albert McBrady, bookkeeper for Cot- 
ter Bros., plumbers, Winnipeg, was a 
visitor in Toronto this week. Mr. Mc- 
Brady was formerly with the John 
Ritchie Company, Toronto. 

M. E. Murray, Canadian agent for the 
Borden Company's solid adjustable die 
machine, attended a banquet given by 
the company to its agents and traveling 
salesmen at Warren, Ohio, last Friday 
evening. 

J. Culliton, who has plumbing shops 
at the "Soo" and Fort William, was a 
visitor in Toronto New car's week, re- 
newing old acquaintanceships. Mr. Culli- 
ton reports a satisfactory season's busi- 
ness in these growing towns. 

The Pratt-Letchworth Malleable Iron 
Works at Brantford gave a large ban- 
quet to their employes and friends last 
Saturday night. A special train brought 
fifty guests from Buffalo, where the 
headquarters of the company are locat- 
ed. 

Mr. T. A. Russell, general manager of 
the Canada Cycle & Motor Co., tendered 
a banquet to the managers of the differ- 
ent departments of the company, travel- 
ing salesmen, and representatives from 
Halifax, Vancouver and Winnipeg last 
Friday evening. 

Mr. T. McC. Hutchinson, of Drum- 
mond, McCall & Co., Montreal, and Mr. 
H. J. Hamilton, Toronto representative 
of that company, leave on Sunday for 
Pittsburg, where they will meet some 
important men connected with the steel 

23 



industry regarding the coming season's 
business. 

Win. Ilyslop, jr., Toronto, has return- 
ed from Europe, where he attended tin- 
automobile show at Paris a few weeks 
ago. lie has secured the Canadian 
agency for the Beeston-IIuinber and the 
Darracq automobiles, two of the best 
known machines manufactured in Eng- 
land and France. 

The Fairbanks-Morse Canadian Manu- 
facturing Co., Toronto, have placed a 
contract for the heating and ventilating 
apparatus for their new factory on 
Bloor street west, including separate 
apparatus for their machine shops, 
blacksmithing shops and foundry. The 
B. F. Sturtevant Co., Boston, have se- 
cured the contract but the price is not 
yet announced. 

Mr. John Bishop, one of the oldest 
hardware merchants in Brantford, died 
last week, aged seventy-four years. In 
1853 Mr. Bishop began as a clerk with 
the firm of A. & J. Cleghorn. About 
1861 he went into partnership with Mr. 
Farr and since 1877 he has been in busi- 
ness for himself, his son having been a 
partner since 1899. Mr. Bishop has not, 
been in good health for the past eighteen 
months. 

The Toronto branch of the Pedlar Peo- 
ple, Oshawa, has been moved from: the 
corner of Yonge and Wellington streets 
to 11 Colborne street, where the com- 
pany has secured more commodious of- 
fices and warehouses. The business of 
the company in Toronto has increased 
remarkably since the branch was opened 
a few months ago, and the move marks 
another milestone in the progress of this 
growing business. 

The Colonial Cordage Co., Toronto, 
have appointed as their agents in Mont- 
real the Commercial Twine Co., Limit- 
ed, who will carry a full stock of the 
Colonial Company's goods. The Com- 
mercial Twine Co. were formerly repre- 
sentatives of the Consumers' Cordage 
Co., but the change is only natural, as 
the president of the Commercial Twine 
Co. is a brother of Mr. W. B. Converse, 
managing director of the Colonial Cord- 
age Co. 

Mr. J. H. Lyons, known to a large 
section of the hardware trade in On- 
tario previous to nine years ago, up to 
which time he had been traveling repre- 
sentative of M. & L. Samuel, 
Benjamin & Company, has again 
accepted a position with that 

company and will in future repre- 
sent them in the territory between 
Montreal and Toronto. During the past 
nine years Mr. Lyons has represented a 
large Buffalo metal firm and this, with 
his eighteen years experience on the 
road with Messrs. Samuel, Benjamin & 
Co., gives him over a quarter of a cen- 
tury experience as a traveling salesman. 

Western Canada. 

Mr. J. F. Bole, manager of the Regiha 
Trading Co., who was one of the Libera' 
candidates for Regina for the Saskat- 
chewan Legislature, has been declared 
elected by a majority of three on a re- 
count. 

United States. 

Mr. Frank G. Raible, advertising man- 
ager for E. C. Atkins & Company, saw 
manufacturers, Indianapolis, Ind., died 
on December 16. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 6, 1906 




(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, pace 62.) 



THE WEEK S MARKETS IN BRIEF. 

MONTREAL. 

Ingot Copper i> no« quoted at from 90 

lie 
Antimony baa advanced 
Bar Iron is selling al $2.00 f.o.b. Montreal. 
Builders' Hardware — American manufacturers 

have withdrawn lists. 
Merchant Iron— New prices are announced. 
Linseed Oil has advanced S2c. and 55c. 

TOROHTO. 
Bolder— Hall and half has advanced to 23c. 
Linseed Oil — A big advance of 4c. has heen 

made. 
Turpentine Trices have advanced 2c, 
Builders' Hardware A Hi advance has heen 

made by I'nited States manufacturers. 
Zinc 8pelter- Another l / t c. advance has heen 

made. 
Antimony — A ',:. advance has been made by 

some jobbers. 



Quebec Hardware Markets. 

Office of Hardware lkd Metal, 

232 HoOill Street. 

Montreal, Jim 5, 1906 

Nearly all American manufacturers of 
builders' hardware have withdrawn their 
prices, substituting figures very much 
higher for 1906. Although Montreal 
jobbers have nol vet adjusted their lists 
to suit the altered conditions, it is 
thought that they will soon have new 
prices ready for their travelers, and they 
will probably go into effect next week. 
Canadian makers have not revised prices 
yet, but present expectations are that 
they will not be long in following' suit. 

Trade this week is quiet, but prospects 
arc bright for a splendid trade, when the 
campaign is fully open. 

Axes — Trade this week is somewhat 
lighl in this as well as in other lines. 
We quote: Chopping axes, unhandled, 
$6.00 to $9.50 per dozen; double bill 
axes. $9.50 to $12 a dozen: handled 
axes. $7.50 to $9.50; Canadian pattern 
axes, $7.50 a dozen. 

Handles— We quote: No. 3, $1.25; 
No. 2, $1.50; No. 1, $1.90 a dozen; adze 
handles. 34 inch, $2.20 a dozen; pick 
handles. No. 2, $1.70; No. 3. $1.50 a 
dozen. 

Hay Wire— Kereni advances have been 
stiffly held. We are quoting: No. 13, 
$2.45; No. 14, $2.55: No. 15, $2.70; net 
cash, f.o.b., Montreal. 

Sewing Machines Sales are not num- 
erous, hut the outlook is favorable for 
good business during the year just com- 
mencing. Our prices are as follows: 
Hand-sewing machines, $11 each, net: 
complete machines, with stand. $18.00 
and up, according to quality. 

Lanterns— No feature- are apparent in 
the trade. We gi - : Cold blast. 

0; No. ii Safety, $5.00. 
Rivets and Burrs-Small quantities 
going out as usual, and prices are 



well maintained. We quote as follows: 
P.est iron rivets, section, carriage and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do.. 
copper rivets and tin swede rivets, 60, 
10 and 10 per cent.; swede iron burrs 
are quoted at (50 and 10 and 10 per cent, 
off new lists: copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 40 per cent. 
off; and coppered iron rivets and burrs 
in 5-lb. carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 
10 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 30 and 
10 per cent., subject to usual charge for 
hall -pound boxes. 

Screws — We still quote as follows: 
Round head, bright. 82 1-2 per 
cent.; flat head, bright, 87 1-2 per cent., 
brass, round head, 75 per cent.; brass, 
flat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— It is expected that 
trade in this line will be particularly 
heavy during the coming months. Our 
juices are as follows: 3-8 and smaller. 
60 to 10; 7-16 and larger 55 and 5. 

Horse Nails— We quote as follows: 
C brand, 40, 10 and 7 1-2 per cent..: 
M.R.M. Co., 55 per cent.; P.B. brand. 55 
per cent 

Wire Nails— We are still giving prices 
at $2.15 per keg, f.o.b. Montreal. 

Cut Nails— There is little or no activ- 
ity displayed. We quote: $2.20 pet- 
keg, f.o.b. Montreal. 

Horseshoes— We give the following 
prices: IMS. New Pattern, base price, 
$3.50 per 100 lbs.. M.R.M Co. latest im- 
proved pattern iron shoes, light and 
medium pattern No. 2 and larger, $3.65; 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; snow pattern. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90, No. 1 and smaller 
$4.15. Light steel shoes, No. 2 and. larg- 
er, $4, No. 1 and smaller, $4.25: feath- 
erweight, all sizes. No. to 4, $5.60. 
Toeweight, all sizes. N'o. 1 to 4, $6.85 
Packing, up to three sizes in a keg, 10c. 
per 100 pounds. More than three sizes. 
25c. 

Sporting Goods — We are quoting as 
follows: Canadian made shells, black. 
25 and 5 per cent.; smoKeless, 25, 10 and 
5 ner cent.. American centre-fire cart- 
ridges, list net; sporting and military. 
10 per cent, advance on list; primers, 
$2.05 per thousand; American loaded 
shells, 20 per cent, discount; B.B. caps, 
$2.00 per thousand; standard shot, $6.50 
per hundred pounds; chilled, $7.00 per 
hundred pounds; buck and steel, $7.50 
per hundred pounds; ball, $8.00 per hund- 
red pounds. We quote discounts 10 per 
cent, on shot, f.o.b., Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, St; John and 
Halifax. 

Building Papers— Conditions are by no 
means altered since .our last report. 
Quite naturally, there is very little busi- 
ness doing in this line at present. Prices 
remain as before. 

Cement and Firebrick — This is an- 

24 



other line which is very quiet at present. 
Our quotations are as follows: 
$1.80 to $1.00; Belgium, $1.60 to $1.90 
per barrel ; ex-store, American, $2.00 to 
$2.10 ex-cars; Canadian Portland, $2.00 
to $2.05. Firebrick, English and Scotch, 
$17.00 to $21.00; American, $30 to $35: 
White Bios." Eng. cement, $1.80 in bags, 
$2.05 in barrels in round lots. 

Coil Chain— Our prices are as fol- 
lows: 5-16 inch, $4.25; 3-8 inch, $3.75; 
7-16 inch, $3.55; 1-2 inch, $3.35; 9-16 
inch, $3.30; 5-8 inch, $3.20; 3-4 inch, 
$3.05; 7-8 inch, $3.00; 1 inch, $2.95. . 

Shot — The price still remains at net 
list. 

Skates — Trade has eased off consider- 
ably since the Christmas rush. We 
quote ftom 25c. to $2.50, according to 
quality. 

Sleigh Bells— We quote: Back straps, 
30c. to $2.50; body straps, 70c. to $3.50; 
York Eye bells, common, 70c. to $1.50, 
pear shape, $1.15 to $2.00; shaft gongs, 
20c. to $2.50; Grelots, 35c. to $2.00; 
team bells. $1.80 to $5.50; saddle gongs, 
$1.10 to $2.60. 

Horse Blankets -Our nrioes are: Jute, 
unlined, $4.50; 3-4 lined, $9.50; full lin- 
ed, $12; 16-oz. Hessian, unlined, $6.50: 
3-4 lined, $11.50; full lined, $14, and 
up to $24 ; Kersey blankets, $9 to $21 ; all 
wool, $24, $30, $48 and $60. 

Snowshoes— The demand has been 
tremendous, satisfying the jobbers to 
the full. Of course, sales now are some- 
what slack, however. We quote from 
$15 to $35 per dozen pairs, according to 
quality. 

Ontario Hardware Markets. 

office of Hardware and Metal, 

10 Front Street East- 
Toronto. Jan. 5. 1906 

Builders' hardware manufacturers in 
the United States have advanced prices 
10 per cent, and while there has been 
no corresponding advance here, as yet, 
some jobbers are already marking up 
theii selling figures, realizing that it 
will be impossible to replace stocks in 
hand at the old prices. There seems to 
be an upward tendency in practically 
all lines, and retailers who are nOAV 
stocktaking, should revise their selliug 
prices in accordance with present mar- 
ket conditions. 

Jobbers report trade to be fair for 
this season, but do not look for any large 
movement of goods during January. The 
outlook for Spring trade is very hope- 
ful, however. 

Axes and Handles— A normal trade is 
being done with prices the same. 

Cutlery — Prospects for the coining 
season are good. 

Sporting Goods Skates are not in 



January 6, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



such strong demand, and there is noi 
much being- done in shooting materials 
i r fishing tackle. 

Washing Machines— The outlook for 
next season's business is satisfactory. 

Chain — We are still quoting prices 
as follows: 1 inch, $6.00; 5-6 inch, 
$4.45; 3-8 inch, $3.85; 7-16 inch, $3.70: 
1-2 inch, $3.55; 9-16 inch, $3.45; 5-8 
inch, $3.35; 3-4 inch, $3.25. 

Extension and Step Ladders — Trices 
continue as follows: Step ladders 
at 10c. per foot for 3 to 6 feet, and 
lie. per foot for 7 to 10 feet ladders. 
Waggoner extension ladders, 40 per cent, 
off.' 

Galvanized Wire— Quotations con- 
tinue unchanged at $2.42 1-2 f.o.b. 
Cleveland. In barb and coil spring wire 
a seasonable trade is being' transacted. 

Wire Nails — A good trade is being- 
done for this season. We still quote: 
$2.15 per keg, f.o.b. Toronto. 

Cut Nails — A satisfactory volume 
of business is being done. We quote : 
$2.40 per keg, f.o.b. Toronto. 

Horse Nails— Trade is quiet. Dis- 
counts remain the same. 

Horseshoes — Trade continues brisk: 
prices firm. We quote : P.B. base, $3.65 : 
"M.R.M. Co.. latest improved pattern" 
Iron shoes, lierrit and medium pattern. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.05; snow No. 2 and larger. 
$4.05; No. 1 and smaller, $4.30: light 
steel shoes. No. 2 and larger, $4.15: No. 
1 and smaller. $4.40; featherweieht. all 
sixes, to 4. $5.75; toe weicht, all sizes. 
1 to 4. $7.00. If shipped from factory 
15c. less. 

S-addlery— Sleighbells, horse blankets 
and similar goods are having a season- 
able sale. 

Screws — Advancing prices in metals 
make the market very firm, hut prices 
are unchanged. 

Rivets and Burrs — There have been 
iin price changes, and trade is satisfac- 
tory for this season. 

Bolts and Nuts— Stocks are light and 
a heavy trade is looked for during the 
Spring. 

Cordage— Sorting orders are plenti- 
ful. We still quote: Manila, 15c; 
British manila, 11 l-2c; sisal, 10 l-2c; 
double lathyarn, 10 l-2c; single lath- 
yarn. 10c; sashcord, "Hercules," 30c 
to 32c; "Star," 36c; cotton twine. 
3-ply, 24c; 4-ply, 29c; calking cotton, 
16 1-2 to 17c; cotton waste, colored. 
6 3-4c ; white, 9c 

Cement— Trade is seasonable. Our 
quotations continue: For carload orders 
f.o.b. Toronto, Canadian Portland, $1.90 
to $12.00; American Portland, $1.90 to 
$2.00. For small orders ex warehouse, 
Canadian Portland, $2.1 1). American 
Portland, $2.10. 

Firebrick— Prices continue unchanged; 
English and Scotch firebrick. 27c to 
30c; American low-grade, 22c to 25c: 
high-grade, 27 l-2c. to 37 l-2c 

Building Paper— A fair trade is being 
done, the open weather keeping the de- 
mand lively. Prices are the same. 

Hides— The general tendency of the 



market is one of weakness. Country 

hides have fallen 1 -2c. to 1 c. There are 

still indications of increased arrivals, 
whilst demand is onlv maintained at 
steadying point, so that the strengthen- 
ing feature is absent. Chicago is con- 
tinuing lii in at previous low basis, but 
shows little indication of advance. We 
quote : 

Hides, inspected, steers, No. 1 11 

No. 2 10 

" cows, No. 1 10 

No. 2 09» 

Country hides, flat, per lb 09 ( 9 l 

Calfskins, No. 1, selected 13{ 

" No. 2 11 

Sheep skins 1 20 1 25 

Horse hides, No. 1 3 00 3 25 

Rendered tallow, per lb 04 04 

P>Uled wools, super, per lb 22 C 24l 



24 % 



Fur Skins. 



No. 1. No. 2. No. 3. No. 4. 

Badger $0 50 $0 10 *. . . . * . . . 

Bear Black 18 00 12 00 4 00 1 00 

" " 15 00 8 00 3 00 

" Year 7 00 5 00 2 00 30 

Fisher 600 400 2 00 100 

Fox Red 2 50 1 50 50 20 

" Cross 500 400 200 50 

Lynx 4 00 2 75 150 50 

Marten Dark 10 00 5 00 2 00 50 

Pale 4 00 2 75 1 25 50 

Mink Dark 5 00 4 00 2 75 1 50 

" Pale 3 25 2 50 150 30 

Muskrat Spring 20 15 .... 03 

" Winter 15 11 .... 03 

" Out. & E. Fall.. 12c to 13 8c 09 .... 03 

" N.W.T.&W." ..lie to 12 7c 08 .... 03 

Rabbit 01 00J 

Raccoon 1 25 70 30 10 

Skunk 160 100 50 20 

Weasel White 50 25 10 04 

Wolf Timber 1 50 75 40 20 

" Prairie 100 50 70 

Wolverine 4 00 2 50 1 00 '25 



Canadian Metal Markets. 

QUEBEC. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 5, 1906. 

Everything is still lively in metal cir- 
cles, the many holidays having, had but 
little effect on orders. Jobbers and im- 
porters are delighted with their show- 
ing and all declare that business is 
phenomenal for this time of the year. 

Pig lead is again very firm, though 
a slight weakness developed a few days 
ago. Conditions at present warrant us 
in returning to our figures of last week, 
and we have consequently made no 
change in quotations. 

Tin also eased off early in the week, 
hut it, too. lias recovered its strength 
and is to-dav quoted at the same figures 
as last week. Antimony has advanced 
in foreign markets and Canadian jobbers 
have been forced to raise their figures 
slightly. 

Copper has again advanced, the prices 
on small quantities being l-2c. higher 
than last week. Other metals are about 
as formerly. 

Canada Plates — Our prices remain 



a'S follows: 



:>_' s, 



$2.60 : 



60 's. 



$2.65; 75 's, $2.75; full polished. $3.75: 
galvanized. 52 's, $4.10: 60 's. $4.35. 

Copper — The price on small quantities 
has been advanced, and we are now quot- 
ing : Ingot copper 20 l-2c, to 21;c : 
sheet copper, base sizes, 25c. 

Ingot Tin— Although a weakening was 
reported in this metal a few days ago, 
it has recovered its tone, and we are 
again ouoting 39 l-2e. to 40c. 

Pig Lead— As in the case of tin, a 
drop occurred in lead, but a quick re- 
covery has brought the price back' to 
from $4.75 to $4.80 per 100 pounds. 

25 



Boiler Tubes— It is still extremely 
difficult to gel deliveries in reasonable 
time. 'I he price on 3 1-2 inch tubes is 
l-4c. higher than at our lasi report. VY\: 
are quoting as follows : Bril isli and 
American tubes, 1 1-2 inch. 8 l-2c: _' 
inch, 8 l-2c; 2 1-2 inch. 10c; 3 inch. 
12c; 3 1-2 inch. 15 3-4c ; 1 inch, 20c; 
5 inch, 45c Price per foot net. 

Pig Iron— Bookings at present are 
\ ery light. We are si ill quo! ing: 

"Dom.."No. i. $19. 50 to $20.00 delivered Montrea 

Usual difference in prioe for lower grades. 
Ferrona No. 1 $19 50 delivered Montreal. 

No. a 19 00 

No. 3 18 so 

No. 4 18.00 

Londonderry 20.50 " " 

Carron No. 1 23.00 " " 

(special) 22.00 

Summerlee No. 1 23.50 " *' 

Clarence No. 1 20.(0 " " 

No- 3 io . so 

Tool Steel— We quote: . Colonial 
Black Diamond, 8c. to 9c; Sanderson's. 
8c. to 45c, according to grade; Jessop's. 
13c; Jonas & Colver's. 10c. to 20c: 
"Air Hardening," 65c. ner lb.; Con- 
queror, 7 l-2c; Conqueror High Speed 
Steel, 60c 

Merchant Steel- We are still quoting- 
Sleigh shoe. $2.17 1-2; tire, $2.27 1-2; 
spring, $2.75; toecalk, $2.82 1-2: ma- 
chinery iron finish, $2.27 1-2; ruled ma- 
chinery steel, $2.75; mild, $2.17 1-2 and 
upwards; square harrow tooth, $2.27 1-2. 
Net cash 30 days. Rivet steel quoted on 
application. 

Cold Rolled Shafting— We quote : Cold 
rolled shafting, 3-4 inch to 7-16, $3.75 
per 100 lbs.; inch and a half to 3 inch. 
$3.50 per 100 lbs. 

Galvanized Iron— In spite of high 
prices, the demand is good, and the tone 
remains very firm. Our quota- 
tions are as follows: Queen's Head, 
28 gauge, $4.25; 26 gauge, $4.00; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.50; 
A) olio. 28 gauge, $4.10: 26 gauge, $3.85; 
22 and 24 gauge, $3.8."); 16 to 20 gauge, 
$3.50; Fleur-de-Lis. 28 gauge, $4.10; 26 
gauge, $3.8."); 22 to 24 gauge, $3.60; 16 
to 20 gauge. $3.35; Comet. 28 gauge, 
$3.85; 26 gauge, $3.60; 22 and 24 gauge. 
$3.35; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.10; Bell brand. 
28 gauge, $4.20 to $4.25; Gorbal's "Best 
Best," 28 gauge, $4.10. "Windmill 
Best," 28 gauge, $3.95; Sword and 
Torch, 28 gauge, $4.05; in less than case 
lots 25c extra. 

Black Sheets— We are still quoting. 28 
gauge, $2.40; 26 gauge, $2.35: 22-24 
gauge, $2.30; 19-20 gauge, $2.30; 8-10 
gauge, $2.45. 

Antimony— Still further advances in 
the Old Country have resulted in in- 
creased prices being demanded bv Mont- 
real jobbers. We are now quoting: 14 
l-4c. to 14 l-2c. for Cookson's. 

Tin Plates— We nuote the following 
prices: Cokes, base size, 1C, 14 x 20. 
$4.00; charcoal, base size, 1C, 14 x 20, 
$4.25. 

Terne Plates— We are still quoting 
$6.85. 

Ingot Zinc— Xo^ further change in con- 
ditions has materialized during the 
week. Demand is very strong. Our 
prices arc 7c. to 7 l-4c 



Hardware and Metal 



THB MARKETS 



January 6, 1906 



Sheet Zinc— Wo still quote 8c. in 
casks; 8 L-4c. in less than casks. 

Sheet Lead— Wo arc quoting: '_' 1-2 
lbs., 5 1--V. by the roll; 3 lbs. and heav- 
ier, 5 l-4c. by the roll: large quantities, 
26c. per hundred pounds. 

Bar Iron— The strength of the iron 
rcarkel has boon so strong thaj prices 
in bar iron have boon advanced and we 
are now quoting $2.00 f.o.b. Montreal. 

Old Material— Conditions in wrought 
and oast iron scrap are the same as at 
our la>t report. Rubber also remains 
stationary, and it is difficult to say just 
what turn the market will take. Scrap 
zino will likely advance sharply when 
dealers try to till contracts now in hand. 
h is believed thai the stock will fall be- 
low the estimate. Both zino and lead 
arc in ready demand. I'ur quota- 
tions are as follows: Copper wire, 14 
:;-lo.: Unlit copper, 13 3-4c; heavy red 
biass, 1 ■!<■■: yellow brass, 9 3-4c; 
limit brass, 7 1 2c; load. 3c; zinc, 
'.: machinery cast scrap, $13; 
wrought scrap, $12; stove plate scrap, 
$] 1 : mixed rags, 75c. to 90c per 100 lbs.; 
old rubbers. 7 l-4c. to 7 l-2o. 



ONTARIO. 

i MBoe o* Hahhw are .ink Mktal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto. Jan. 5. 1906. 

Demand for all classes of ingot metals 
continues very active, while the call for 
sheet- is also very biisk. Jobbers re- 
porl good sales out of stocks in hand, 
despite the break into the week caused 
by the holiday. 

Pig lead and tin weakened during- the 
week, but recovered, and are now in 
practically the same condition as a week 
ago. Zinc spelter has advanced again 
and is now firm at 7 l-2c. for foreign. 
Antimony is also firmer this week than 
last, and some jobbers are asking an 
advance of 15 l-2c. 

Few orders are being booked at pre- 
sent, but old business in hand will keep 
the mills busy for many months. 

Middlesboro, f.o.b., Toronto *22 50 

Hamilton, No. 1, at furnace 20 00 

No. 2, " 19 50 

Midland, No. 1, " 20 00 

No. 2, " 19 50 

Radnor, at furnace 31 50 

Londonderry, f.o.b. Toronto 2158 

Bar Iron— An advance is predicted, 
but we are still quoting $2.00 base, 
f.o.b. Toronto, with discount of 2 per 
cent, not cash. 

Ingot Tin — .Market continues active, 
and wo still quote 40c. per lb. 

Tin Plates — The open weather is re- 
sulting in a large demand. Trices arc 
firm. 

Galvanized Sheets— Conditions are un- 
changed, the demand being heavy at '.he 
same quotations. 

Brass— Jobbers report trade satisfac- 
tory, discounts continuing at 10 per cent. 

Lead — Lead has fluctuated during 
the week, but quotations continue as 
follows: Pig load, $4.85 per 100 lbs., 
and bar bad. $5.00 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter- Another l-4c. advance 
has been made, and we now quote 7-£c. 
per lb. for Ionian and 5 1-2 to 5 3-4c 
I er lb. for domestic. 

Copper — Buying of both sheet and 



ingol copper is quite brisk, with stocks 
not very large. Wo are quoting as fol- 
low-: [ngol copper, $20 per 100 lbs., ami 
-boot copper, $25 per 100 lbs. 

Anitomy- An advance of another L-2c. 
bas been made in some quarters, ami 
the ruling quotation is now 15$c. 

Old Material Goods are moving ac- 
tively for llii- Season, copper being in 
strong demand. Dealers' buying prices 
areas follows: Heavy cupper and wire, 
1 le. per lb.: light copper, 13c. per lb.; 
heavy red brass, 12 l-2c. per lb.; heavy 
3'ellow brass, 10c. per lb.; light brass, 
8 l-2c. per lb.; tea lead, $3.00 per 100 
lbs.; heavy lead, $3.25 per 100 lbs.; 
^crap zinc, 4c. per lb. ; iron, No. 1 
wrought, $10.50, No. 2 wrought $3 to $5; 
machinery cast scrap, $15; stove plate. 
$10; malleable and steel, $5; old rub- 
bers, 7c. to 7 l-4c. per lb.; country mix- 
ed rags, 75c. per 100 lbs. 

Coal — Prices keep very firm, and 
we still, quote: Anthracite in cars 
at bridges, grate, $5.50 per gross 
Ion; pea, $3.7.") per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.70; 3-4 inch, 
$1.60, run of mine, $1.40; nut, $1.25: 
N.P. and S., $1.00; slack, 75c; box cars 
10c. per ton additional. 

Youdiioghenv soft coal in cars, bond- 
ed at the bridges: 1 1-4 inch, $2.80; 3-4 
inch, $2.70; mine run, $2.60; slack, $2.35. 

For Manitoba, British Columbia and 
Maritime Provinces markets see pages 
following. 

LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

From Metal Market Report, January 2, 1906. 

PIG IRON— Cleveland warrants are 
quoted at 54s. 9d, and Glasgow stan- 
dard warrants at 53s lOd, making prices 
as compared with last week Is. l^d 
higher for Cleveland warrants and Is. 
3d higher for standard warrants. 

TIN— Spot tin opened strong at £162 
17s. 6d, futures at £163, and after 
sales of 300 tons of spot and 500 tons 
of futures closed steady at £163 for 
spot and £163 7s. 6d for futures, mak- 
ing price as compared with last week 
10s. higher on spot and £1 17s. 6d 
higher on futures. 

COPPER— Spot copper opened strong 
at €80 5s, futures £79 17s. 6d, and 
after sales of 400 tons of spot and 600 
tons of futures closed quiet at £80 2s. 
(id lor spot and £79 15s. for futures, 
making price as compared with last 
week £1 2s. 6d higher on spot and £1 
5s. higher on futures. 

LEAD— The market closed at £17 
10s., making- price as compared with 
last week unchanged. 

SPELTER— The market closed at 
£29 7s. 6d, making price as compared 
with last week 15s. higher. 

UNITED STATES METAL MARKETS 

A'lranot proofs furnished Hardwarb and Metal by 
Ths Iron Age, January 4, 1906. 

The volume of business done in near- 
ly all the leading distributing centres 
during the pasl week has been much 
larger than is usual in the holiday sea- 
sou, and the industry outers the new 
year under tremendous oressure. 

26 



In the Pittsburg district negotiations 
are still progressing between the mer- 
chant furnaces and the Steel Corpora- 
tion. 'I he latter interest is on the eve 
of closing l'"i- -i considerable tonnage of 
basic pig- to cover the requirements thus 
far unprovided for for the eastern plants 
I'm the liisl ball' of the year. Some 
other sales of basic pig have been made 
in Eastern Pennsylvania at dose to $18 
delivered, and there have been marketed 

also with two consumers an aggregate 
of 5,000 tons of low phosphorus iron 
on l!ie basis of $23 at furnace. The 
leading makers of foundry and forge 
iron in the Schuylkill and Lehigh Val- 
leys have advanced their prices 25 cents 
per ton, and have effected sales at the 
advance. The cast iron pipe interests 
are buying both in the east and in the 
central west, Cincinnati noting an in- 
quiry for 18,000 tons. 

Hail makers report additional orders, 
the largest this week being for 15,000 
tons for the Oklahoma Central. It is 
now definitely announced that the Balti- 
more & Ohio order negotiated some time 
since is for 71,000 tons. 

Bridge builders are active. How heavy 
has been the business of the year just 
passed is indicated by the fact that the 
American Bridge Company booked dur- 
ing 1905 an aggregate of 540,000 tons. 
Its capacity, which was enlarged during 
the year, is now placed at close to 700,- 
000 'tons. 

During the past few Aveeks the Ger- 
man Steel Syndicate has sold 20,000 
tons additional of structural shapes, 
making the total since the movement be- 
gan, about 60,000 tons. This is exclusive 
of the business in the same line done by 
representatives of Belgian mills. The 
German Syndicate has advanced the 
price to £6, c.i.f., equal to about 1.80c. 
per lb., duty paid, New York. 

One of the leading eastern plate 
mills has just decided to ask an ad- 
vance of $2 per ton on all heavy plates, 
and $5 per ton on No. 10 plates. On 
the lakes the ship-builders are figuring 
on two additional boats. 

The makers of cold rolled shafting 
have just received a number of heavy 
contracts from customers for delivery 
over the first half of the year. 

The wire makers are expected to an- 
nounce an advance of $1 per ton at. an 
early date. It is stated that the putting 
up of the mice has boon virtually de- 
cided upon. 



A TOOL NOVELTY. 

The attention of the trade is called 
to "Aul-u-want," a new tool novelty, 
by the Canadian wholesale agency, 
which is at 79 Front Street East. To- 
ronto. This useful, little sewing tool is 
an English invention, and is invaluable 
to farmers, and others who wish to re- 
pair their own boots and harness. The 
illustration on another page explains 
the principle of the "Awl-u-want." A 
curved awl is also used, by which a 
patch may be sown on the outside of a 
shoe, entirely from the outside. This 
little article should prove .a profitable 
line for any hardware merchant to 
handle, 



January 6, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



British Columbia Trade News 

Vancouver, B.C., Dec. 29, l'JU5. 

To clear decks tor stock-taking is the 

chief aim of the hardwaremen just now. 
The holiday trade was very active and 
satisfactory, and now the rush is over, 
the yearly straightening up is com- 
mencing. Trade is necessarily quiet at 
the moment, retail merchants restrict- 
ing their buying to actual needs until 
after the close of the year's business. 



Much interest is evoked by the an- 
nouncement that the gross production of 
mines in British Columbia is estimated 
to exceed $'20,000,000, more than twice 
the output of the Klondike. Last year 
the mineral production of the province 
was $18,977,359. The marked increase 
in production of copper, lead and silver 
will more than offset any anticipated re- 
duction in the gold output. There was a 
production of the precious metal last 
year of $5,700,000. This is likely to be 
less for 1905. in silver-lead districts 
there was a great revival this year. The 
Dominion bounty on lead had a strong 
influence. Following that the price also 
enhanced, until a short time ago the 
price was quoted at £16 per ton in Lon- 
don. According to the automatic sche- 
dule the bounty ceased when the metal 
reached that price. 

In the Rossland camp over 330,000 
tons will be the total, and in the 
Boundary it is expected to reach if not 
surpass the million ton mark. Add to 
this the fact that the Granby company, 
the largest concern operating in the 
Boundary, has declared a dividend of 
$105,000. In the Kootenay, the Hall 
mines at Nelson have turned a deficit of 
$20,000 in 1903 to a profit of $30,000 in 
the year ended, besiues greatly improv- 
ing its smelter at Nelson. The St. 
Kugene and the Sullivan in East Koote- 
nay and the Ferguson in the Lardeau 
are mines which are acting vigorously 
and will be paying dividends shortly. In 
other sections similar progress is mark- 
ed. 

* » * 

The International Coal & Coke Co. 
at Coleman, Alberta, on the Crow's 
Nest Pass Railway, is doubling its coke 
oven capacity by adding a hundred more 
ovens. The mine is supplying the C.P. 
ft. and various smelters with coal and 
coke, its output being 1,000 tons per 
day. The company owns 10,000 acres of 
coal lands and the engineers estimate 
that there are 60,000,000 tons now in 
sight above the level of the valley. This 
would suffice for 50 years, and the lower 
levels, which can be profitably reached 
by tunneling, would go to a depth of 
2,000 feet. The recent discovery of large 
iron ore deposits in the same region in- 
dicates the possibility of an iron indus- 
try being established in the near future, 
and already English people interested in 
the industry have been buying there. 



Cumberland, the town north of Na- 
naimo on Vancouver Island, is exper- 
iencing a large degree of prosperity just 
now owing to the rapid development of 
the Dunsmuir coal mines there. The de- 
posit of anthracite coal, the first to be 
worked on the coast, is now showing up 
well. Months of hard work had to be 
put in because of the vein faulting, but 
the development lias reached solid ore 



•advise "Metallic" lines 



Have you drummed up "Metallic" Building Materials yet to 
the farmers in your district ? 

Many of them are going to put up some barns or other farm 
buildings, sure, or perhaps going to re-roof some old ones or put on 
siding. 

It ought not to require much talk, when backed by samples, 
to show them why sheet metal is the right stuff for roofing or siding 
and why the "Metallic" brand is best. He's been reading our ads. 
Suggest it to him and show our catalogue. 

Samples — if you haven't them — sent free. 

Profits on our line are large — no stock to carry — catalogue 
makes the sale. 



OUR NEW We have just issued the most complete 

$10 OOO Catalogue ever offered to the Metal Trade. 

rjrj/nr//e * l ' s a veritable encyclopaedia of all that's 
l*ATALUL*UE practical and beautiful in the Art Manipu- 
lation of Sheet Metal. Book contains 440 pages, superbly 
bound and illustrated. We send it free upon request, to 
any builder, contractor or dealer of responsibility. 

THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. 

OF CANADA, Limited 

(Established Twenty Years) 

Toronto and Winnipeg 



We also manufacture: 

" Eastlake " Metallic Shingles 

" Metallic " Ceilings and Wall Plates 

"Metallic" Cornices, Skylights and 

Ventilators 
"Metallic" Sheet Metal Fronts 
" Metallic" Siding, (Stone, Brick, etc.) 
"Impervia" Fireproof Windows 
" Empire" Metallic Shingles 
" Metallic " Crestings and Finials 
"Metallic" Corrugated iron 
"Hayes" Metallic Lathing 
" Metallic "Eavetroughand Conductor 

Pipe 
" Metallic" Pressed Zinc Ornaments 
" Richardson's " Pressed Metal Doors 

and Sheet Metal Building Materials 

of every description. 

418 



now, and the coal continues good. Addi- 
tional plant is being installed, including 
a line of railway five miles long lo bring 
the coal down to connect with the short 
line railway to Union Bay. A washer is 
being put in at the bay where the bunk- 
ers are being built. 

» * 

Great interest attaches to recent de- 
velopment work in the oil fields of 
Southwestern Alberta and Southeastern 
British Columbia. This little corner of 
the two provinces is being prospected as 
thoroughly and rapidly as the difficulties 
of bad transportation in a roadless, 
mountainous region will permit. Seven 
or eight companies are spending money 
on driving wells, and two of them at 
least have already struck very promis- 
ing quantities of oil. The Western Oil & 
Coal Co., in which many Vancouver citi- 
zens are interested, is one of the lucky 
explorers. They have a well down f,450 
feet, and Mr. J. B. Ferguson, general 
manager, says ' that possibly several 
barrels of oil per day could be pumped 
up. The boring is now in sandstone of 
very promising appearance. Gas in quan- 
tities is liberated by the boring, and it 
can be ignited at any time, sending up 
a sheet of flame twenty feet in the air. 
Stories that Standard Oil has already 
secured control of these new oil fields 
are denied by owners of locations there. 
* , * 

The V., W. & Y. Railway, as the 
Great Northern's construction line in 
the coast district of British Columbia is 
known, will apply to the provincial leg- 
islature for a land grant in aid of its 
proposed extension north to the interior 
of the province, ft is said by officials 
that the road will connect with the G. 
T. P. or the Canadian Northern, ac- 
cording to which one gets into the ter- 
ritory first. Last session the legislature 
refused to consider a grant, of 1 5,000 
acres per mile, asked for by the road. 

27 



A much less amount is to be asked for- 
tius time. 

The Great Northern is actively prose- 
cuting its extensions in (he direction of 
connecting the Kootenay and Boundary 
districts with the coast. The short line 
from Cloverdale to Sunras, designed to 
connect with the N.P.R. which now has 
to come into Vancouver by the C.P.K.'s 
Mission branch, is being built, and work 
on the Midway-Princeton section is still 
progressing, so that the Similkameen 
will be reached before long. 

The latest rumor is that the Great 
Northern branch, now at Fernie, would 
be extended to reach Calgary, and thus 
tap the wheat country, anticipating the 
commencement of the western movement 
of Alberta's wheat crop. This rumor is 
somewhat indorsed by local movements 
in which it is said Mr. Hill is personally 
interested. These are said to plan a 
large export flour mill and elevator on 
water front property adjoining the 
Hastings saw mill site, which is alreadv 
owned by the Great Northern and which 
is to be its harbor front connection 
* * * 

Further developments in the endeavor 
to compel payment of export dues on 
logs shipped out of British Columbia oc- 
curred last week by the seizure at Na- 
naimo of a quantity of logs owned by 
J. S. Emerson, after the fug which had 
them in tow had cleared for Anacortes, 
Wash. The case is to be heard shortly, 
when the owner will attempt to show 
that the instruction was a mistake and 
that he did not intend shipping the logs 
out of the province. The present is the 
third or fourth seizure of the same oper- 
ator's logs. He has been taking the 
ground that the Government is acting 
illegally in making seizures, as they can- 
not say that the logs are to be export- 
ed, nor can they, he claims, seize them 
so long as they are in the country. So 
far be has paid up the dues and set t led 
the costs each time. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 6, 1906 



11 EFORIi you are many days 
"■-^ older, you'll have a copy of 
our new Brush Hook, — shows more 
kinds of better brushes than any 
supply house ever sent you yet — fact ! 
Right on the heels of the book 
you'll probably see our salesman, — 
he may mention brushes to you, — 
please be good to him. 

If he and the book don't show 
you, — don't prove to you — that we 
can sell you more brush quality for 
every dollar than you ever bought 
before, don't be good to him, and 
do throw away the book. 

We have bought our stocks at 
prices that must have hurt some- 
body badly, — but don't you care for 
that. We have closed out some big 
makers for spot cash, — others we've 
taken whole outputs from in car- 
lots. 

Never had such a brush stock — 
never were fixed to quote so low for 
such values. Assortment is big 
enough for any dealer, — no matter 
what kind of a trade he sells, — 
prices are where you won't think 
twice of competition. Big talk — 
but true talk. 

And every brush we sell we guar- 
antee, — that means we replace any 
brush that any customer of yours 
kicks about, if the kick is halfway 
reasonable. 

Please read the book, when it 
comes, — and talk to the man, when 
he comes. 

If you happen to want anything 
between now and then, our mail 
order department will take mighty 
good care of you, — it ships every 
order the day we get it, and the 
same old Stephens guarantee covers 
all it ships. 



Hardware and Metal Conditions in Manitoba. 

(Market quotations oorreoted by telegraph up to 12 a.m. Friday, Jan. 5, 190G.) 

Office of Hardware and Metal 

Room 511, Union Bank Building, 

Winnipeg, Man. 



G. F. STEPHENS & GO. 



LIMITED 



WINNIPEG, CANADA 



Values show hui lew ami unimportant 
dianges throughout the entire liar '\, are 
and metal list, conditions showing n« 
change during the week and trade being 
steady hut quiet, with uo features of 
importance. The trade appears to be. 
well satislied with the year's business 
and states that it was the best in years. 
'1 he eailv Spring business is expected 
to he heavy. 

Game Traps— A few game traps are 
still selling. Prices are unchanged. We 
quote: 

H. &N., discount 50 and 5 p.c. 

Victor, " 66^ p.c. 

Newhouse, " 35 P- c - 

Bear $7 each 

Lanterns— The market is "open" and 
it is hard to quote with anything ap- 
proaching to exactitude. The average 
prices are about as follows: 

Cold blast lanterns $5 25 per doz. 

Coppered cold blast lanterns .. 7 25 

Cold blast dash 7 75 

Lift Lanterns 4 25 

Bluestone— Price for 1906 delivery is 
$6.50 per cwt. 

Wire— Prices are steady. We quote: 

Barbed wire, ioo lb $3 oo 

Plain galvanized, 6 to 8.. $3 39 9.. $2 50 2 90 

" " 10 3 50 ia.. 3 10 

' 13 3 20 14.. 3 9° 

15 4 45 16.. 4 60 

Plain twist 3 O0 

Staples 3 5° 

Oiled annealed wire, 10.. $2 96 11.. $1 02 

" " 12.. 3 10 13.. 3 20 

' " 14- • 3 3° IS-- 3 45 
Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horseshoes— Prices have been steady 
since the recent advance in steel shoes. 
Quotations are as follows: 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 $4 65 

No. 2 and larger .... 44° 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 90 

No. 2 and larger 4 6 5 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 5 °° 

No. 2 and larger 4 75 

Horsenails— Discounts are as follows: 
"C" brand, 40, 10 and 7 1-2 per cent., 
"M" brand and other brands, 55 and 
b'O per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

Wire Nails— The price has been steady 
since the recent decline to $2.60 per keg. 

Cut Nails— Price, $3.00 per keg, base 
price. None selling because of the low 
price of wire nails. 

Pressed Spikes— Prices are firmly held 
at following quotations: 

Pressed spikes, y t x 5 and 6 $4 6o 

" 5-6 x s, 6 and 7 4 25 

'• " ^x6,7and8... 41° 

" 7-16 x 7 and 9 400 

*' \i x 8, 9, 10 and 12 3 90 

" Hxioandi2 375 

Screws— No change in price. Demand 
continues brisk at following unchanged 
discounts : 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 

26 



Nuts and Bolts— Discounts are un- 
changed and continue as follows: 

Bolts, carriage, J4 or smaller 60 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, ji and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-r6 and over 55 p.c. 

Bolts, tire 65 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 p.c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2jic. " 

Hex " case lots 3c. 

" smaller lots 254c. " 

Rivets— Discounts continue as follows: 

Rivets, iron 60 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

' ' No. 12 37 

Coil Chain — Unchanged in price. We 
quote: 

i^uii cnaii — 

3-16 inch $9 25 X inch $7 20 

5-16 inch .... s 20 yi inch .... 4 60 

7-16 inch .... 4 45 H inch .... 4 30 

H inch 410 Ji inch .... 4 00 

Shovels— Discounts on spades and 
shovels continue 40 and 5 per cent. 

Harvest Tools— Discounts are now 60 
and 5 per cent. 

Axe Handles— Quoted as follows: 

Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz 53 I 5 

No. 1 1 90 No. a 1 60 

Octagon extra. 230 No. 1 1 60 

Axes — Prices are quoted as follows: 

Bench axes, discount off list 40 p.c. 

Broad " " " 25 p.c. 

Royal Oak, per doz $ 6.25 

Maple Leaf, " 8.25 

Model " 8.50 

Black Prince " 7.25 

Black Diamond " 9.25 

Standard Flint Edge, per doz 8.75 

Copper King, per doz 9.00 

Columbian, 10.75 

Handled axes, North Star, per doz 7.75 

" Black Prince, per doz 9.25 

" " Standard Flint Edge, per doz. . 10.50 
" " Copper King, per doz n. co 

Butts— The discount on wrought iron 
butts is 70 per cent. 

Churns— The discounts from list prices 
are 45 and 5 per cent. 

Chisels— Quoted at 70 per cent, off list 
prices. 

Auger Bits— Discount on common 
auger bits is 65 per cent. 

Blocks— Discount on steel blocks is 
35 per cent, off list prices; on wood, 55 
per cent. 

Fittings— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows: 

Wrought Couplings 60 p.c. 

Nipples 65 and 10 p.c. 

T'sand elbows 10 p.c. 

Malleable bushings 5° P- c - 

Malleable unions 60 p.c. 

Grindstones— The price is now 1 3-4c. 
per lb. 

Fork Handles— The discount is 40 per 
cent, from list prices. 

Hinges— The discount in light "T" 
and strap hinges is 65 per cent, off list 
prices. 



January 6, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



Hooks — Prices are quoted as follows: 

Brush hooks, heavy, per doz $8.75 

Grass " per doz 1.70 

Draw Knives— The discount is 70 per 
cent, from list prices. 

Rules — Discounts are 50 and 10 per 
cent. 

Washers— On small quantities the dis- 
count is 35 per cent.; on full boxes it is 
40 per cent. 

Wringers— Prices are as follows: 

Royal Canadian, per doz $30.00 

R. B., per doz 34-75 

Files — Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows: 

" Arcade " 75 p.c. 

" Black Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62 K p.c. 

Building Paper— The big rush is of 

course over, but there is still a steady 

sale at unchanged prices. We quote : 

Joliette, plain 40c. 

'' tarred 65c. 

Cyclone, plain 55c. 

" tarred 80c. 

Anchor, plain 55c. 

" tarred 65c. 

Pure fibre, plain 60c. 

" " tarred 80c. 

Tinware, Etc.— We quote again as fol- 
lows: 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 ana 10 p.c. 

" plain , .. 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37M p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c. 

Imperial 6a p.c. 

Cordage— The price is steady since the 
recent advance. We quote as follows. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 11 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 75 

Lathy arn II 25 

Solder— Quoted now at 24c. per lb. 
with concessions for large quantities. 

Corrugated Roofing and Siding- 
Prices are still quoted as follows: 

ROOFING. 

(Lengths 3, 4, 5 and 8 ft.) 

Painted Galvanized 

28 gauge $2 85 $390 

26 " 310 415 

24 " 3 80 5 40 

(Any lengths under 4 ft. 10c. per 
square additional.) 

Painted Galvanized 
28 gauge pressed seam. . . $3 00 $4 20 

28 " "V" crimp 295 415 

SIDINGS. 
( Plain brick, rock face brick or stone 17^ x 23.) 
Painted Galvanized 

No. 1 78 to the square $3 00 $4 30 

2 69 " " .... 2 75 3 90 

' 3 55 " .... 2 40 3 60 

(Large sheets 28 in. x 60 in.) 

Painted Galvanized 
28 gauge $3 00 $4 05 

BEADED CEILING. 

28 gauge, painted red 3 10 

Vises— Prices are quoted as follows: 

" Peter Wright," 30 to 34 14KC. per lb. 

351039 14c. 

" 40 and larger 13HC " 

Anvils— "Peter Wright" anvils are 
selling at lie. per lb. 

Power Horse Clippers— The "1902" 
power horse clipper is selling at $12, 
and the "Twentieth Century" at $8. 
The "1904" sheep shearing machines 
are sold at $13.60. 

Ammunition, Etc.— Shot has been ad- 
vanced 25 cents per cwt. Other prices 
and discounts are unchanged. We quote: 



WINDOW GUARDS, 






OFFICE RAILING, 






IRON GATES, 




WIRE 


FENCING, 
COAL SCREENS, 

SPRING BEDS 






AND MATTRESSES 


MUNRO WIRE WORKS, 


Limited 


WINNIPEG, MAN. 


NEW GLASGOW, N.S 





ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

AND ARCHITECTS* SUPPLIES, ETC. 

We carry a complete line of WINSOR & NEWTON'S 
and other leading manufacturers' goods in stock. Ask for 
our new catalogue. 

THE WINNIPEG PAINT AND GLASS CO., LIMITED 

WINNIPEG, CANADA 



WINNIPEG CEILING and ROOFING CO. 



Manufacturers of 



Corrugated Roofing and Siding, Metal 

Ceilings, Cornices, Etc. 

WINNIPEG, - MAN. 




The WHITE Brand 

Two Styles—' 4 Standard Page," and " Page Empire." 

Double strength Wire ; coiled for elasticity ; Wire is not injured at joints ; 
joints cannot slip; best galvanizing; all painted. 3,290,000 rods in use. 
Fences supplied in two weights — medium and extra heavy. 
All Fences painted WHITE— Our Brand 

THE PAGE WIRE FENCE CO., Limited, WALKERVILLE, Ont. 

Branches— Montreal, Toronto, St. John. 102 

"PAGE FENCES WEAR BEST" 
to 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



January 6, 1906 



Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 

50 and 5 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 20 p.c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. 33H p.c. 

C.F. pistol s p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Dominion Eley's and Kynoch s soft, 
12 gauge. 

black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 17 50 

soft, 10 gauge '9 5° 

chilled, 10 gauge 20 50 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 id 700 

Chilled 7 5° 

Powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton 475 

F.F.G., Dupont's 5 00 

Iron and Steel— Prices are quoted as 
follows : 

Bar iron (basis) 2 60 

Swedish iron (basis) 4 75 

Sleigh shoe steel 2 75 

Spring stee'. 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 So 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb 9 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Black Sheets— No change in price. We 

quote as before: 

Black sheets, ioto 16 gauge, 100 lb 3 50 

18 to 22 gauge 3 75 

24 gauge 3 9° 

26 gauge .... 4 00 

28 gauge 4 i° 

Galvanized Iron— The market is 
steady at the recent advance. We 
quote: 

Apollo, 16 gauge 3 9° 

18 and 20 gauge 4 10 

ua and 24 gauge 4 45 

26 gauge 4 4° 

a8gauge 4 6S 

30 gauge or 10 Ji oz 4 05 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 60 

26 gauge 4 65 

a8 " 4 9° 

Tin Plates— We now quote as follows: 

Tlnplate, IC charcoal, 30 x ao, Uu> .... 9 5° 

IX " 11 So 

XXt " .... 13 50 

Tenie Plates— Quoted at $9.00. 

Canada Plates— We quote: 

Canada plate, 18 x 21, ia * 24 3 50 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 3 75 

Canadapiate, full polished 425 

Sheet Zinc-The price is now $8.50 
for cask lots, and $9.00 for broken lots. 

Pig Lead— There has been another ad- 
vance of 25 cents and pig lead is 
ed to +5.0(1 per 100 lbs, 

Iron Pipe— Prices are still quoted as 
follows: 

Black iron pipe, % inch .... 

Y* " 2 5 

Black iron pipe. X inch 2 85 

% " 3 >5 

K " 400 

1 " 5 75 

iK " 785 

1% " 9 40 

" 2 " 12 90 

Petroleum and Gasoline— 1 'rices are 
quoted now as follows: 

Silver Star, per gal 21c. Vt 

Sunlight " 22'Ac 

Eocene '" 24V4C 

Pennoline " 25MC. 

Crystal Spray " 24VSC. 

Silver Light zz'Ac. 

Gasoline, 70-72 (Engine) 25c. 

(In barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg.) 

Paints, Oils and Turpentine- There is 
an average trade for the present sea- 
son. Prices are steady. We quote: 



White lead (pure) |6 50 

Bladder putty, in bbls o 02V4 

in kegs o 02K 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels 1 00 

Less than barrel lots 1 09 

Linseed oil, raw o 59 

Boiled o 62 

Window Glass— We quote: 
16-oz. O.G., single, in 50-ft. boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches {2.25 

26 to 40 a.40 

16-oz. O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases — 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to 40 4.25 

41 to 50 4.75 

5i to 60 5-25 

61 to 70 " 5.75 

21-oz.C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases — 

26 to 40 united inches 7.35 

41 to so 8.40 

51 to 60 9.45 

61 to 70 10. so 

71 to 80 n.55 

81 U85 12.60 

86 to 90 14-75 

16 to 95 17.30 

6 to 100 " 

New Brunswick Trade News 

St. John, N.B., Jan. 1, 1906. 
The Christmas rush is over. Hard- 
waremen in common with other mer- 
chants are settling down to a period of 
comparative quiet. But though the rush 
is over it is expected that the business 
to come will be stead}' and profitable. 
There can be no doubt now that the 
Christmas trade was excellent all 
around. For some dealers it was, of 
course, better than for others, but the 
fair-minded man who is satisfied with a 
reasonable, safe profit has no ground for 

complaint. 

* * 

The year 1905, all things considered, 
was one of good business for the hard- 
ware people. No failures of large con- 
cerns in the province were recorded and 
the smaller dealers were able, on the 
whole, to record a successful year. 
Plumbers did well, especially those who 
give their attention to contract work in 
installing lighting and heating plants. 
Several of them when interviewed by a 
local newspaper declared that installing 
such plants has been a feature of their 
year's work. They also gave it as their 
opinion that the farmers of the country 
are demanding more and more the bet- 
ter class of sanitary equipment in their 
buildings. This, of course, is of advan- 
tage to the plumber. The unusually firm 
tone in the metal market has been the 
most striking characteristic of the hard- 
ware business "during the latter part of 
the year. Apparently this firmness is 
still to be in evidence for a while to 
come. 

* * * 

The outlook for a good trade in skates, 
etc., is excellent. The Christmas time 
naturally saw many purchases in this 
line of goods, but the demand still keeps 
fairly brisk. A I t tic same time one can- 
not but feel on some occasions that a 
little more attention to the advertising 
of such goods might result in further 
profit for the dealers. 



The coming sitting of the Tariff Com- 
mission, in St. John is not exciting a 
very great deal of attention among the 
haidwaremen. Naturally they are inter- 
ested in the work of the Commission, 
but 1 lie interest is not exceptional. The 
hardware importers have decided to send 

30 



a deputation before the Commissioners. 
The members of the deputation are not 
expected to ask for changes in the tariff. 
The\ will, however, probably devote 
some attention to the dumping clause, 
the workings of which are not wholly 
appreciated. 



Mr. Fred T. Siddall, who recently dis- 
posed of. his business in Sackville to 
Mr. W. II. Carter, will probably leave 
ere long for the northwest. He has been 
in business as a tinsmith, plumber and 
stove dealer for several years and was 
doing nicely. 

Nova Scotia Trade News. 

Halifax, N.S., Jan. 3, 1906. 

The following is a review of the hard 
ware trade in Nova Scotia, for 1905 : 

The number of those competing for 
the hardware trade from this centre has 
been reduced during the past year, the 
firms of Black Bros. & Co., W. B. Ar- 
thur & Co., and Douglas & Prowse 
having gone out of the field; but that 
there is still considerable competition 
for the business to be done will be 
seen from the fact that there are still 
eight houses in the business. 

With these the year has been a good 
one, and the volume of trade has 
been larger. This is ascribed by some 
firms largely to the fact that the cus- 
tomers of the retiring firms were dis- 
tributed among the remaining houses; 
but apart from this altogether, a 
number of the largest firms appear to 
be of the opinion that a great deal of 
new business has come their way. 

The dullness in gold mining has 
affected that branch of supplies some- 
what, but the coal mines have been 
busy. Prices have maintained a pretty 
steady trend upwards, without any 
such reactions as have been noted in 
other branches of trade. For example 
turpentine is ten cents higher than 
last year. Pig iron two pounds per 
ton higher. Pig lead has advanced 
heavily, being about four pounds per 
ton above last year's figures. Ingot tin 
however has had the most extra- 
ordinary advance, being about thirty 
pounds a ton higher. This is due to the 
scarcity of the metal, and the fact that 
there is no efficient substitute for it. 
American copper is now three and one- 
half cents a pound higher. Spelter is 
three pounds a ton higher; linseed oil 
three pounds ten. Cotton is up nearly 
five cents a pound. All cotton goods 
are higher. Duck will cost about two 
cents per yard more; lines 2 cents a 
pound more. 

Collections have been fairly good all 
over the province. It is expected that 
high prices will curtail consumption to 
some extent this year, but it must be 
said that the trade here is usually far 
from quick to take advantage of rising 
markets, and the buyer in the Maritime 
Provinces probably gets the benefit of 
the markets more often than the seller. 
The lobstering and general fishing sea- 
sons have been pretty satisfactory; as 
although the catch was not heavy 
prices more than made up for this. The 
prosperity of the fishermen usually con 
tributes to the prosperity of the hard- 
ware dealers. The general outlook for 
the year is one of optimism; 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDRY AND METAL 
INDUSTRIES 



The International Coal & Coke Co. 
are to install 100 new coke ovens. The 
increase in the daily production will be 
from 800 to 1,000 tons of coke. 

During: the twenty-one months the 
Dominion Iron & Steel Co.'s blast fur- 
nace No. 4 has been in operation, 143,- 
850 tons of pig 1 iron, or an average of 
7,000 tons per month, has been pro- 
duced. On the production of this one 
furnace the Government has paid the 
bounty, amounting to $223,000. 

New coal fields at Beaver Lake, near 
Edmonton, are reported to be of a very 
high grade of bituminous coal. 

According- to the report of the On- 
tario Bureau of Mines, the total miner- 
al output in Ontario during 1905 am- 
ounted to $11,572,647. The report is 
in three parts, and can be obtained on 
application to the department. 

There are now eighteen shipping mines 
producing zinc in British Columbia, the 
total production during 1905 amounting 
in value to $273,000. The operation of 
the smelting plant at Frank will give 
the industry a boom during 1906. 
"A copper smelting plant is to be 
established at Wentworth Centre, N.S., 
at a cost of $300,000, according to a 
telegraphic report. There are several 
copper properties in Nova Scotia, and 
the establishment of the smelter should 
result in an increased production. 

Two diamond drills are to be used in 
developing the large coal areas near 
Nicola Lake. The Nicola Coal & Coke 
Co. own over 5 square miles of coal 
lands, and are directly on the proposed 
line of railway being built from 
Spence's Bridge to Nicola Lake. 

The Britannia Copper Syndicate, 
owning large properties near Vancouver, 
B.C., is to be merged into a new $5,- 
000,000 company, which will also 
absorb several other copper mining pro- 
perties and smelters on the British 
Columbia coast. 

The Niagara Falls Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co. has work enough ahead to 
keep it busy casting every day until 
April 1. The orders include the big 
pipe for the Ontario Power Co.'s eleva- 
tor incline, between transforming sta- 
tion and power house. 

One of the largest mining deals re- 
ported in Ontario for some time has 
just taken place by the transfer of a 
copper property some 80 miles west of 
Port Arthur. The mine is known as 
the Tip Top Copner Mine, and is owned 
bv Col. Rav of Port Arthur and Folger 
Bros., of Kingston. It .is understood 
that thev have sold the dump alone for 
$38,000, and that an option has been 
given on the mine to an American syn- 
dicate for $150,000. The mine is close 
to Kashaboiue, on the Canadian North- 
ern Railway. Outside of the Bruce 
Mines locality, on the north shore of 
Lake Huron, it is the best known cop- 
per property in the province. Interest 
in copper mining has revived a great 
deal recently on account of the sharp 
advance in the price of the metal. 



MACHINERY 

STEEL 

IRON FINISH 

SINGLE OR DOUBLE REELED 

COLD ROLLED 

Large assortment in stock. 

Close Prices for Import. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



ieseronfo Iron Co 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ol 



Charcoal Pig Iroiv 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strengtV 
is r quired ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



ii 



93 



MIDLAND 

BRAND. 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Pries to Silos Agent* 

Orummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND. ONT. Limited 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6d. and Is. Canisters 

'WELLINGTON 1 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery. Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 

Flint Cloths and. Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, Lonflon, Eilaud 

Agent: 

JOHN FORMAN, • 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 
31 



LAFARGE ( s £ 8 ) CEMENT 

for setting, pointing and backing 
Limestone, Granite or Marble where 
freedom from discoloration is desired. 
Send for descriptive catalogue. 

Orain Pipes, Sewer Bricks, 

Fire Bricks, Building Bricks, 
Portland Cement, 

Road Pawing Bricks and Blocks 

F. HYDE & CO. 

KINO. QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 




Enterprising 
Hardwaremen 

handle our 

ANTI-FREEZING 

PUMPS. 



They know that the 
gale of a good Pump 
biings about the sale 
of many olher things 
from satisfied custom- 



Do you handle our 
PUMPS? 

Write for catalogue 
and prices. 



The R. McDougall Co., Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO. 



ENDORSED 

Miners think highly of 

B. K. Morton & Co.'s 
B. C. Brand 

Drill Steel 

because it is the steel that fills their wants. 
Would you like full particulars'' 
Write to 

D. W. CLARK, P.O. Box 521, Toronto, Can. 
Canadian Representative. 

E. C. PRIOR & CO., Victoria, B.C., 

BAINES & PECKOVER, Toronto, Can. 

Agents 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u« n .d 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S 



Manufacturers of- 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIBMEHS -MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



INVESTIGATION INTO TACK "COMBINE." 



The examination into the affairs ol the 
Canada Tack Manufacturers' Association 
w.t^ resumed on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day \li. Curry continued his perusal of 
the minutes of tne association, Samuel 
Frame, one ol Jenkins & Hardy's clerks, 
being in the witness box. As stated in 
our hist issue the association was or- 
ganized in 1 s ; 1 2 in Montreal, the parties 
to the association agreement being the 
Montreal Rolling Mills Company, the 
I'lllow-Hersey Manufacturing Compan] . 
the Peck-Benny Company and the On- 
tario Tack Company of Hamilton. Wm. 
McMaster was elected president of the 
iation and T. II. Whit ton \ ice- 
president, R. and T. Jenkins, of Toron- 
to, being appointed secretary-treasurers. 
Subsequently under pressure .lames Pen- 
der & Co., the Portland Rolling Mills 
Company and W. 1). Woodhall joined the 
ation. Meetings ol the association 
to be held quarterly, alternately 
A Montreal and Toronto. 

Organization of the Association. 

The raison d'etre of the association 
was stated to he for the regulation of 
prices of tacks and various other ar- 
ticles of a similar nature, and schedules 
drawn up and distributed amongst 
the members of the association. All 
members agreed to he bound by any 
resolution adopted at the meetings and 
"not to sell the goods comprised in the 
agreement at prices below or on better 
conditions than those fixed in the 
schedules." Monthly statements were 
to be furnished by each member giving 
names of those to whom they had sold 
and also the amount of these sales. Mr. 
Jenkins was to be at liberty to exam- 
ine the books of any member at any 
time. The penally for violation of the 
agreement in this particular was to be 
J306-. It was shown that jobbers who 
signed the agreement as to the retail 
selling price of the various goods were 
entitled to what was termed a "loyal- 
ty" discount and they were entitled to 
a further "quantity" discount on buying 
in larger quantities. 

Mr. Curry sought to show that these 
firms were also in business for other 
articles and that they conducted their 
business in these lines on a similar- 
basis. Shot, horseshoes, cord wire, 
bobbs, rivets, burrs, saws and wire 
nails were mentioned as articles which 
came within the scope of the operations 
of the association. Mr. Tillev counsel 
for defendants, strongly objected to 
these other associations being intro- 
duced into the case. Mr. Curry persist- 
ed that they were all run on the same 
general lines, bul this Mr. Frame de- 
nied. Magistrate Denison held that the 
introduction of the screw and other as- 
ations into the case was in order. 

Mr. Curry questioned the witness with 
reference to the various resolutions pass-" 
("I from lime to time at the meetings 
of the association dealing with the regu- 
lation of prices and also with alleged 
violations of the rules of the associa- 
tion. For example, a letter was writ- 
ten to J. R. Foster & Son informing 
them that they must pay $100 as de- 
posil into the funds of the association 
or (dse the Maritime Provinces would 
tie declared an open market. Questioned 
as to whether the above firm was still 
in business Mr. Frame said he did not 
know. It appeared 1 hat a.1 one time the 
Pillow-Hersey Company's nut business 
had been bought by the Montreal Roll- 



llills ( '" , but Frame stated that 
they were still recognized m the books 
of the association as separate compan- 
ies. 

Equalising Freight Rates. 

At a meeting held in the Windsor Ho- 
tel Montreal,' April 7, 1803, the ques- 
tion of equalization was discussed. Mr. 
Curry questioned Mr. Frame as to the 
meaning of equalization. Witness stated 
that outside purchasers from various 
points called FOB. points received a 
rebate on their account amounting to 
the difference in freight between the 
nearest F.O.H. point and the point from 
which they ordered. Montreal, Toronto, 
Hamilton and London were F.O.B. 
points, but outside purchasers ordering 
from London did not receive the equal- 
ization rebate as there was no factory 
there. Purchasers at F.O.B. points got 
goods F.O.B. at their own point irre- 
spective of the point from which they 
ordered them. 

Mr. Frame slated that he had been 
for about five years in charge of the 
papers and books of the association at 
Jenkins & Hardy's offices. Questioned as 
to the meaning of the word "legisla- 
tion" as it occurred in the minutes, he 
stated that when a matter was describ- 
ed as needing legislation it meant that 
the "consent of the association" was 
required. 

During 1893 an agreement was made 
not to increase the number of tack ma- 
chines in operation. It would seem that 
this step would tend to restrict output 
and that in combination with the pool- 
ing arrangements of the company dis- 
closed later, it was unnecessary if not 
impossible for individual members to 
fieht for business beyond a certain 
amount. 

Breaches of Agreement. 

Several instances were triven in which 
breaches of the agreement in regard to 
the selling price of tacks had come be- 
fore the association at their meetings. 
Resolutions were passed absolving the 
offending members from the penalty they 
had incurred by such action. In some 
cases it was considered advisable to al- 
low members of the association to sell 
locally at a lower figure than that fixed 
by the association in order to meet com- 
petition in their district Cases were 
instanced in which firms had apparently 
obtained special treatment at the hands 
of the association, but no reasons for 
such treatment were given in the min- 
utes. The offer of Pender & Co., St. 
John, to sell several tack machines to 
the association for S2.000 was declined 
and the firm mentioned were ordered to 
pay $50 into the funds of the associa- 
tion and remain three months before 
their resignation was accepted. These 
machines were subsequently sold to H. 
Packard & Co. 

There were originallv fourteen firms 
on the lists of the association, four of 
whom were struck out. another being 
subsequently added. Magistrate Denison 
inquired the reason for their removal 
and Mr. Tillcy said the correspondence 
would show. 

In 1895 it was resolved to cancel the 
clause in the agreement giving 5 net 
cent, discount to purchasers of $125 
worth of tacks on the' ground tint (inns 
who boucht such a small ouantit-- were 
not entitled to be classed as doners. 
This eave offence to the Portland Roll- 
ing Mills Co., of St. John, who ulti- 

31 



mately sent in their resignation. The 
question was then reconsidered and the 
discount readjusted to the satisfaction 
of the Portland Rolling Mills, who then 
withdrew their resignation. 

In connection with the fact that mem- 
bers had continually been excused for 
violation of the agreement, Mr. Curry 
stated that the reason was that several 
members of the association about that 
time had sent in their resignations. 

Mr. Tilley objected to this statement, 
saying the resignations were not filed 
until some time after, but Mr. Curry in- 
sisted that they had been filed previous- 
ly, giving as an example the case of the 
\loii tteal Rolling Mills asking permis- 
sion to lower prices in a certain district 
to meet United States competition. Per- 
mission was refused by the association. 
The Montreal Rolling Mills accordingly 
tiled their resignation, upon which the 
required permission was granted. 

Mr. Tilley said that this particular 
case had nothing to do with the resigna- 
tions mentioned before, but had been in- 
troduced by Mr. Curry for his own pur- 
poses at this juncture. 

Prices Increased in 1895. 

In June, 1895, it was resolved to gen- 
erally increase prices, but it was agreed 
that members could sell at the old 
price to the extent of $600. In case 
they exceeded that amount, which they 
were allowed to do to the extent of 
$200, they were to pay into tne asso- 
ciation 20 per cent, of the excess. Mr. 
Curry inquired as to the destination of 
the 20 per cent., but Mr. Frame said he 
did not know. 

Mr. Curry raised the question of the 
system which was alleged to be in vogue 
in the association of pooling sales and 
profits, and examined Ledger "A" of 
the association, but was unable at this 
point to discover anything in reference 
to the pool. Mr. Curry asked where the 
pool accounts were kept, but Mr. Frame 
said he could not say that there was a 
pool at that time. Mr. Currv contended 
that the minutes showed that there was 
and Mr. Tilley said he did not remember 
any being mentioned. Mr. Currv prom- 
ised to produce letters establishing his 
contention that there was a pool and 
stated that the expression used in them 
was, "Please take notice that you owe 
pool so much," etc. 

The Arranging of Prices. 

A discussion took place between the 
magistrate and Mr. Tilley as to the ex- 
tent to which business men were entitled 
to arrange prices. Mr. Tilley held that 
men were at liberty to agree together 
to sell at a fixed price and that the per- 
son violating such an agreement anil 
selling at a lower price should be sub- 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^ 

Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ject to a fine or prosecution on the part 
of other parties to the agreement. His 
Worship said that this was just the 
very thing at which be helieved the 
statute was aimed, as any attempt to 
keep prices above what, the goods could 
actually be sold at was a restriction of 
trade. 

"For thirteen years," said Mr. Tilley, 
"the association has been in existence, 
but you have not yet come to anything 
very vicious." He submitted thai the 
giving of a 5 per cent, discount to those 
people who exclusively bought from them 
was not a restriction of trade, only 
that the buyer is not at liberty to deal 
with anyone who is not a member of 
the association. 

Mr. Curry : "If they don't buy from 
you they don't get the discount." 

Mr. Tilley : "There are other manu- 
facturers of tacks. Why don't they buy 
from them?" 

Col. Denison : "What are the other 
tack concerns ?" 

Mr. Tilley : "Ask Mr. Frame." 

Mr. Frame stated that there was a 
firm of the name of Wynn in Hamil- 
ton and also the Bazin Manufacturing 
Company of Quebec. 

Mr. Curry stated that these two firms 
had been for some considerable time 
worried to join the association. 

Mr. Tilley : "Vice-President Whitton 
says that they did not keep at them." 

A record was produced which charged 
all the members with $40 or 20 per- 
cent, on the excess of $200 over the 
$600 mentioned earlier in the case. 

Piices Lowered in 1896. 

In January, 1896, it was resolved at 
a meeting of the association that all 
prices be lowered forthwith. The Port- 
land Rolling Mills Co. stated that pre- 
vious to the above meeting, their travel- 
ers had sold tacks subject to the lower 
rates which only came into force at 
that meeting. These prices were con- 
firmed, but Mr. Curry stated that those 
firms to whom the goods had been sold 
at these prices previous to January, 
1896, were not entitled to the usual ex- 
tra rebate. Mr. Tilley objected to this 
statement and stated that Mr. Curry 
probably had his own reasons for mak- 
ing it. It was then shown that in some 
cases buyers had had their invoices dis- 
counted of the face and when they af- 
terwards applied for the quantity dis- 
count were informed that they were not 
entitled to it. 

In 1897 the resignation of Pender & 
Co. was riled and Mr. Curry accordingly 
suggested that they were apparently not 
out of the combine in 1895 as had been 
stated. He further said that he believed 
they were now members. Mr. Tilley 
stated that they were not. 

Fines Given to Charity. 

In April, 1898, it was resolved that 
should a member be reported to the 
secretary to have violated the agree- 
ment, the secretary was to investigate 
the charge and if not convinced that the 
charge was untrue was to call for an 
allidavit on the part of the member to 
be made before him or a notary that 
the charges were false and incorrect. If 
t he member charged with violation could 
not give a satisfactory account of him- 
self the agreement was to be considered 
violated and he was to be penalized to 
the extent of $300 to be handed to some 
charitable institution. 

The following are some articles which 




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When you handle S. W. P., Prepared, every line of goods you carry 
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In the approaching spring paint campaign Sherwin-Williams 
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®The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

Warehouses: 86 York Street, Toronto; 147 Bannatyne Street, East, Winnipeg. 
Canadian Headquarters and Plant: 639 Centre Street, Montreal, Quebec. 



were placed outside the operations of 
the association at this time and made 
open : Brass shoe nails, copper shoe 
nails, gimp nails, hob-nails with plain 
heads, shank nails with diamond heads. 
At a meeting of the members in 1898 
the question was discussed of doing 
business on a pool basis or by amalga- 
mation of factories. In January, 1899, 
it was decided that the business of the 
association be conducted on a pool basis. 
The pool tax was fixed at 15 per cent., 
viz., that 15 per cent, of the total sales 
was to be paid into the pool by each 
member, and this was to be divided ac- 
cording to the proportion in which he 
manufactured. W. D. Woodhall com- 
plained about this time as to the divi- 
sion of the pool. Mr. Hardy replied that 
his company's percentage was 4^ per 
cent., but they were not making it. At 
the end of the year the proportion of 
each member was adjusted according to 
the ratio in which his sales stood to 
the total of the combined sales. 

How Production was Arranged, 

It apptared that the original propor- 
tions to which the members were en- 
titled were never changed to any great 
extent. In January, 1898, the following 
were the percentages taken by the sev- 
eral parties to the agreement : Mont- 

33 



real Rolling Mills, 35.67 ; Pillow-Hersey 
Manufacturing Company, 25 ; Peck-Benny 
Company, 11.65 ; Portland Rolling 
Mills, 4.73 ; Ontario Tack Company, 16; 
W. D. Woodhall & Company, 6.95. ' 

Shortly after this the Portland Roll- 
ing Mills severed their connection with 
the association and in 1901 the percent- 
ages were as follows : Montreal Rolling 
Mills, 35 ; Pillow-Hersey Manufacturing 
Company, 27 ; Peck-Benny Company, 
13 ; Ontario Tack Company, 17 ; W. 1). 
Woodhall & Company, 8. 

It was stated the Montreal Rolling 
Mills usually got more than they earned. 
Woodhall only got exactly what" he earn- 
ed. From this Mr. Curry concluded that 
there could be no competition as be- 
tween members of the association, and 
Mr. Tilley agreed that there was no 
competition in price. 

Mr. Curry insisted that there could be 
no competition and Magistrate Denison 
also held that competition was impossi- 
ble as if one got ahead of the others in 
the sales the others would get their 
share of it. 

On Wednesday afternoon an adjourn- 
ment was made until Friday afternoon. 



The value of business to a dealer is— 
not the profit on the first sale but how 
many customers it holds for him. 



HARDWARE AND MBTAL 



January 6, 1906 



CATALOGUES. BOOKLETS, ETC. 

When Madias catalogues, for review, manufacturers 

would confer a favor by pointing out the new articles 
that they contain. It would .is-iM the editor in writing 
the review. 

Hobbs Haidware Job Sheet. 
The Htobbs Hardware Company, Lon- 
don, .ui> calling the attention of the 

trade to their job sheet just issued. 
statins; that some of the lines are much 
below manufacturers' present prices be- 
cause of recent changes in market quo- 
tations. Their reason for cleaning out 
about 175,000 worth of stock, consisting 
of odd ends of certain lines, and other 
lines they intend dropping, is that they 
are nou working on a new catalogue 
and before issuing it desire to have their 
stock thoroughly overhauled. 

Wheelbarrpws. 
The Wilkinson Plow Company, To 
ronto, have issued an attractive eat a 
logae illustrating their many lines of 
manufacture, including such hardware 
lines as wagons, manure spreaders, 
snow plows, hog troughs, stable fit- 
ting's, and wheelbarrows. This latter 
line is of particular interest to the 
trade, and several pages are devoted to 
the various types of trucks and wheel 
harrows made. Steel wheels and No. 1 
[umber only are used in the garden. 
stable, and other barrows shown on 
page 70. Clay, cordwood, stone, green 
brick, sawmill and dock, contractor's, 
tempering and steel tray barrows are 
also shown. Send for a copy of the 
catalogue and mention Hardware and 
Metal. 

James Smart Co's Calendars. 
Two calendars issued bv the James 
Smart Mfg. Co.. Brockville, manufac- 
turers of the Kelsey warm air genera 
tor. etc.. should be in demand amongst 
the trade. They arc entitled "Reading 
the Future," and "Tom and Jerry." 
Mention Hardware and Metal if you 
send for a copy. 

A Pretty Scene. 
One of the most beautiful pictures on 
any of the calendars seen by Hardware 
and Metal this season is a countrv road 
scene shown on a tastv calendar issued 
by A. Vance Cline. plumber and dealer 
in heating goods. Grimsby. 

A Holiday Circular. 
The Borden Co.. Warren. Ohio, whose 
Canadian reoresentative is M. E. 
Murray, lb' Sheopard street, Toronto, 
sent out a striking holiday circular 
drawing attention to their new stvle 
"Solid Adjustable" die stock. For 
particulars regarding this machine 
write the above address and mention 
Hardware and Metal. 

Supply Exhausted. 
In the announcement last week of the 
calendar supplied hv the James Pot. 
ertson Co.. it was stated that copies 
had been sent out to customers. Al- 
though we did not announce that conies 
could be nrociired on leanest, there has 
been a steady stream of requests for 
the dramatic calendar. We are renuesl 
ed to announce that the sunnlv is ex- 
hausted the demand being 30 great 
that a large number will have to be 
disappointed. 



Either Way You Look At It 

From the standpoint of either safety or accuracy, no better weapon for defence 

litmniyiii urn minniiim minimi I& or attack can be had 



than the Iver Johnson 

Revolver. No safety mechanism could be 

mote simple and perfect — a device that means, safely, 

without any "ifs" or "buts" about it. The 

Iver Johnson 

REVOLVERS 



need not be handled carefully; 
with chambers fully Ina-lfl, 
drop it on the floor, hammer 
the hammer— it can't possibly 
go off unless you deliberately 
pull the trigger. 
Iver Johnson Revolvers are for 

sale at all dealers. 
Hammer, $6.50 Hammerless, S7.80 
Write for our bright little 
booklet, "Shots" and complete 
catalogue, free, 

Jver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works^ 

F1TCHBURG. MASS 



Samuel, Benjamin Co.'s Calendar. 

M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co., 
wholesale metal merchants, Toronto, 
have issued a very attractive calendar 
for 1906. Any leader of Hardware and 
Metal who lias not received the calen- 
dar can obtain one by sending a post- 
paid to the firm, mentioning this paper. 

Thermometer and Calendar. 

A combined thermometer and calendar 
is a useful novelty being supplied to the 
trade by the London Rolling Mill Co. 
A paper calendar is attached to a tin 
sheet on which a substantial thermome- 
ter is mounted. On the tin, also, the 
company announces its various manu- 
factures. Readers who send for one of 
these seasonable novelties will kindly 
mention this paper. 

Purvis Bros.' Calendar. 

An attractive calendar has been issued 
by Purvis Bros., Sudbury, who do a 
jobbing as well as a retail business in 
shelf and heavy hardware. Any of their 
customers who have not received a copy 
should write for one, mentioning Hard- 
ware and Metal. 

A Desk Calendar. 
Customers of the 1). Moore Company, 
Hamilton, have received a novel little 
desk calendar of about 3£x5 inches. On 
its face is an illustration of the exten- 
sive planl of the company. Customers 
who have not received a copy should 
mention Hardware and Metal when send- 
ing for one. 

34 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 
Ontario. 

Hugh Shaw, blacksmith, Hamilton, de- 
ceased. 

M. Mclntyre, blacksmith, Alvinston, is 
advertising business for sale. 

B. T. Carruthers, blacksmith, Wode- 
house, advertising his business for sale. 

John Bishop, of John Bishop & Co., 
hardware merchants, Brantford, de- 
ceased. 

There was a meeting of the creditors 
of Thos. P. Hog an, hardware merchant, 
Westport, on the 28th ult. 

Quebec. 

The premises of J. N. Blair, stove 
merchant, Montreal, are closed. 

The assets of Galarneau & Ethier, 
plumbers, Montreal, have been sold. 

Western Canada. 

Mooney & Rowson, agricultural imple- 
ments, Cartwright, Man., have dis- 
solved. 

W. G. Wilson, agricultural implements, 
Starbuck, Man., has assigned to C. H. 
Newton. 

Kylie Bros. & Curtis, hardware, etc., 
Craik, Alta., will be succeeded by Kylie, 
Curtis cV Blanchard. 

Mill & Forrest, agricultural imple- 
ments, Manitou, Man., have been suc- 
ceeded by M. E. Crane. 

Coulson & Crawford, agricultural im- 
plements, Strathcona, Alta., have been 
succeeded by Crawford & Fawcett. 

Nova Scotia. 
Angus Met. cod, hardware merchant, 
Sydney, is compromising at in pet cent. 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



Only 
Wholesali 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 



F"OOD OMOI 



RS 




-3 NED 




No. 


1 

2 

3 

31 



" Universal " Meat Choppers 
Chops Weight 



V/v lbs. per minute 

2 

2% " 

3% •• 

4 



3 lbs. 

4 " 

5 " 

S " 



Small Family. 

Medium " 
Large " 

Butcher's 



No. 

25 

30 



"Ideal" Meat Choppers 

Chops 

2 lbs. per minute Small Family 

3 " " Large 



Chop all kinds of raw or cooked meats, vegetables and fruit, fine or coarse, into clean uniform pieces without mashing them. 



RETURNED 




Straw Cutters 

One, two and three cutters— adjustable wood frame. 



RETURNED 



Jk 




\ 1 

German and Enterprise Meat Ohoppers 







No. 
6 
10 
12 
22 
32 



Chops 
\y A lbs. per minute 

3 

3 
4 

4 



Weight 
1% lbs. 
8 
7 

12 

18 



Small Family 
Large " 

Butcher's Size 



Criswold Meat Choppers 
No. Chops Weight Cutter 

\% lbs. per minute 4 lbs. 4 Tinned 

1 2 " 4% " 4 

2 -2% " " 5"4 

3 3"" 9 " 4 

Chops all kinds of meats, vegetables and fruit— 4 cutters— coarse. fin« and 
extra fine. With Patent Drop Spout. 



FOR OTHER CUTTERS SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



We Ship Promptly. 



I 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory : Dufferin 8treet, Toronto. 
35 



Our Prices Are Right 



£ 



Hardware and Metal 



January 6, 1906 




ADVANCES IN MIXED PAINT. 

Speaking of conditions in the I aited 
States, the Taint. Oil ;u\d Drug Re 
porter says manufacturers of mixed 
paints have had a serious problem to 
solve in the increasing cost of their 
product during the pas! two or three 
years. They have finally been forced to 
the conclusion that one of two courses 
must be adopted — either their paint 
must be cheapened or the price must be 
advanced. This dilemma was apparent 
two years aL. r ". but it was then hoped 
that the high prices of material and 
labor were only temporary and that a 
inn would set in that would re- 
store manufacturing cots to their 
former level. But that hope has not 
been realized. On the contrary, prices 
of all raw materials have been further 
advanced, until the problem of doing 
business at a profit has become acute. 
and leading- paint manufacturers have 
reluctantly concluded that an advanc° 
in prices of mixed paints is the only 
wax out of the difficulty. A dozen or 
more paint manufacturers have advanc- 
ed their prices 5 to 10, cents per gallon. 
That advance does not cover the in- 
creased cost of manufacture, but it 
places a portion of the added burden on 
the shoulders of the consumer, where it 
eventually must fall in any case. 

The position of the manufacturer in a 
time when prices are advancing is not 
pleasant. Take the single item of tur- 
pentine, for example. It is said that 
one leading varnish manufacturer of 
this country uses 1.200 barrels of tur- 
pentine monthlv— upwards of 14.000 bar- 
rels a vear. As compared with last 
year, turpentine is now selling at 10c 
per gallon higher, so that the increased 
cost to the manufacturer over last year, 
on the single item of turpentine alone, 
is $6,000 a month, or $72,000 a year. 
Tn the case of the paint manufacturer 
the showing is still worse, as the cost 
of turpentine is now fully 20 cents 
greater than it was when the present 
nriee of mixed paints was fixed, some 
five years ago. That means that a 
large manufacturer of uiixed paints, 
using 3.000 to 5.000 barrels of turpen 
tine annually, is now paving for that 
one item $30,000 to $50,000 annually in 
excess of its cost five years ago. On a 
consumption of 5.000 tons of lead annu 
ally he is paying $50,000 to $100,000 
more than formerlv. On 3,000 tons of 
zinc he pavs $30,000 more annually. 

Tn short, on nearlv every item of 
cost except linseed oil he is paying 
more now that one. two or five years 
ago, and linseed oil is at practically 
the same figure as last year. Tt is not 
a question of increased cost of anv one 
material— nearlj evervthiDg that enters 
into the coe1 of paint has advanced. 
Labor, pigments, cans, kits and pack- 
ing boxes, insurance and expenses of all 
kinds, are higher now than ever before 
in the history of the trade, and thi 
suit is that, without any definite con- 
d action, the paint manufacturers 



generally have slightly advanced their 

prices, on the principle that an article 
must I'.' sold for lien!- than it costs to 
produce if the manufacturer would re- 
main in business; and that to maintain 
the quality of his product even at the 
risk of advancing its price is the only 
course open to a paint manufacturer 
who is jealous of his reputation. 



WHITE LEAD AND WHITE ZINC 
PROSPECTS. 

The continued high prices of blue lead 
and spelter have caused prospective pur- 
chasers of products of these metals to 
view with some apprehension the idea 
of having to make contracts on the pre- 
sent basis. So far as white lead is con- 
cerned, there is reason to believe that 
values will not decline in the near fu- 
ture, and should linseed oil take an up- 
ward tendency it is by no means im- 
probable that ground white lead will 
rise in price in unison. With regard to 
zinc paints, there is some difficulty in 
forecasting even with approximate ac- 
curacy. It must be borne in mind that 
commercially there are three sources of 



zinc white. (1) Spelter, whence all the 
firsl rate continental brands of oxide 
of zinc are derived ; (2) native zinc 
ore, the .source of the American oxide 
which is now imported so largely into 
Britain ; (3) that, group of substances 
(including blende, galvanizers' waste, 
coal, sulphate of soda, sulphuric acid, 
etc.), required to produce sulphide zinc 
white, a material which is' now manu- 
factured in Britain in important quan- 
tities. It seems somewhat strange that 
economic conditions so varied as those 
represented by these three classes 
should have combined to raise them all 
in price. It is alleged (somewhat loose- 
ly, perhaps) that they all rise in unison 
with spelter, but as a matler of fact, 
except in connection with the continent- 
al oxide, spelter has really little to do 
with the case. Whence certain observers 
opine that zinc products have an inflated 
value at present, and that a reaction 
may set in any day. — English Painters' 
Review. 

Do you use your windows to the best 
advantage ? There is no better way of 
keeping goods constantly before the 
public than by neat and attractive win- 
dow displays. 




I 



We Wish You a Prosperous New Year 



but let us remind you that in 
your Paint and Varnish De- 
partment you can at least 
insure prosperity by stocking 
the Imperial Lines for 1906. 
Our new Catalogue will be 
mailed in a few days. If you 
do not receive a copy, drop us 
a card. 



The Imperial Varnish & Color Company 



Limited 



TORONTO, Ontario, Canada 



V^^^^i^^^^^^-^%.«*'%^^%^'%/%/%^/%/%^^^.^/%.^%*»»^^^^'^^^»^^%'%^^'\* 



36 



January 6, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metai 



Just What You Can Se// 

You will find that the trade like the 

STRIPING COLORS 

that we make because we grind them in specially prepared Hard-Drying Oil. 

These STRIPING COLORS are manufactured to suit makers of agricultural implements, waggons, etc. 
Put up in one pound tins, five and ten pound press cans and ten and twenty-five pound pails. 

OF COURSE, YOU WANT A SUPPLY. 

THE STANDARD PAINT &VARNISH WORKS CO., Limited, Windsor, ont. 



Standard Lanterns 
for 1906 



Banner Cold Blast Lantern (See New Design) 
Leader Gold Blast Lantern, 
Climax Safety Tubular Lantern, " 

SAMPLES OF ABOVE READY 
FEBRUARY 1ST. 

For sale by all prominent jobbers of Hardware and 
Crockery. 

The "Banner" and "Leader" 
Lanterns are both warranted Wind- 
proof, and as usual surpass all others 
for quality and construction. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

ONTARIO LANTERN AND LAMP CO., limited 

HAMILTON, ONT. 



B. A. GRAUTOFF & CO. 

8 Fenchurch Buildings, London, E.C. 
Import and Export. 

Old established house with highest connections in 

Great Britain and on the Continent of Europe. 
Cable Address, " Grautoff London," Liebers Code. 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sal* by al] Wholesale Dealer,. 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Manufacturers 

¥¥ 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGH-GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 



are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 



To be obtained from the 
principal Hardware 
Dealers and Glass 



Merchants. 



Ag.nt. tor Canada: A Ramsay & Son Company, Montreal 



OILS 

Canadian Agents 
J. A. BERNARD, 

21 8t. Peter street., Quebec 
HOMER TAYLOR, 
Temple Bldg., Montreal 



Raw Linseed 
Boiled Linseed 
Pale Boiled Linseed 
Pale Refined Linseed 

FRED'K FENNER & CO., LTD. 

PENINSULAR HOUSE, MONUMENT ST., E.C. 

LONDON, ENGLAND. 



'DOMINION'' 
BRAND 

OILS GUARANTEED GENUINE. 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK foy "™""" *<»">" "c» T q- w,» 




WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL OO,, Limited, 



■ LONDON, ONT, 



HAVE YOU A CLERK 

that is showing special interest in the progress of your business? Don't you 
think it would be a good idea to present him with a copy of 

HARDWARE and METAL 

this year? It would make him still more valuable. Don't you think so ? Extra 
subscriptions only cost $1.50 a year. 



37 



Hardware and Metal 



January 6, 1906 




Paint economy, like economy in 
other lines, depends upon getting 
good value for your money. 

Anchor and 
English Liquid 
Paints 

we know to be the best value 
obtainable in paint. 
They are perfect paints. There 
is nothing used in their manu- 
facture but the purest pigments, 
linseed oil, turpentine, dryer?, 
and the world's best white lead— 
BRANDRAM'S B. B. GENU- 
INE 




Manufactured by 



HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited 

HALIFAX and ST. JOHN 

HENDERSON & POTTS CO., 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 




QUEBEC. 

( itli, . ol II u:i>" l&l LND Han m 

232 MoGUl Street, 

Montreal, .Ian 6, 1906 

A seasonable quietness has character- 
ized the week's proceedings as trade has 
nol ye( settled down after the holiday 
rush. Many of the travelers for local 
manufacturers have not yet gone mil on 
their territory so that most of the orders 
now coming t<> hand are to complete lines 
which the annual stock-taking has shown 
to be short. 

No further change has taken place in 
the |nico of red lead, and all other 
lines are still quoted at the figures giv- 
en last week. 

Linseed Oil— No material change in 
conditions has occurred, and We are still 
quoting the following prices: Raw, 
one to four barrels, 47c; five to nine 
barrels, 46c; boiled, one to four barrels, 
50c ; five to nine barrels, 49c, f .o.b. 
Montreal, net 30 days. 

Turpentine — The market has steadied 
down since the recent decline and we are 
still authorized to quote the following 
I rices: Single barrel, 03c. per gallon. 
Two barrels or over, 92c For smaller 
quantities than barrel, 5c extra per 
gallon is charged. Standard gallon i s 
8.40 lbs. f.o.b. point of shipment. :iet 
30 days. 

Ground White Lead— Our quotations 
are as follows: Best brand Govern- 
ment standards, $5.75 to $5.80; No. 1, 
$5.40 to $5.55: No. 2, $5.05 to $5.30: 
No. 3, $4.80 to $5.05; all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— Prices are: Barrels, 
$5.40; 100 lb. packages, $5.65; 6 to TO 
lb. tins. $6.65. 

Dry White Zinc — No advances have 
yel been made, though these are likely to 
con e after existing stocks run out. 
We quote the following prices : 
Pure dry in casks, 7 l-2c : in 100 lb. 
kegs, 8c; No. 1 zinc in casks. 6 l-2c: 
in 100 lb. kegs, 7c. 

White Zinc (around in oil) —We quote: 
25-lb. irons, 8c to 10 l-2c ; No. 1, 6 3-4c ; 
No. 2. 5 3-4c 

Putty— Our quotations are: Pure lin- 
seed oil, $1.75 to $1.85; bulk in barre's, 
$1.50; in 25-lb. irons, $1.80; in tins, 
$1.90; bladdered putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral — We give the follow - 
nr. i rices: Casks, 7 l-4c; 100-lb. kqgs, 
7 l-2c; smaller quantities, 8 l-2e. 

Red Lead— Last week's advance has 
held good, but no further revision in 
pi ices has taken place. We quote as fid- 
lows: Genuine red lead in casks, $4.75 ; 
in !'0-ll>. kegs, $5.00; in less quantities 
at the rate of $5.75 per 100 lbs.; No. 1 
led had. casks, $4.50; keg>, $4.75: and 
sn aller quantities, $5.50. 

Gum Shellac — We still quote: Fine 
orange, 55c. per lb.; med. orange, 50c 

38 



per lb.; bleached shellac (white), 60c. 
per lb. 

Paris Green (for 1906)— We quote 
as follows: Barrels, 600 lbs., 15 l-4c. 
for Canadian Government standard, 
to 15 3-4c. for Berber's English; 
kegs, 250 lbs., 15 l-2c. to 16c; drums, 25 
lbs., 16 l-2c. to 17c; drums, 50 and 100 
lbs., 16c. to 16 l-2c; 1 lb. packets, 17c 
to 17 l-2c; 1 lb. tins, 18c. to IS l-2c; 
1-2 lb. packages, 19c to 20 l-2c. per 
pound. Terms, 2 per cent, off on Beig- 
er's English, 

Shellac Varnfsh— We quote as follows: 
$2.50 to $2.60; pure orange, $2.40 to 
$2.50: No. 1 orange, $2.35 to $2.45. 

Mixed Paints— We quote from $1.20 to 
$1.40 pei gallon, according to lots. 

Castor Oil— We are still quoting: 7 
l-2c. to 8 l-2c, according to lots. 

Refined Petroleum— We still quote: 
American water white, 16 l-2c. and 17 
l-2c; Canadian prime white, 14 l-2c 
and 15 l-2c; 18 l-2c. and 19 l-2c ex 
warehouse. 

Window Glass— Some consignments of 
glass are still coming in, many of them 
being shipments delayed from last Fall. 
Prices are stationary, and are quoted 
as follows: First break, 50 feel. 
$2.10; second break, $2.20; first break. 
100 feet, $4.25; third break, 100 feet. 
$4.75; fourth break, 100 feet, $5; fifth 
break, 100 feet, $5.25; sixth break, 100 
feet. $5.75; seventh break, 100 feet. 
$6.25: eie-hth break, 100 feet. $6.50. Dia- 
mond star, first break, 50 feet, $2.30; 
second break. 50 feet, $2.50; first break. 
100 feet, $4.40; second do., $4.80: third 
do., $5.75; fourth do., $6.50; fifth do.. 
$7.50; sixth do., $8, and seventh do., $9. 
Double thick, first break, 50 feet, $3.45; 
second break, $3.75; first break, 100 feet. 
$6.75 : second do., $7.25 ; third do., $8.75 ; 
fourth do., $10; fifth do., $11.50; sixth 
do., $12.50: seventh do., $14; eishth do., 
$16.50: ninth do., $18; tenth do.. $20; 
eleventh do.. $24.00, and twelfth do.. 
$28.50. 

ONTARIO. 

office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 6, 1906. 

Big jumps in lmseed oil and turpen- 
tine have been made this week, oil jump- 
ing up about 4 cents, and turpentine be- 
ing quoted 2c. higher than last week. 
Conditions in the English markets are 
such as to make it likely that even high- 
er prices will be experienced during the 
Winter, and Canadian crushers desire to 
move up prices much higher than those 
ruling now. 

While the 19C5 business was not the 
greatesl experienced iii the history of 
the trade, it was an exceedingly salis- 
factoiv year, and had linseed oil glass, 
and other lines maintained equally high 



January 6, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



prices throughout the year as they did 
in the bi.u years three or tour years ago, 
1905 would have been a record-breaking 
.year. 

'i he open weather is still encouraging 
considerable buying, and trade is very 
brisk for this season. 

White Lead— Ex Toronto, pure white, 
$5.80; No. 1, $5.37 1-2; No. 2, $5.00: 
No. 3, $4.25; No. 4, $4.50 in packages of 
'J5 lbs. and upwards; l-2e. per lb. extra 
will be charged for 12 1-2 lb. packages; 
genuine dry white lead, in casks, $5.40. 

Red Lead— Genuine in casks of 500 
lbs., $5.00, ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., 
$5.25; No. 1, in casks of 500 lbs., $4.75, 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $5.00. 

White Zinc- Genuine V.. M., in casks, 
$6.50: in 25 lbs., $7.50; in 12 1-2 lbs., 
$8.00; Lehigh, in casks, $5.50; in 25 lbs., 
$6.00; in 12 1-2 lbs., $6.50. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gal'on lots, 57 to 
90c. per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c. to $1.00 per 100 lbs. 

Whiting— 60c. to 65c. per 100 lbs.; 
Gilders' whiting, 75c. 

Paris Green (for 1906)— We quote 
as follows: Barrels, 600 lbs., 15 l-4c. 
for Canadian Government standard, 
to 15 3-4q. for Berger's English; 
kegs, 250 lbs., 15 12c. to 16e. ; drums, 25 
lbs., IB l-2c. to 17c; drums, 50 and 100 
lbs., 16e. to 16 l-2c. ; 1 lb. packets, 17c. 
to 17 l-2c; 1 lb. tins, 18c. to 18 l-2c. ; 
1-2 lb. packages, 19c. to 20 l-2c. per 
pound. Terms, 2 per cent, off on Berg- 
er's English. 

Shellac Vainish — Pure orange in 
barre's, $2.80; white, $2.90 per barrel; 
No. 1 (orange), $2.25. 

Linseed Oil— Our quotations are: Raw, 
1 to 4 barrels, 56c; boiled, 59c; 5 to 9 
barrels, raw, 55c. ; boiled, 58c. Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and Guelph, net 30 
days. Advance of 2c. for delivery to 
outside points. 

Turpentine— Single barrel lots, 97c. 
f.o.b., point of shipment, net 
thirty days. For less quantities 
than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra will be 
added, and for 5-gallon packages, 50c, 
and 10-gallon packages 80c will be 
charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bar- 
rels, 5 to 25c per lb.; cabinet glue, in 
barrels, 11 1-2 to 12c; emery glue, in 
barre's, 15c; bookbinders' ground, 11 
l-2c; finest American white, 19c; No. 1 
American white, 15c per lb. 

Putty — Ordinary, bladders in barrels, 
$1.65 to $1.75; pure linseed oil, $2.00 to 
$2.10; bulk in barrels, $1.50; pure, 
$1.95 to $2.00; 100-lb. kegs, 25c extra. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2.00 
per barrel. 

Liquid Paints -Pure, $1.20 to $1.35 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 70c to 80c. 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1.00. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 8 1-2 to 
9c. per lb., and 10c for single tins. 

Refined Petroleum— Trade continues 
normal. We quote: Canadian prime 
white, 14c; water white, 16c; American 
water white, 16c to 18c ex warehouse. 

Crude Petroleum— Prices continue un- 
changed. We quote: Canadian, $1.36; 
Pennsylvania, $1.61; Ohio, 94c. 



AMERICAN WHITE LEAD PROCESS. 

A practical system ot lead manufac- 
ture, which appears to be as yet undo- 
scribed in technical literature, is prac- 
tised in America. As is well known, 
the usual German method is to hang 
strips of lead over horizontal wooden 
roda in chambers into which a mixture 
of air, carbon dioxide and acetic acid 
vapour is blown. The lead is then 
slowly converted into white lead, which 
falls on the floor of the chamber as it 
forms and is collected for sale. The 
American process is said to be much 
more rapid. The lead is fused in cast- 
iron pans, and flows from them through 
pipes into a brick chamber, where it is 
very finely divided by a steam blast 
which meets the issuing steam of mol- 
ten lead at an angle of 45 deg. The re- 
sult is that the cooled iead is deposited 
in the chamber in the form of solid 
grains like sand. These are sifted, and 
the coarser ones are returned to the 
melting pots. The portion passing the 
sieve is put in lots of from It to 2 tons 
in rotating wooden drums, together 
with dilute acetic acid. About 1 cwt. 
of acetic acid of bO per cent, strength 
is diluted with its own weight of water, 
and of the whole one-third is put into 
the drum on the first day, another on 
the third, and the remainder on the 
fifty day. After a week's continual ro- 
tation, during which air, carbonic acid, 
steam, and occasionally water if the 
steam is too dry, are being continually 
blown through the trunnions on which 
the drums rotate, the process is com- 
plete. Care must be taken to regulate 
the amount of moisture present. If 
there is too much, extra expense is in- 
curred in drying, and if there is too 
little the conversion into white lead 
will take more than a week. Samples 
taken at intervals from the contents of 
the drums should, after the first two or 
three days, be of a moderately thin 
pasty nature. The escaping gases go to 
the chimney shaft, and any unconverted 
lead forms into a lump, which after the 
white lead paste has been removed at 
the end of the week is sent back to the 
melting pots. The carbonic acid is sup- 
plied to the drum in the form of fur- 
nace combustion gases, previously filter 
ed to free them from dus£. The paste 
is ground up in a mill, and the white 
lead is separated into various degrees 
of fineness by levigation. It is then 
either dried or ground up with oil ready 
for the market. — English Decorators 
Review. 



WORLD'S PETROLEUM PRODUC- 
TION. 

The United States supplied more than 
one-half of the petroleum produced in 
the world in 1904. A statement of the 
world's production of petroleum, pre 
pared by the British Board of Trade 
puts the petroleum production of the 
world in 1904 at 9,303,000,000 gallons, 
of which 4,91(1,000,000 gallons were pro- 
duced in the United States and 3,650,- 
000,000 gallons in Russia. 

The output from Canada was 20,000,- 
000 gallons. The total production in 
1903 was s,">0 1,000,000 gallons. The 
United States and Russia produce prac- 
tically nine tenths of the petroleum of 
the world. 

39 




Tune— "ROW! BROTHERS, ROW!" 
i Apologies to Moore) 

"Quickly, when comes the growing 
time, 

"The potato plants flourish and 
potato bugs climb. 

"Soon as the blossoms have fallen 
down, 

"The codling moth gets moving 
aroun'. 

"Spray ! brothers, Spray ! the bugs 
grow fast, 

"And the fungi strikes like a bane- 
ful blast, 

"Spray! brothers, Spray! the har- 
vest comes on 

"When sound fruit and potatoes 
reward work well done." 



Canada 

Paint 

Company's 



PARIS 
GREEN 



Kills 



POTATO 
RUGS 



MADE ONLY BY THE 

Canada Paint Company 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



Hardware and Metal 



January 6, 1906 



Stoves and Tinware 



STOVE TRADE DURING 1905. 

I', ov . jiven a Dumber of Letters 
from stove manufacturers reviewing the 
past year's business and touching upon 
the possibility of higher prices during 
i he coming year. As stated a week ago, 
the 1905 Fall trade was not as good =>* 
expected, owing to the open weather 
during November and December, and 
the heavy importation of American 
stoves into the Western Canada markets. 
The different Utters show that our last 
week'- summary was about correct. 

An important factor in the situation 
is the enormous increase in production 
in 1905. In 1903 and 1904, so strong 
was the demand that practically no 
stocks were left in the hands of manu- 
facturers. It was hard to supply th<? 
call for goods in the Spring and the 
customary closing down for repairs, 
stock-taking and over-hauling in mid- 
winter had to he decreased from six or 
eight weeks to about two. This condi- 
tion led tin. st stove producers to in- 
crease and in some eases double the 
capacity of their foundries in 1905. It 
is not surprising that there is an over- 
plus of stock this year in the face of 
adverse trade conditions. On the other 
hand, it is eminently satisfactory that 
nearly every manufacturer reports in- 
creased sales in 1905. Had weather con- 
ditions been satisfactory the past year's 
business would have far outstripped any 
previous season's total sales. The de- 
mand for stoves and ranges in the 
Spring is likely to be very large and the 
stock carried over will serve a useful 
purpose in giving the trade a good start 
in the coming season's trade. 

The higher prices now being asked 
by American manufacturers, and the 
tact that there is every likelihood of an 
additional duty being imposed upon Am- 
erican goods, will mean that the western 
market will be a better one for eastern 
manufacturers this year than last. The 
nt duty has not prevented the 
dumping of American stoves into Canada 
and the entire stove trade will endorse 
the Dominion Government's suggested 
action in remedying this evil. 

There does not appear to he a unanim- 
ity of opinion regarding higher prices 
iii 1906, various factors being in opera- 
tion to make difficult the advance in 
prices the exceptionally strong condi- 
tions existing in the metal markets 
would seem to warrant. Two of the let- 
ters are unsigned, the writers request- 
in- that their signatures he omitted. 
The letters follow. 
"Editor Hardware ami Metal. 

"Dear Sir,— Business tor 1905 in 
sections of the country wa- belter than 
in 1004. and in other sections not quite 
. the result being about on a 



par. Open weather during the Kail, in 
our opinion, affected the demand for 
heating stoves quite seriously. 

"We are not acquainted with the 
stocks id' other manufacturers, hut our 
stock carried over is about normal. 

"American competition in Western 
Canada has been very acute, nearly half 
a million dollars worth of stoves having 
been imported. 

'•We look for a satisfactory year in 
190G. owing to continued immigration, 
and the fact taht the United States 
manufacturers, being very busy, will not 
be so inclined to compete so cheaply for 
this market. 

"In view of this competition, we feel 
that notwithstanding the advance in 
cost of raw material, it would be imprac- 
ticable to advance prices, but_in conse- 
quence of this advance, prices must at 
least remain firm. 

"We remain, yours truly, 

"THE McCLARY MFG. CO." 

London, Dec. 26, 1905. 



"Editor Hardware and Metal. 

"Dear Sir,— The business of 1905 has 
been somewhat smaller than that of 
1904. The open Fall affected the stove 
trade to some extent, but we do not 
think that many retail dealers are left 
with large stocks, as our customers were 
very cautious about ordering. We are 
carrying over a somewhat larger stock 
of goods than usual. 

"American competition has seriously 
effected business in Western Canada, 
and this indeed is the Drincipal cause 
of the decrease in the volume of business 
this year. The American stove dealers 
send their travelers all through that 
region to call on the retail trade. They 
offer great inducements in way of price 
and terms, and in many cases have of- 
fered goods at prices lower than we 
could manufacture them. The dump- 
ing' clause does not appear to have any 
good effect, and the only adequate rem- 
edy for this state of affairs is to in- 
crease the duty considerably, and per- 
haps add a specific duty. 

"The outlook for next year we be- 
lieve is very good, as our customers are 
not over-stocked, and if the Government 
will take any action in way of increas- 
ing the duty, we look for a very large 
business in the west. 

"We think the present high price of 
metal indicates somewhat higher prices 
Cot stoves next year, unless severe Am- 
erican competition prevents. 

" Yours truly) 

"BURROW, STEWART & MILNE CO.. 

Limited." 

Hamilton, Dec. 29, 1905. 
40 



"Editor Hardware and Metal. 

" Dear Sir, — Business for 1905 has been 
larger than previous years. Stove 
trade has been affected to some extent 
by the open weather this Fall, and in 

some lines there is a larger quantity 
of goods carried over than usual. 

"Trade in Western Canada has cer- 
tainly been affected by American com- 
petition. The remedy was suggested to 

the Tariff Commission by the representa- 
tives id' the stove interests. 

"We are, however, unable to predict 
the probable course of prices next 
Spring. Other factors may prevent the 
higher prices of raw material having 
the effect that would be expected. 

"Wishing Hardware and Metal a 
prosperous New Year, 

"Yours truly, 

"THE JAMES SMART MFG. CO., 

Brockville, Limited." 
Biockville, Dec. 30, 1905. 



" Editor Hardware and Metal. 

"Dear Sir,— We are not in a position 
to give you the information you require 
for the reason that we have only been 
in business a little over one year. We 
first started to ship goods in September. 
1904. September, October and Novem- 
ber, 1905, has shown an increase of 200 
per cent., but, as stated, this is only our 
second year. Our outlook for 1906 is 
especially good and we anticipate that 
prices will be about the same. 

"With regard to American competi- 
tion, would say that the same is being 
felt in Western Canada, especially in 
cheaper lines. Stove foundries in Wis- 
consin, on account of their near loca- 
tion to Western Canada, and aided by 
the fact that American freight rates are 
very much lower than Canadian rates, 
can effect our trade materially. We 
believe that an increase in duty of, say, 
one cent per pound would not only pre- 
vent our country being flooded with 
cheap stoves, but at the same time pre- 
serve the western market for Canadian 
manufacturers. The fact that there are 
some 40 firms making- stoves in Canada, 
would keep prices on a fair basis. 
"We are, yours very truly, 

"WALKER STEEL RANGE CO., 

Limited." 
Grimsby, Dec. 28, 1905. 

* * * 

"Editor Hardware and Metal. 

'•Dear Sir. -There has been a larger 
volume of business in 1905 than in prev- 
ious years, but the supply of goods, and 
the capacity to produce stoves, has also 
been more in keeping with the demand. 

"The open Fall seems to have affected 
trade to a certain extent. We find that 
as a general thing the retailers have 
more stock on hand than they had in 
December, iTJuT. Manufacturers also 
seem to have larger stocks than they 
did a year ago. 

"In Western Canada, we have felt the 
influence of American competition, and 
we believe that if a market is to be kept 
for eastern manufacturers, some addi- 
tional duty will have to be imposed, or 



January 6, 1906 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metui 



Ventilation is Important 



as a feature of modern buildings. 

There are many buildings and residences, 
whose occupants are afflicted with drowsiness 
and headaches, because the ventilation is im- 
perfect, or has been altogether neglected. 

THE AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

is unexcelled as a means of producing pure 
air in large buildings, closet rooms, vaults of 
churches, schools, factories, stables, etc. 

As will be seen from the accompanying il- 
lustration, The Aeolian Ventilator is very 
ornamental in appearance, while also posses- 
sing exceptional lasting qualities. 

We like to talk about the "Aeolian" 

Will you write us for particulars ? 

Read this testimonial : 

OSHAWA, June 4th, 1903 

Messrs. The J. W. Harris Co., Limited, Montreal. 

Dear Sirs,— Replying- to your favor of May .'j(lth. 

would say that the "Zephyr" Ventilator is giving: 

good satisfaction. 

Yours respectfully, 

J. E. Hawkins. 
The Price is Inconsiderable in Comparison with the Results. 
Manufactured by 

THE J. W. HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 

SUCCESSORS TO LESSARD & HARRIS, CONTRACTORS 
Montreal 




THE AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

(Can lie supplied in cop- 
per, if so desired.) 




Have You 
THE 



EMPIRE 

QUEEN 

RANGE 

for sale in your 
store ' Do you in- 
tend to write tor 
Booklet describing 
same? It is im- 
portant that you 
should make a de- 
cision — most im- 
portant that it be the right decision. The stove that sells, the stove 
that pleases, is the kind you want to handle. The Empire Qusen 
Range is just that kind of stove. 

If you desire profit for yourself and satisfaction for your customers, 
sell The Empire Queen Range. 

@ur Booklet costs you nothing. But it contains something of 
value to you. Would you like a copy? 



\ 



The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Go. 

OWEN SOUND, Ontario 



Limited 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limited, 238 King St., Winnipeg, Man., 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., 126 West Craig St., 
Montreal, Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



y^^^^^^^^^^^^^AV V VVVVVVVVVVSrVVVViiVWii' 




Tell your Customers that CHRISTMAS TURKEY 
roasted In the oven of 

THE JOY MALLEABLE AND STEEL RANGE 

was a palatable dish. Why ! Because the oven, being air-tight, has the same effect 
as a DOUBLE ROASTING PAN. Keeps the delicious flavors in the fowl, and keeps 
the gases, ashes, soot and smoke from entering the oven and contaminating it. A 
result only obtainable in a malleable and steel construction. 

You need them. 



We have the Ranges. 



A postal will bring descriptive matter. 



THE JOY MANUFACTURING CO. 



32 William Ave., 

SrVAWSrW 



TORONTO 



18 feet of 

Clothes 

Line 



Warranted 

not 

to rust 




E. T. WRIGHT & CO., 



B. & W. Elevating Clothes Dryer 

Patented Sept. 12th, 1905 

This Illustration, No. 2, shows the B. & W. Clothes Line 
lowered and spread ready to receive the clothes. 

When Clothes are all hung, the line is raised to within 
a few inches of the ceiling by means of a small rope 
pulley— a child can operate it. 

FOR SALE BY 

Hamilton, Canada 

41 



Hardware and Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



January 6, 1906 




It Pays the hardware dealer to feature the Oxford lines. 

We have educated the people up to an appreciation of the Quality, Beauty and 
Solidity of every range we market. 

Merit and Systematic Advertising have created an immense demand for the 
Oxford lines. These factors should mean dollars for you. 

If popularity counts for anything you should have the 

Imperial Oxford Range 

on your floor. There are over 40,000 of these ranges in use in Canada to-day. 

The beauty of the Imperial Oxford attracts the prospective range-buyer at once 
and tells its own story about being easily kept clean. 

The diffusive oven flue, exclusive to the Imperial Oxford, is the most practical 
and economical improvement in oven construction ever made. 

There are other strong talking points which we need only enumerate to you, as 
a practical man, without comment. 

The Draw-out Oven Rack, the Duplex Grate, the Thermometer and the 
Accurately-proportioned, Iron-stone-lined Fire-box. Show and explain what these 
things mean in baking and roasting, how easily repairs can be made, and you have 
the profits of an Imperial Oxford in your pocket. 

WE also manufacture Steel Plate Ranges, Gas Stoves, Ranges and Heaters, Hotel Ranges, Hot Water and 
Steam Boilers and Radiators. Warm Air Furnaces and all kinds of cooking and heating apparatus, Plumbers' Supplies. 

Write for Catalogue 61 

The Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 82 

The Gurney-Massey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. The Gurney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta. 




Our guarantee.bondjgoes witlf each range. 



Grimsby, Ont., Jan. j, 1906. 
To the Trade : 

In extending to you our very best wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year, we 
trust the past year has yielded both pleasure and profit and that the experience gained will 
enable you better than ever to push onward to the goal of success. 

For our customers of 1905 we have the most kindly feeling. We appreciate their 
favors and kindnesses and most sincerely hope to have a continuation of same. 

On the other hand, added facilities and new lines will enable us to serve you better than 
ever and to care for those new customers which we earnestly hope to secure. 

For 1906 we call your attention to 

Walker Stoves and Ranges 

" SUCCESSFUL EVERYWHERE " 

and wish to say that all our experience, energy and time will be devoted to making 
good this motto. 

Sincerely yours, 

The Walker Steel Range Company, unite* 

Grimsby, Ont. 

42 



January 6, 1906 



STOVBS AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal 




f .l . .« l jH I' |. ' 







" VICTORIA " IMPROVED 
COAL GRATE 

24%x30%. Dump Grate. Double Damper 



Mantel 
Coal Grates 

We are making a special run 
on this coal grate. 

Finished in Oxidized Copper, 
Brass, or Dull Black. 

WRITE FOR QUOTATIONS TO-DAY 

Whittaker Stove Works 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



A BRIGHT STORE 

PLEASES YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTS BUSINESS 
SAVES TIME 



A modern Acetylene plant will light 
store perfectly and economically, 
us about it. 



your 
Ask 



THE CONTINENTAL HEAT & LI6HT GO. 



MONTREAL 




6. F. STERNE & SON, MANUFAC ™ E ^, 



BRANTFORD, ONT. 



A NEW D 



ARTURI 



Sterne's 

Asbestos Stove and 

Furnace Cement 

is a gray or lasting color and 
will not show objectionable 
streaks on stove or furnace after 
being mounted. . 

It is the strongest and most 
durable cement on the market 
for setting up and repairing 
broken joints in Furnaces, 
Ranges, Heaters, Stoves, etc. 

Every bit GUARANTEED. 



The Perfection Safety Furnace Pipe Co. 

MANFRS. OF ALL KINDS OF 

Hot Air Pipe, round or square, 

Elbows, Angles, Register Boxes, etc., 

Galvanized Cola Air and Smoke Pipes. 

Galvanized casiDgs n ade for any make of Furnace. Our pipe is made to save you 
time, labor and material. Seven to ten feet of pipe saved in every hundred 
Fittings made to fit. Made by specially adapted machinery, and under the aupervis 
ion of practical furnace men of long experience. 

We al»o lay out furnace jobs for our customers free of charge. 

Freight paid on all orders of 500 feet or over. See terms, etc., in our oatalogu 
•heet, which will be sent upon application. 

Prompt Shipments— Goods Properly Crated. 



No. 3 Brookfleld Street, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



_ t 



♦ 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 

The New 



National Oak i 



HeaLer 



For Hard or Soft Coal, Lignite, Coke or Wood 

Smoke consuming. Double Heater from floor. 
Duplex Grates. Double Mica Door. Straight, Deep 
Firepot. Deep Reflector Ring. Hot Blast Ring is 
entirely outside — does not obstruct interior. Smoke 
Pipe Collar is in rear of double-heating collar. No 
Elbows or Offsets required to connect with double- 
heating flue. 




Mad* only by 



the MOFFAT STOVE CO., limited 



WINNIPEG 



WESTON, ONT. 



CALCARY 



No other manufacturer in the world has a stove just like 
this. In brief, it's the biggest, tallest and best stove of its kind ever 
offered. Places you absolutely beyond competition. Seize the oppor- 
tunity and write for the agency to-day. 



43 



Hardware and Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



January 6, 1906 



Canada Horse Nail Company. 

HARDWARE TRADE PRICE LIST. 



THE 



c 



BRAND 



HORSE SHOE NAILS 

Hot Forged from Swedish Charcoal Steel. 







Revised 


List 


adopted 


January 


1st, 


1906. 






No. 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 


Length 


If 


v> 


H 


H 


2| 


H 


2| 


H 


2* 


3£ in. 


Per lb. 


40 


32 


28 


26 


24 


22 


20 


20 


20 


20 eta 


Per Box 


S10.00 


8.00 


7.00 


6.50 


6.00 


5.50 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 



lu boxes of 25 lbs. each ; either loose, or in 5 lb. cardboard packages. 
In one pound cardboard packages, an extra charge of |c. per lb. net. 
Oval and Countersunk patterns; Sizes No. 4 to No. 14. 
Short Oval and Short Countersunk patterns : Sizes No. 1 to No. 8. 

TURF NAILS. 

For Racing Plates, and Light Trotting Shoes. 
EXTRA SELECTED. 



Short Oval and Short Countersunk Patterns. 
In one pound cardboard Packages only. 



PATTERNS AND SIZES. 
Oval Head. Short Oval. 



Size No. 


1 


2 


3 


Length 


1* 


If 


If in. 


Per lb. 


S2.00 


1.25 


.75 cts. 




Nos. 4 to 14. 
Countersunk Head. 



Nos. 1 to 8. 
Short Countersunk. 




Nos. 5 to 12. 



Nos. 1 to 8. 



TERMS AND CONDITIONS: 

DELIVERY : Free on board cars or boat at Montreal. 

Freight, equalized from Factory points of St. John, N.B., and Toronto, Out. 

TERMS OF SALE : Cash 30 days, less 2°/ o discount; all accounts to be settled foi 
by acceptance or remittance within 30 days from 1st of month following sale. 

TRADE DISCOUNT: 40 and 10 and 7|% from List prices. 



Montreal, January 1st, 1906. 



Canada Horse Nail Company. 



Cancelling all previous Lisl prices and quotations. 

44 



raw materials will have I" be admitted 
free. 

"We believe thai a specific duty, in 
addition to the nresent ad valorem duty, 
would be the most satisfactory way of 
- « < - 1 . i i; g I his result. 

"Prospects for next year arc bright, 
and there is every indication that it 
will be an excellent stove year. On 
December 20, the stove manufacturers in 
the Western States, with headquarters 
al Chicago, advanced their prices 5 per 

ci nt. As the same conditions which in- 
fluenced the increase there, prevail in 
this country, there is every possibility of 
an increase in the price of stoves for 
1906. 

"Yours truly," 

Dec. 26, 1905. (Signed.) 

* * * 
" Rditpr Hardware and Metal. 

'"Dear Sir,— Our business is about the 
same this year as last, and considerably 
more than previous to 1904. The open 
Kail has affected trade considerably. We 
do not think' many of our customers are 
earrving over stoves, although we be- 
lieve there are a good many stoves be- 
in- carried over by the dealers generally. 
We are carrying the usual amount of 
fioods over stock-taking. 

"American competition has decidedly 
affected our trade in Western Canada, 
and every effort should be taken in the 
interests of the trade, the Canadian 
manufacturer, and Canadian labor, to 
prevent as far as possible United States 
goods being dumped into this country 
next year, and in future, as they were in 
1004 and 1905. 

We are quite sanguine as regards 
next year's business and we look for a 
good year. In regard to the higher 
price of metals, it remains to be seen to 
what extent same will affect stove prices 
for next season. 

"Yours trulv " 

Dec. 26, 1905. (Signed.) 

ADVERTISE STOVES NOW. 

Too many stove men are prone to 
"lay down" at this season. They fig- 
ure that the heaters are all sold for 
this Winter, and the cooks and ranges 
will not begin to move until Spring. 
This is a mistake, says the Hardware. 
Trade. The heaters are never all sold 
until the frost is. out of the ground. 
You cannot expect to do a November 
business in January, but there will be 
stoves sold this month by every enter- 
prising stove dealer. There are always 
people moving— going and coming. They 
will want a stove when they arrive in 
vour town. Then there are many house- 
holds established along about the first 
of the year. Each of these will want 
one stove and possibly two or three. 
Then stoves will give out. When the 
weather becomes very cold and it is 
evident that the old heater is not suffi- 
cient any more, that means business for 
the stove man. And so it goes. Every 
month in the year produces stove trade, 
and January is not the least of them. 
Make it the best of the "off" months. 
As to cooks and ranges, there is no 
season for them, and the circumstances 
may be such that you can sell more 
cook stoves in January than you did in 
November. Tt is entirely possible. Try 
it and see. 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTFSEHENTS. 

Advertisements under this heading, '_V. .i word first 
insertion ; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompanj all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule he overlooked. 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



ENGLISHMAN, exceptional Canadian and 
I— BritisJi experience ; capable reliable worker ; 
hardware office or store; used to managing work- 
ing business. Palmer, 122 McGill, Toronto, 
Ontario. [S2-2] 

DY you^g man, bookkeeper, experienced in 
D figuring steam, hot water and warm air. 
Apply Box 234, Hardware and Metal, [i] 



SUPERINTENDENT WANTED. 

FIRST-CLASS man to take full management of 
Furnace and Stove plant ; would prefer if he 
would take a financial interest in the business, 
which will bear the closest of investigation. Ad- 
dress Room "C" Confederation Life Building, 
Toronto. [52-2] 

BUSINESS CHANCES. 

A FLOURISHING hardware business in the 
growing village of Caron, surrounded by an 
excellent country. This is an exceptional oppor- 
tunity to a man with $2,000 cash. Box 12, 
Caron, Sask. [1] 



FOR SALE. 



TIN and Stove Business for sale in the best mar- 
ket town in Ontario ; 45 miles from Hamilton; 
the leading tin business in Dunnvilie ; also a large 
stove and furnace trade ; a good chance for a 
quick I uyer ; ill-health cause for selling. C.J. 
Werner, Dunnvilie. [1] 

HARDWARE business in good town, surrounded 
by best farming country in Canada. Stock 
|5,o o; turn-over g25,cooperannum. Good profits. 
Reason for selling, dissolution of partnership. 
Address Box 139, HARDWARE AND METAL. [4] 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 

WANTED tinsmith, good all-around man. 
Yearly job. Must be temperate. Single 
man preferred. State wages and experience. 
Porteous Bros., Carlyle, Sask. [4] 

\\f ANTED — The Canada Horse Nail Com- 
"' pany, Montreal, invite applications for a 
position in their office. The duties requirt d are 
those pertaining to general office work, and ability 
to take charge of wages r.nd pay roll, shipping, 
customers' ledger, etc.; must be a good penman 
and accurate in accounts; satisfactory references 
required as to character. [1] 



STOVE MANUFACTURERS 

branch in Canada 
"stoves, it will be to yout 
interest to communicate with A. B., Room C, 
Confederation Life Building Toronto. [52-2] 



IF you intend opening up 
for the manufacture of stc 



WANTED 



XX/ANTED— To buy a small established hard- 
"* ware business, Ontario preferred. Write 
Box :8o, Hardware and Metal. [52] 

\1/ ANTED— Two first-class tinners for furnace 
" work; $325 per day, eight hours; steady 
employment. Apply The Wm. Ralph Co.. Van 



couver, B.C. 



[Si] 



Important to Babbitt Users 



W h) p&J for a name ? Be up-to-date and 
have your babbitt made according to your 
own Formula, or if you have no formula send 
a sample of what you are using and we will 
quote you price on same quality, All form- 
ulas made to order. 

Long Distance Telephone Main 4315 

CANADA SMELTING CO. 



STANDARD 



Limited 
Babbitt Metal, Phosphor Tin, 



Needle Metal, Type Metal, Etc. 
Cor. Brennan and Ann Sts., MONTREAL 



MEND YOUR OWN BOOTS, 

HARNESS, ETC. 

"ALL-U-WANT." 





MBIT soL.eAO.ENTS 

AWL-U-WANT CO. 

79 East Front St. TORONTO 



DRAFT EXCLUDER 



The patents, or rights to manufacture 
a draft excluder are for sale for Canada 
and the United States. The Draft Ex- 
cluder is an English invention and is re- 
garded as the most effective appliance 
that has yet been produced. It can be 
fastened on any door in a few minutes. 
It is so constructed that when the door 
closes., wind, water and even air are pre- 
vented from passing between the foot ot 
the door and the floor. It is strong and 
durable, but at the same time light 
and neat and does not in any way dis- 
figure the door to which it may be 
attached. 

The chief feature of its superiority over 
others is that when the door is closed the 
Excluder presses very firmly against 
the floor, yet the moment the door is 
opened even the smallest degree the pres- 
sure is released, so that the door may 
swing backwards and forwards as freely 
as if there were no appliance upon it. 

It goes on upon the inside of the door. 

COST OF PRODUCTION 

The Excluder is constructed of mild 
sheet metal and rubber, and it costs in 
England about three shillings and three 
pence to produce each Excluder. The 
rubber may be replaced by wood and in 
that case the cost of production would 
be reduced to about two shillings and 
six pence. These calculations are based 
on cost of steel and rubber in England. 

Address inquiries to 
SOLICITOR, care of Hardware and Metal 
Toronto Office. (tf) 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



STREET PA VINO and SIDBWALKS a SPECIALTY 

SILICA BARYTIG STONE GO. 

OF ONTARIO Limited 

Head Office : 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills, General Manager 
Ask for quotations for 
Septio Tanks. 



Watir Proof Floors for 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel- 
lar, Stable Floors, etc- 



Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket Is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothino Bet- 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Rtrong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direot or through your jobber. 
ATLA8 MFG. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S. A 

"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLE8 D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works 

"Machinery " Newport Newport. Mom., England 





Covert Mfg. Go. 

TROY, N.Y. 



Harness Snaps, Chain, 
Rope and Web Goodi, 
etc. For sale by Jobben 
at Manufacturers' prices. 



7 77 



U8E 

"HERCULES" BRAND 
PORTLAND CEMENT 

Manufactured by 

THE GREY & BRUCE PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

OWEN SOUND 

J. MoLATJCHLAN, President. 

-.«....«..«..».....«..«..«.....,.., ..«..»..»~«..»...w»„...,„ # _- 

1 THE IMPERIAL CEMENT CO., Limited j 

? Makers of the Celebrated Brand f 

"IMPERIAL" PRTLAND CEMENT I 

I OWEN SOUND, ONT. j 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS* I 

'BA^.^a ° -^^Pl»rgest Variety, I _■ 

t^f^Z^^yVl Toilet, Hand, Electric Powerl (* 

V ARE THE BEST. «| f 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep -Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOE OATALOGrTE TO tggf 

Ajurleu Shearer Big. Co., Nashua, S.H..E81 







Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited special New.York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 



FULL STOCK ... 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



I 



slUIpipe 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, OUT. TORONTO. ONT 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



45 



Hardware and Metal 



January 6, 1^06 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Class 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



WINDOW 

GLASS 



PLATE 

GLASS 



TORONTO 

MONTREAL 

OTTAWA 

LONDON 

WINNIPEG 



Building and Industrial News 

h w:i'\v \ i: i i\ii \iiiai, would be pteased'to reoeiri from tun authoritative source building and industrial news 

Sort, the formation oi incorporation of runiiunus. I'stiiMisluiiiMit "r riiliu-giiiii'tit of mills, 

ractorii s. foundries it other works, railway or mining newa All correspondence « ill be 
i n ated as confidential when desired. 



The London Tool Co. ^vill remove 
their plant to Hamilton in February. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway pro- 
pose to construct a line of railway from 
Woodstock to Niagara Falls, through 
Hamilton. 

The name of the Cobban Mfg. Co., 
Toronto, has been changed to the 
Phillips Mfg. Co. The personnel of the 
company remains unchanged. 

Willis Chipman, Toronto, has pre- 
pared plans for the development of 
wafer power near Prince Albert, Sask., 
to supply that town with water. 

It is said that the Lake of the Woods 
Milling Co. propose duplicating their 
large mills at Keenwaning. Engineers 
are now at work on the surveying of a 
site. 

William Russell, representing the In- 
dependent Harvesters Company, of Chi- 
cago, has written Mayor Ferguson of 
Stratford in regard to locating a 
branch there. 

J. B. Little, of the Edmonton Press- 
ed Brick Co., has purchased machinery 
for the doubling of the capacity of the 
company's plant. Their output has 
been at the rate of 30,000 brick per 
day. 

The Edmonton Lumber Co., capital- 
ized at $60,000, has been organized, and 
a logging" camp has been established 
eighty miles above Edmonton, on the 
Saskatchewan River, where a larere mill 
will be erected. A. H. Clark, Edmon- 
ton, is promoter of the enterprise. 

It is understood that the Truro 
Knitting Mills Co.. Truro, N.S., will 
greatly enlarge their already extensive 
plant bv bringing in new capital and 
making- the larerest woolen manufactur- 
ing plant on the continent. A short 
time ago 27 acres of land were pur- 
chased in Truro, and it is likely the 
new plant will be erected there. 

The Bullwell Coal & Iron Co. has 
been organized at Lethbride-e. The 
capitalization is $1,500,000. The direc- 
tors are Lieutenant-Governor Bulvea, 
Edmonton: Dr. C. W. Clark. Winnineg; 
Ci. S. Stephens, Winnipeg; C. Padlev, 
T.othbridge. and Thomas Underwood. 
Calgary. The companv owns 5,000 
acres of coal land near Lethbridge. 

During the anproaching session of the 
Dominion Parliament, application will 
be made bv the Victoria and Nanaimo 
boards of trade and other commercial 
bodies, for an appronriation sufficient 
to cover the cost of survevs and an 
authoritative report as to the expendi- 
ture armroximatelv involved should it 
be decided to give Vancouver Island 
connection with the Canadian main- 
land bv means of a railway bridere. 

The rail mill of the Dominion Iron & 
Steel Co. broke another record last 
week, when 700 tons of steel rails were 
put through the process, placed in 
stock, and made ready for the market. 
The companv was under contract to 
furnish the Grand Trunk Railway, be- 

46 



fore the end of the year, with 25,001) 
• mis of rails, and up to the middle of 
December about 20,000 tons had been 
delivered. The Grand Trunk people 
were so well pleased with the article 
received that a duplicate order has been 
placed for delivery in May, .June, July 
and August of the current year. 

The citizens of Sandwich and Windsor 
are certain that the United States 
Steel Co. will complete the purchase of 
the property it has under option at 
Sandwich, and build the $10,000,000 
steel plant talked of some months ago. 
All of the options have been renewed, 
and representatives of the United 
States Steel Company have taken 
soundings all along the Detroit River 
shore in front of the property under 
option. This is taken to mean that 
the location of the docks is being de- 
cided upon, and that the new plant 
will probably begin as soon as Spring 
opens. 

Mr. P. B. McNamara, Canadian com- 
mercial agent at Manchester, tells Can- 
adian manufacturers that they should 
study the requirements of the whole- 
sale markets in England. Too often 
they assume that goods intended for 
Canadians will suit the English buyer. 
The trade in England requires the 
cheapest kind of goods in order to com- 
pete successfully with the Continental 
and United States manufacturers in the 
same lines. As a case in point he cites 
building hardware, on which the Can- 
adian traveler could only offer a dis- 
count of 7h per cent., whereas the 
United States traveler could offer 20 
per cent., because he had cheaper grades 
to dispose of. 

The Temiskaming & Northern Ontario 
Railway, built, owned and operated by 
the Ontario Government, has yielded a 
net profit for the first year's business 
of over $100,000, a cheque for which 
was presented to the provincial treas- 
urer a few days ago. The road now in 
operation is 113 miles long, and a fur- 
ther extension of 40 miles is almost 
completed, while yet another 40 miles 
will bring it to a iunction with the 
G.T.P. From Jan. ' 16 to Dec. 21 it 
carried 75,000 passengers, and 90,000 
tons of freight. Rolling stock was in- 
sufficient to cope with the increased 
traffic. 

At the sitting of the Tariff Commis- 
sion at Three Rivers, last week, Mr. 
G. R. Duncan, manager of the Mont- 
real Pipe Foundry, pleaded for an in- 
creased duty on iron pipes. He main- 
tained that Scotch and English pipe 
could be put down in Canada at such 
rates as to cripple the industry in Can- 
ada, the reason being that they had ad- 
vantages in the matter of pig iron, 
wages, freight rates, and fuel. In the 
matter of wages, he contended that in 
Canada we pay the American rates. 
Men in their w<rrks received $1.75 to 
$2.25 per day, while the same class can 
be had in, Britain for $1.35 to $1.50 per 
day. Instead of $5,35 per ton, Mr, 



January 6, 1906 



BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION 



Hardware and Metal 



Duncan pleaded for a minimum of duty 
of $8, the cost of a ton of pipe in .Eng- 
land being $22. Mr. Gelineas, manu- 
facturer of chains and snow shovels, 
and Mr. O. Carignan, manufacturer of 
paints from Canadian ores, pleaded for 
increased protection in their respective 
trades. 

By-laws were voted on New Year's 
Day in a number of municipalities, and 
in the majority of places were endorsed 
by the electorate. Stratford badly de- 
feated a by-law for $33,335 for a storm 
sewerage and for a proposed box fac- 
tory. Barrie carried by good majori- 
ties a by-law to Iraise $b,500 for # streets 
and sidewalks, and another to provide 
$1,500 for an electric lire alarm sys- 
tem. The Keenan Loan By-law in Owen 
Sound, to grant a loan of $25,000 to 
assist in increasing the plant of the fac- 
tory, carried by a majority of nearly -1 
to 1. Peterborough carried a $25/000 
by-law for better tire protection by a 
small majority. Two by-laws were car- 
ried in Hamilton, one to raise $20,000 
to build a storm water sewerage sys- 
tem, and the other to raise $35,000 to 
complete the hospital improvements. 
Bobcaygeon unanimously carried the 
by-law for $25,000 to purchase the M. 
Bpyd Co.'s water power and establish 
an electric plant by the village. Picton 
carried a by-law to raise $15,000 for a 
new street lighting system by 144 ma- 
jority. Prescott defeated a by-law for 
the extension of its sewerage system. 
Clinton declined to endorse a by-law to 
raise $20,000 on a system of water 
works in connection with the town. 
Aurora's by-law to raise $10,000 to im- 
prove the water works system was car- 
ried by two-thirds majority. Wingham 
carried three by-laws by substantial 
majorities, one fixing the rale of as- 
sessment of a door factory at present 
rate for ten years, another to issue de- 
bentures for $1,500 for building a 
bridge, and another to establish a 
High school. Brantford's by-law for 
$45,000 for school improvement carried 
by 300 majority. 

Companies Incorporated. 

The Lake Superior Corporation, a 
company incorporated in the State of 
New Jersey, has been given the right 
to carry on business in Ontario, pro- 
vided thev do not use a larger capital 
than $1,000,000. 

Dominion Improvement & Develop- 
ment Co., a corporation incorporated 



NO DEALER 

ever had a better chance to do a rifle business than 
he has now with 

MODEL No. 23 

THE HAMILTON RIFLE 

obtainable. The merits of this rifle are so well- 
known by those who have used it that the marvel 
is : "How can so good a rifle sell at $3.50 V 

It does seem absurd ; but the secret is to be 
found in the process by which Model No. 23 is 

made. The patents belong to us exclusively. 

Lower price, higher quality, is a distinctly 
Hamilton Rifle feature. 

Don't miss the chance. Ask your jobber about 
Model No. 23. 



THE HAMILTON RIFLE CO. 



DEPT. 71 



PLYMOUTH, MICH. 



Heekert, W. A. McCutcheon, H. 0. 
Patch and S. M. McElroy, all of Pitts- 
burgh, Penn. 

The Ontario Cobalt ' Developing Co., 
Toronto, share capital $350,000; pur- 
pose, to carry on the operations of a 
mining, milling, reduction and develop- 
ment company. The directors are S. 
M. Hay, J. W. Curry and E. E. Wal- 
lace, of Toronto; J . Bingeman, of Ber- 
lin, and J. K. Paisley, of Ottawa. 



INJUNCTION AGAINST INSPECTOR. 

A rather peculiar development has re- 
cently transpired in Montreal building 
circles. Last October a permit was 
taken out by E. Godin for a reinforced 




in the State of New York, have been 
given the right to carry on business in 
Ontario, provided they do not use a 
larger capital than $10,000. 

The Pittsburg-Cobalt Co., Toronto, 
share capital $75,000; purpose, to carry 
on the operations of a mining, milling, 
reduction and development company. 
The directors are C. D. Robbins, S. P. 



Door Bolt. 



concrete building on Dorchester street, 
near Matthew. But when the work was 
begun a few weeks ago it was found 
that instead of reinforced concrete the 
builders were using slabs of artificial 
stone set upright, and fastened together 
with wire. When .hey were notified 
that they were not building in accord- 
ance with the city's by-law, their an- 

47 



swer was an injunction issued by the 
contractor against the building inspec- 
tor. It is claimed by the contractor 
that he is putting up a building of ex- 
traordinary strength, and that the city 
gave approval. Building Inspector 
Ohausse, however, says that positive 
proof "will be required that the system 
is a good one before the work will be 
allowed to go on. 



SHELBY DOOR BOLT. 

The Shelby Spring Hinge Co., Shelby, 
Ohio, are placing on the market the 
Shelby door bolt, illustrated herewith. 
It is neat in appearance and has a 
slight emboss on the edges to improve 
the appearance and strengthen the 
frame. It is made in all the hardware 
finishes and also in japan. Dealers in- 
terested enough to send for further in- 
formation will kindly mention this pa- 
per. 



TORONTO'S BUILDING RECORD. 

During December building permits weie 
issued in Toronto totalling in value 
$604,350, compared with $262,610 last 
year. This large amount included a per* 
mil for the new Knox Church, which 
will cost $170,000. The tremendous 
building season experienced in Toronto 
is shown by the following table cover- 
ing the past five years : 

1900 $ 1,903,136 

1901 3,568,883 

1902 3,854,923 

1903 4,356,457 

1904 5,896,120 

1905 10,347,910 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION 



January 6, 1906 



BEST ELBOWS 



FOR 



CONDUCTOR 
PURPOSES 

BEAR 
TRADE MARK 




ULQAVmawi^ 



CANNOT BURST 

from 

ICE PRESSURE 



Made in . . . 

6 Materials. 
5 Angles. 
14 Sizes. 
1,225 Varieties. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 

Ferdinand Dieckmann 

1180-82-84 HARRISON AVE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 



Start Right 

Now is the time, with 
stock-taking over, to make 
your plans for a record- 
breaking season's trade for 
1906. 

You can make money 
selling heating goods, but 
you must start right — you 
must have the right agency 
and you may safely follow 
the lead of hundreds of the 
wisest and most successful 
dealers in the trade in 
Canada, by basing your 
season's prospects on the 



Pease 
Economy 



line of heating goods. 

They will cover the 
whole range of your needs 
— save you endless worry 
and annoyance, build up 
your heating business on a 
firm and enduring founda- 
tion and, besides, will make 
substantial profits for you. 

Better Write To-day. 



Pease Foundry Co., 



Limited 



TORONTO 



Pease-Waldon Co., united 

WINNIPEG 



CANADA'S FIRST CEMENT ELEVA- 
TOR. 

The cement elevator and steel tower 
built by the Brackman-ker Milling Co. 
at Strathcona, Alta., is practically 
completed. The lower is of steel b^ 
leet square and 112 feet high. The ele- 
vator is 82 leet to rim and 88 feet to 
peak and has a capacity of 100,000 bush- 
els. It is 40 feet in diameter outside 
measure and 39 feet inside, as the walls 
are six inches thick. About 5liU barrels 
of cement, 1,120 barrels of sand and 
l,Ut U barrels of gravel were used in the 
construction. Three-quarter-inch iron 
rods wind spirally around the centre of 
the wall for the hist 40 feet, £-inch iron 
rods in the same way for the next 30 
feet and then 7-16-inch iron rods from 
70 feet to the top. These spiral iron 
rods are secured to upright half-inch 
straight iron rods, 12 inches apart in 
the centre of the wall from base to 
summit. The latest improved rope- 
driven machinery is installed in a sub- 
terranean passage between the mill and 
elevator and is capable of discharging 
2,000 bushels per hour into the mill. 
The design of the structure and accesso- 
ries is that of Elsi Heidenrich, Chicago. 
The work was commenced September 15 
and cost about $18,000. 

BUILDING NOTES. 

The cotton mill buildings at Hamil- 
ton are to be enlarged. 

The Brantford Ice Company are to 
build a $5,000 ice house. 

D. B. Jack, St. John, N.B., is to 
erect a large brick store building. 

The Sawyer-Massey Company, of Ham- 
ilton, are to erect a large warehouse at 
Saskatoon. 

Messrs. Knight & Stitt will erect a 
new hour mill at Eganville with a capa- 
city of 100 barrels a day. 

The National Trust Company, Toron- 
to, will erect an office building at Sas- 
katoon. A site has been secured. 

The coal sheds of the International 
Portland Cement Company at Hull, 
Que., were destroyed by fire last week. 
The loss will amount to about $10,000, 
fully covered by insurance. 

Belleville reports 1905 to have been 
the best building year in its history. 
The new buildings included St. Michael's 
Church, Quinte Laundry premises, Dea- 
con shirt factory, extensive additions to 
the Lock > factory, St. Agnes school, 
Cooper's grist mill, Linghorn's grist 
mill, and the Pitchie Company's prem- 
ises. The Corby Distillery Company 
will spend upwards of a million dollars 
next year in extending their plant and 
the Lehigh Valley Cement Works will 
be erected. 



Traffic on the Cape Breton Division of 
the C'.l'.K. lias broke all records. Day ami 
night trains have been moving constantly 
and besides hundreds of cars of coal sent 
forward, the shipments from the steel 
mills have been unusually heavy. In one 
day's shipment was included thirty-six 
cars of Dominion Iron & Steel pro- 
ducts and thirty cars of pig 
iron and ingots from North Syd- 
ney Junction, the latter being the 
products of the Nova Seotia Steel & 
Coal Co. During the week over 140 cars 
of steel and iron goods were shipped 
from Sydney. 



48 



January 6, 1906 



BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION 



Hardware and Metal 



LUMINION 



AtV» B*„ 



a 



>f 




TARRED rtLT 



» DOMINON BRAND 

IF YOU WANT TO CATCH THE TRADE AND HOLD IT, 

HANDLE OUR QUICK-SELLING LINES OF 

Tarred Felt, Roofing Pitch «Coal Tar 
LOCKERBY £> McCOMB,« 5 shannon *t., Montreal 



LEADERS IN BUSINESS 

Are those who have a purpose, who recognize no such word as " fail," who keep their hands upon the throttle, and their eyes upon the rail. 

Their switch light always burns biightly, casting its beams along the safety track. The crafty salesman can easily approach them, and will 
receive courteous treatment. But he finds all switches set and locked against the "Not-in-demand — Not-advertised — No-special-merit" article 
that has been neither time tried nor time tested. 

In no line has this fact been exemplified better than in the sale of wall-coatings. 
CHURCH'S 

ALABASTINE 

is always on sale by the "leaders" in ev^ry town. It is the Canadian-made goods, NOT AN INFRINGEMENT ON ANYONE'S 
PATENTS, and can be handled without risk of "dead stock." 

ALABASTINE stands for the "safety track" to the successful merchant and to the one as well whose lights have not always be«n 
turned toward the brightest side. ALABASTINE is in demand; is superior to anything else for walls, ar.d is extensively advertised. 

Order early, with spring dating, direct or from jobber. 



THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, 



Paris, Ont. 



Choosing Cylinder Locks 

2. An Eye to Quality. 

What is quality ? What have you learned to regard it as from the cylinder locks you carry ? — 
something stated on paper or claimed by salesmen, or something in the locks ? 

Mr. Hardwareman, if you want to learn about Quality, order 

GURNEY CYLINDER LOCKS 

and examine them, try them. The sign will be unmistakable — perfect material, perfect 
execution. 

What you will see in Gurney Cylinder Locks is what builders call quality and 
what we know to be quality. 

Quality is often hard to find in some locks, but secure Gurney Cylinder Locks 
and you. have found Quality. 

The "Key" to Gurney Cylinder Locks is Catalogue No. 7 and Supple- 
ments. No hardware dealer can afford to be without them. And they are 
obtainable free. 

THE GURNEY, TILDEN CO., LIMITED 



BRANCHES: 
WINNIPEG— Tilden, Gurney & Co., Limited 
VANCOUVER— The Gurney, Tilden Co., Limited 



HAMILTON AGENCY: 

Montreal, P. Q., Charles Nlcoll, 

85 St. Peter St. 



49 



Hardware and Metal 



PLVMBINO AND STEAMF1TTIN0 



January 6, 1906 




J5$£mz^#^^ 



MikinrArTiioc oe r\ c ^"^ 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



3C7rceuu<n Lfria7rux<-s$a/% ■ t -^^ ^iM(Z^r^<^^z^c^^^5 l ^^??c' 



MADE IN CANADA." 



Write us at once if you want to secure- 



A CATALOGUE 

of the latest designs of Porcelain Enamelled Bath Tubs, 
Sinks, Urinals, Latrines, Etc. 

Now ready for distribution and will be mailed on application. 

THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELLED WARE IN CANADA 



Head Office and Factory : 

Port Hope, Out. 



Sales Office: 

50 Colborne St., Toronto. 




"The "Heintz." 
The Heintz Steam Trap is a steam 
saver. A Thermostatic Trap allow- 
ing only the condensation to drain 
off. Proper installation insures sav- 
ing of 10 per cent, to 25 per cent, in 
fuel. 



THE JAMES MORRISON RRASS MFG. GO., Limited 

89-97 West Adelaide St., TORONTO 



mNEi 



50 



January 6, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 




PLAIN TALKS ON PLUMBING, HEATING AND VENTILATION 

A Series of Practical Articles Written in Plain Terms, Devoid of Technical 

Phrases, Algebraical Signs, etc., so as to be Easily Understood 

by all Interested in these Subjects. 

By M. J. Quinn, Mechanical Superintendent for the Ontario Government. 
[Registered in accordance with the Copyright Act] 

Article XXIV. 



It is becoming more and more evident 
to the great mass of the people, as time 
goes by. that the better ventilated the 
building, the belter is the health of its 
inmates likely to he. and for that rea- 
son greater and more intelligent at- 
tempts are being made to provide in 
some way for the loss of oxygen and ex- 
cess of carbonic gas in the atmosphere 
breathed by either human beings or 
beasts, and, of course, the only way to 
keep the air in a room pure is to change 
it often enough to prevent its pollution 
below a given point. 

Aii- is rendered unfit for usage by a 
great variety of causes, but, in the ma- 
jority of cases, respiration is by far the 
the most conspicuous. 

Each adult "erson breaths about 20 
times every minute, and inhales about 
30 cubic inches of air at each breath. 
The air on entering the lungs, contains 
a.bont 70 per cent., by volume, of nitro- 
gen, and 20.S per cent, of oxygen, with 
a very small fraction of carbonic acid. 
The latter, however, when it is exnired, 
has increased to about 4.3 per cent, of 
the total volume, while the oxygen, 
which is the life sustaining fluid, has 
been reduced to 15.4 per cent., or a loss 
of nearly 26 per cent. It will at once, 
then, become evident that unless some 
provision is made for renewing the at- 
mosphere, or suplying fresh oxygen and 
removing the carbonic acid, that, far 
from supplying new energy to those liv- 
ing in and breathing the air, it will soon 
become positively injurious. 

Science lias been able to demonstrate 
to us to a fairly positive degree, what 
the requirements of the human race are 
in the matter of ventilation, and it lias 
been shown that under varying condi- 
tions, more or less oxygen is reouired 
and consumed. For instance, a child 
d.oes not consume as much as an adult, 
and either child or adult consumes less 
while asleen than awake, and more while 
sick than 1 well: so that, in arranging ven- 
tilation of any apartment or building, re- 
gard for the use for which that particu- 
lar apartment or building is intended 
must be had, but roughly speaking it 
will be found safe to provide 2,50(1 to 
3.000 cubic feet of fresh air per hour 
for each child, and 3,000 to 3,500 cubic 
feet per hour for each adult. 

Where it is intended to veh-tilate I 

scl 1 or other public building where a 

definite amount of air should lie supplie I 



at all times, regardless of weather con- 
ditions, the only plant that can be if' 
pended upon to do (lie work is what is 
known as the mechanical, or blast sys- 
tem, which will be discussed in a later 
article, and which, because of the cer- 
lainty with which it works, and the good 
results that are obtained from it, is 



ed the "indirect," and "direct indirect" 
systems, respectively. 

In Fig. 1 is shown a sketch of the 
indirect system of heating and ventilat- 
ing as it is applied to one room, ami «f 
course the same principle would apply 
to any number of rooms. 

If will be noticed thai just under the 
floor of the upper room, which represents 
the lirsf floor of the house — the lower 
apartment being the basement— is placed 
a radiator, containing the proper num- 
bei of loops of what is known as "in- 
direct" radiation, and that this radiator 
is enclosed in a case, which may be of 
wood, lined with bright tinner] iron or 




rapidly coming into very general use. 

It is the purpose of the writer to deal 
in this and the succeeding article, only 
with the methods used to ventilate pri- 
vate houses, or small buildings, where 
comparatively little ventilation is re- 
quired, or where there is no motive pow- 
er for a mechanical svstem, and these 
methods are two in number, and are call- 

51 



of a double jacket of galvanized iron, 
having, say, a one-inch space between 
the inner and outer case, but in either 
case a lining of bright tin is advisable 
because, as is well known, the bright 
surface prevents to a very great extent 
the radiation of the heat in the base- 
ment, and the sides and bottom of this 
case are so arranged as to permit of 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTINQ 



January 6, 1906 



their being easily taken apart to make 
repairs, or for any other purpose. 

It is usual to bang the beater so that 
there will he a space of at least eight 
<>r ten inches between it ami the ceil- 
ing, and from this Bpace is run a duct 
litable size which terminates in an 
opening into the room to he ventilated at 
a point seven or eight feet above the 
floor. 

In Fig. 2 is shown a more detailed 

drawing of the "indirect" heater, show- 
ing the various connections, etc, which 
go to make it complete. 

It will be noted that it is hung from 
thf timbers overhead by ordinary pipe 
hangers, usually made of 3-8 inch pipe, 
and banger plates, and that the vertical 
pieces of the hangers are placed close 
to the sides of the heater, and that the 
sides and ends of the easing are also 
to the heater. 



diaphram is to properly distribute over 
tin under surface of the heater the Large 
volume of incoming fresh air from 
the duct entering the bottom of the cas- 
ing and SO pi event the undue chilling 
of one portion of the radiator, and at 
the same time compel every pari of it 
to do its share of the work. 

Note.— This phase of the subject, ven- 
tilation, cannot properly he concluded in 
one article and will he continued in our 



ANCIENT SEWERAGE SYSTEMS. 

It is generally supposed that it is only 
modern man who has perfected a system 
of drainage and sewerage to carry from 
his house and city the overflowing rain 
water and the filth and garbage which 
accumulate. In the excavation of Bis- 
mya, the ancient Sumerian or pre-Baby- 




I'nder the radiator, ami between it and 
the bottom of the casing, is a space equal 
to that left above the heater, viz., eight 
or ten inches, and in the centre of this 
space, and extending from side to side, 
and from end to end, is a dianhram of 
either wood or galvanized iron, prefer- 
ably the latter, well perforated with 3-4 
inch or 1 inch holes. 

From the bottom of the space below 
the diaphram is taken a sheet iron pipe 
connection; which opens through the 
outer wall id' tin- building directly into 
the fresh air. This duct should he fitted 
with a close fitting slide damper, and. 
unless it is of considerable length, need 
not have a capacity greater than SO per 
cent, of that of the duct from the top of 
the heater. 

As will be obvious, the office of the 



Ionian city which flourished 4,500 years 
ago, writes Edgar J. Banks in the Scien- 
tific American, a remarkable system of 
drainage, perfectly adapted to the allu- 
vial plain of the Mesopotamian desert, 
has been discovered. 

Babylonia is perfectly level. From 
Bagdad to the Persian Gulf there is not 
the slightest elevation, save for the arti- 
ficial mounds or an occasional changing 
sand drift. In most places there is a 
crust of hard clay upon the surface, 
baked by the hot sun of Summer time, 
so hard that it resembles stone. Parts 
of the desert are perfect for bicycle rid- 
ing. Beneath the crust, which at Bismya 
i- seldom more than four feet in thick- 
ness and in places entirely lacking, is 
Loose, caving sand, reaching to an un- 
known depth. 

62 



Drainage in such a count rv. without 
sloping hills or streams of running 
water, might tax the ingenuity of the 
modern builder. In constructing a house 
the ancient Sumerian of more than 6,000 
years ago lirst dug a hole into the sand 
to a considerable depth. At Bismya sev- 
eral instances were found where the 
shaft had reached the depth id' fourteen 
meters beneath the foundation of the 
house. 

From the bottom he built up a vertical 
drain of large, cylindrical terra cotta 
sections, each of which is provided with 
grooved flanges to receive the one above. 
The sections of one drain were forty- 
eight centimeters in diameter and sixty 
in height; others were larger and much 
shorter; the thickness of the wall was 
2.7 centimeters. The tiles were punc- 
tured at intervals with small holes about 
two centimeters in diameter. The sec- 
tion at the top of the drain was semi- 
spherical, fitting over it like a cap, and 
provided with an opening to receive the 
water from above. Sand and potsherds 
were then filled in about the drain, and 
it was ready for use. The water, pour- 
ing into it, was rapidly absorbed by the 
sand at the bottom, and if there it be- 
came clogged, the water escaped through 
the holes in the sides of the tiles. 

The temple of Bismya was provided 
with several such drains. One palace 
was discovered with four: a large bath, 
resembling a modern Turkish bath, and 
provided with a bitumen floor, sloping 
to one corner, emptied its waste water 
into one. 

In clearing out the drains, a few of 
them, whose openings had been exposed, 
were filled with the drifting sand; others 
were half full of the filth of long past 
ages ; in one at the temple we removed 
dozens of shallow terra cotta drinking 
cups, not unlike a large saucer in shape 
and size. Evidently it received the waste 
water of a drinking fountain, and the 
cups had accidentallv dropped within. 

In the Bismya temple platform, con- 
structed about 2,750 B.C., we uncovered 
a horizontal drain of tiles, each of which 
was about a meter lono- and fifteen cen- 
timeters in diameter, and not unlike in 
shape those at present employed. It 
conducted the rain water from the plat- 
form to one of the vertical drains. One 
tile was so well constructed that for a 
long time it served as a chimney for our 
house, until my Turkish overseer sug- 
gested that, its dark smoked end pro- 
ject from the battlements of the house 
to convince the Arabs that we were well 
fortified; thus it served as a gun until 
the close of the excavations. 

In other parts of the temple more ele- 
mentary drains were employed to carry 
off the surface water from the slightly 
inclined platform. It consisted simply 
of a groove constructed of bricks or ar- 
ranged by omitting the bricks in the 
floor; frequently the groove was contin- 
ued down over the vertical ed f ' the 

platform. 

The Babylonians of a later period, 
who buried, instead of cremating their 
dead, carefully provided their cemeteries 
with drains. The eraVes were small 



January 6, 1906 



PLUMBING AND STEAMF1TTING 



Hardware and Metal 



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53 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMF1TTINQ 



January 6, 1906 



house-shaned structures entirely or part- 
ly above (•round, and whenever they 
were found upon the sloping side of a 
mound, they were protected above by a 
breakwater, while along the sides were 
square, open brick drains. The result 
«:i- thai some of the Taves, although 
thousands <>t' years old, and constructed 
of unbaked clav, are Mill in a perfeel 
state of preservation. 

To tlit- student of architecture it may 
bo surprising to learn that the arch, un- 
til recently supposed to have been un- 
known to the ancients, was frequently 
employed by the pre-Babylonians of 
more than 6,000 years ago: Such an 
arch, in a poor Mate of preservation, 
was a few years ago discovered in the 
lowest stratum, beneath the Babylonian 
city id' Nippur. More recently an arched 
drain was found beneath the old citv of 
Fara, which the Germans have excavated 
in Central Babylonia. The citv. although 
one of the earliest known, was built 
upon an earlier ruin, and provided with 
an arched drain constructed of small, 
plano-convex bricks. It measures about 
one meter in height and has an equal 
width. 

While delving among the ruins of the 
oldest cities of the world, we ate thus 
finding that at the time when we sup- 
posed that man was primitive and sav- 
Bge, he provided his home and city with 
"improvements" which we are inclined 
to call modern, but which we are only 
reiuventinsr. 



FRAUD CASES CONCLUDED. 

flic three fraud eases against members 
ot the Toronto and Guelph tfastei 
Plumbers Associations were concluded 
during the week. the result being 25 
committals tor trial for receiving 
"1.0.1 s" mi the three contracts named 
below. Little evidence was taken, Sec- 
retary .Meredith being put into the box 
to identify certain exhibits, and J. E. 
Gray, a former member of the associa- 
tion, turning King's evidence and secur- 
ing his own release by telling of how 
the bonuses were distributed on the jobs 
he was interested in. Those committed 
were as follows : 

George F. McGuire, William .1. Me- 
Guire, Alex. Purdy, William Mansell, 
.lames B. Kit/.simons,' K. J. Allison, 
Watson Mashinter, Henry B. Hogarth, 
Kobt. W. Harrison, Charles Robertson, 
Francis R. Maxwell, Herbert Johnson, 
.lames H. Wilson, George Wallis, Jas. 
Fiddes, J. 10. Gray, George Clapperton 
and Joseph Wright", charged with con- 
spiring to defraud Messrs. Warwick 
Bros. & Rutter of $1,200. 

W. .1. McGuire, George F. McGuire, 
George Clapperton, Joseph Wright, Hen- 
iv Hogarth, Alexander Purdy, William 
Mansell, Watson Mashinter, Fred Arm^ 
strong, David Menzies, Patrick J. Hayes 
and .James H. Wilson, charged with con- 
spiring to defraud the Toronto Bedding 
Company, Limited, of $400. 

M. Stevenson, of Guelph, A. Malcolm, 
of Guelph, George Clapperton, Joseph 
Wright, Alexander Purdy, William Man- 
sell, of Toronto, II. Mahoney and R. 
Mahoney, of Guelph, charged with con- 



spiting tn defraud the Homewood Sani- 
tarium of J800. 

This disposes of all the eases until the 
Assize Court sits later on this month 

Nothing of importance has transpired 
at the trial proceeding in Hamilton, an 
adjournment, having been made fot a 
week on account of the New Year's holi- 
day. 

PLUMBING GOSSIP. 
Fiddes cV Hogarth, Toronto, have sc- 
ented the contract for plumbing and 

healing the new nurses' home on College 
street. Three No. !) Daisy boilers and 
75,0(10 feet, of radiation will be used in 
connection with the heating contract. 

* * * 

A picture post card received by a 
plumbing supply man in Toronto this 
week announced that the sender was 
"detained from business," and pictured 
a man wearing a striped suit behind 
strong stone walls. "Bob" Cluff says 
the picture resembles his double, Fred 
Somerville. 

* . * 

The MacLaren Company, of Glasgow, 
will shortly begin the shipment on the 
contract for four thousand tons of iron 
pipe for a high pressure fire service in 
Toronto. 

* . * 

The hockey team of the James Morri- 
son Brass Manufacturing Company, To- 
ronto, which won the Manufacturers' 
League championship in 1904 and 1905, 
will not re-organize for 1906 owing to 
several of the members of the team be- 
ing absent or unable to participate in 
the game this Winter. 



GwiniUMi 




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January 6, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 



Plumbing Markets 



ONTARIO. 

Office of Hardware and Metaj., 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 5, 1906, 

Solder lias advanced, and half-and-half 
is now quoted at 23c. Some manufac- 
turers have also advanced brass goods, 
Iml the change is not universal yet. 
While there is a feeling- that copper will 
not maintain its present high prices, 
brass is bound to go upward, according 
to present market conditions. 

Business in plumbing' materials is very 
quiet, although heating supplies continue 
to sell readily. Jobbers are still engag- 
ed in stock-taking. 

Lead Pipe— The market is strong with 
a fair trade being done. Our quo- 
tations are as follows: Lead, 7c; lead 
waste pipe, 8c; discount, 20 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Prices con- 
tinue firm with not much business doing. 
We quote as follows: Medium and 
extra heavy pine and fittings, 60 per 
cent.; 7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 per 
cent. 

Iron Pipe — The market is strong and 
a lair trade is reported. We quote as fol- 
lows: -Black. 1-4 inch, $2.09; 3-8, $2.09; 
1-2 inch, $2.45; 3-4 inch, $3.05; 1 inch, 
$4.37; 1 1-4 inch, $5.96; 1 1-2 inch, 
$7.15; 2 inch, $9.54; 2 1-2 inch, $15.00; 3 
inch, $19.35; galvanized, 1-4 inch, $2.91; 
3-8 inch, $2.91; 1-2 inch, $3.27; 3-4 
inch, $4.20; 1 inch, $6.02; 1 1-4 inch, 
$S.22; 1 1-2 inch, $9.86; 2 inch, $13.14; 
2 1-2 inch, $21.45; 3 inch, $28.05. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Demand continues 
satisfactory, with prices unchanged. We 
quote the following prices: Cast iron, 
elbows, tees, crosses, etc., 65 per cent.; 
cast iron plugs and bushings, 65 per 
cent. ; flange unions, 65 per cent. ; nip- 
ples, 75 per cent.; iron cocks, 60 per 
cent. ; Canadian malleable, 35 per cent. ; 
American malleable, 25 per cent.; malle- 
able unions, 65 per cent.; malleable bush- 
ings and plugs, 60 per cent.; C. I. ceil- 
ing plates, plain or N. P., 70 per cent. ; 
C. I. floor, 80 per cent.; bookplates, 60 
per cent.; expansion plates, 65 per cent.; 
headers or branch tees, 65 per cent.; ring 
hangers, b|lack or galvanized, 60 per 
cent., American list. 

Galvanized Iron Range Boilers— Prices 
continue unchanged with trade quite ac- 
tive. Our quotations are as 
follows: 12 gallon capacity, standard, 
$4.50: extra heavy, $6.50; 18 gallon, 
standard, $4.75; extra heavy, $6.75; 24 
gallons, standard, $4.75; extra heavy. 
$6.75; 30 gallon, standard, $4.75; extra 
heavy, $7.50; 35 gallon, standard, $5.75; 
extra heavy, $8.50; 40 gallon, standard, 
$6.75; 40 'gallon, extra heavy, $9.50; 
B2 gallon, $11.00; extra heavy, .+14: 
66 gallon, standard, $18; extra heavy, 
$20; 82 gallon, standard, $21; extra 



heavy, $24; 100 gallon, standard, $29: 
extra heavy, $34; 120 gallon, standard, 
$34; extra heavy, $40; 144 gallon, stan- 
dard, $47; extra heavy, $55. The dis- 
count on copper and range boilers con- 
tinues at 15 per cent. 

Solder — An advance has been made in 
half-and-half, and prices are firm. We 
now quote: Bar solder, half-and-half, 
guaranteed, 23c, and wiping at 20c. 

Enameled Ware — Demand for Cana- 
dian waie has been enormous during the 
past season and there is still a heavy 
call for supplies to complete jobs in 
hand. We quote as follows: Baths, 
rolled rim, 5 feet, 2 1-2 inch rim, first 
quality, $18.65; special, $16.65; 3 inch 
rim, first quality, $19.15 ; special, $18.15 ; 
5 1-2 feet, 2 1-2 inch rim, first quality, 
$20.15 ; special, $18.15 ; 3 inch rim, first 
quality, $21.65; special, $19.65. Lava- 
tories, discounts, first quality, 30 to 30 
and 5 per cent.; special, 30 and 10 to 40 
per cent. Sinks, 18 x 30 inch, flat rim, 
first quality, $2.55: special, $2.40. 

QUEBEC. 

office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 MoGilJ Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 5, 1906. 

Plumbing circles are showing little ac- 
tivity, owing to the many holidays of 
late. There are still a number of eon- 
tracts of fair size, unfinished, and, as 
.Montreal building operations will be on 
a large scale during 1906, the prospects 
are for a fine year's business. 

No changes have occurred in prices 
current, thoueh the tone throughout re- 
mains very firm. 

Range Boilers— The turnover is all 
that can be expected at this time of year. 
Our prices remain as follows : 
Iron clad, 30 gallon, $6.00, and 40 gal- 
lon, $7.50 net; copper, 30 gallon, $22.00; 
35 gallon, $24,00; 40 gallon, $28. The 
discount on copper boilers is 15 per cent. 

Lead Pipe— The advance which we 
noted last week has been well held, the 
strength of the primary market practi- 
cally insuring a high tone in this article, 
for some time to come. Discounts are 20 
per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto 
St. John, N.B., and Halifax; f.o.b. Lon- 
don, 15c. per hundred lbs. extra; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, 10c per hundred lbs. extra. 

Iron Pipe Fittings — Orders received 
during the week have been well looked 
alter. Our pi ices are: Discounts 
on all sizes of nipples up to (> inch, 67 
1-2 to 70 per cent. 

Iron Pipe — Trade continues to be of 
satisfactory volume. We quote: Standard 
pipe in lots of 100 feet, regular lengths, 
1-4 inch, $5.50 3-8 inch, $5.50; 1-2 inch. 
$8.50; 3-4 inch, $11.50; 1 inch, $16.50; 
1 1-4 inches, $22.50; 1 1-2 inches, 
$27.00; 2 inches, $36.00; discounts on 

56 



black pipe, 1-4 inch, 62 per cent. ; 3-8 
inch, 62 per cent.: 1-2 inch, 71 1-2 per 
cent.; 3-4 inch, and upwards, 73 1-2 pet- 
cent. Discounts on galvanized pipe: 1-4 
inch, 47 per cent.; 3-8 inch, 47 per 
cent.; 1-2 inch, 61 1-2 per cent.; 3-4 
inch and upwards, 63 1-2 per cent. Ex- 
tra heavy pipe of 100 feet lots are 
quoted as follows: 1-2 inch, $12.00; 
3-4 inch, $15.00; 1 inch, $22.00; 1 1-4 
inch, $30.00; 1 1-2 inch, $36.00; 2 
inch, $50.00. The disiount for black- 
pipe is: 71 per cent., and for galvanized 
61 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Supply houses 
are well pleased with the trade that is 
being done. We still quote: Standard 
'soil pipe, 50 per cent, off list. Standard 
fittings, 50 and 10 per cent, off list; 
medium and extra heavy soil pipe, 60 
per cent. off. Fittings, 60 per cent off. 

Solder — We continue to quote the 
following prices: Bar solder, half-and- 
half, guaranteed, 22c; No. 2 (wiping 
solder), 18c 

$5,000 FINE NOT YET PAID. 

A perplexing question has presented it- 
self in relation to the $5,000 fine im- 
posed by Justice Clute on the Central 
Supply Association. The association lias 
no assets and the members of the cor- 
poration decline to come to its support. 
They have, however, decided to take the 
case to the highest courts if necessary 
to escape paying the line and notice of 
appeal has been served. The appeal will 
be threshed out at the next sitting of 
the Court of Appeal, which commences 
in April. 

In the meantime, however, an interest- 
ing point arises. It is claimed by the 
counsel for the association that it is not 
necessary for them to pay the fine be- 
fore the appeal is started. "In fact," 
said the counsel, "paying the fine would 
be an acceptance of the verdict." The 
master plumbers virtually intimated 
that they intended to allow the verdict 
to stand when they paid their fine. 

Deputy Attorney-General CartWright 
said that in criminal proceedings it was 
customary to pay the fine and then ap- 
peal. In civil cases the amount of the 
judgment is not levied until the appeal 
is disposed of. 

"How can you levy a fine on an asso- 
ciation which has no assets '.'" asked 
Crown Attorney Drayton in reply to a 
question asking how the fine was to be 
collected. 



"TALKING OF ANTS." 
The American truth-teller was in 
form. "Talking of ants," he said, 
"we've got 'em as big as crabs out 
west. I guess I've seen 'em fight with 
long thorns, which they used as lances, 
charging each other like savages." 
"They don't compare to the ants I saw 
in the east," said an inoffensive individ- 
ual near by. "The natives have trained 
I hem as beasts of burden. One of 'em 
could trail a ton load for miles with 
ease. They worked willinglv. but occa- 
sionally they turned on their attendants 
and killed them." But this was draw- 
ing the long-bow a little too far. "1 
say, old chap," said a shocked voice 
from the corner, "what sort of ants 
were they ?" "Eleph-ants," said the 
quiet man. 



Hardware and Metal 



PLVMBISO AND STEAMFITTINQ 



January 6, 1906 




Christmas Business over, now for 
stock-taking. Did it ever occur to 
you the convenience it is in having 

LOOSE LEAF 

STOCK-TAKINC 

SHEETS? 

We carry them in stock and can 
supply you with any quantity. 

They can be neatly filed away in 
one of our binders, thus having them 
always easy of access. 

Write us to-day. 



TheRollaL CrainCo. 



LIMITED 



OTTAWA, Canada 



TORONTO OFFICE 
MONTREAL OFFICE 
8T. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 
VANOOUVER, B.C. 



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74 Alliance Bldg. 
Schofield Bros. 

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MacLean Publishing 
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MERRELL COMBINED HAND 
AND POWER MACHINES 




These machines are our portable hand 
machines, mounted on base and driven by com- 
pound gears with cone pulley, and are so ar- 
ranged that either hand or power can be used at 
will, or the machine can be readily taken from its 
base and used as a portable hand machine. The 
chasers are set by graduation to any size de- 
sired, are released while the machine is in 
motion, opened to permit of pipe being cut off, 
and closed instantly and positively, one set being 
used to thread several sizes of pipe. They can 
be sharpened by grinding and are readily re- 
placed by chasers cutting any style or pitch of 
thread, either right or left. Four sizes Nos. 52^, 
63^, 0^, 11^. 

Would you like our Catalog/ ? 



,HE CANADIAN FAIRBANKS GO. 

Sole Agents for Canada Llmi,ed 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEC, VANCOUVER 



GUAEANTEED 

5 5 5 



Y 
E 
A 
R 

S 




The Best Door Closer Is . . . 
NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages over the ordinary 
spring, and has twice the wear. In use through- 
out Great Britain and the Colonies Gives perfect 

satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 

Hospital 8t., - - BIRMINGHAM 



5 5 5 

GUARANTEED 



At the Same Price 

Isn't it Best to use the Kind that are 

GUARANTEED 



5YEARS 5 YEARS 5 



CLAUBER, ™ET 



56 



THE ARMSTRONG MFG. CO. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



January 6, 1906 



PLUMBING AND STEAMPITTINQ 



Hardware and Metal 



Towel 



RhrnTgNftg ^: 



>k No Jt^L V** 

f — ' 



*J 



r m:>. 




Bars 



Soap Dishes 
Sponge Baskets 
Paper Fixtures 



Catalog " B " shows the full line of 

BATH ROOM FIXTURES 

made by 

The Carriage Mountings Co., Limited, - Toronto 



Write for it to-day. 



Tumbler Holders 
Robe Hooks 
Bath Sprays, Etc. 



Brass and Copper Pipe 

Our Stock comprises 

BRASS : /^-in. to 3-in. in Iron Pipe sizes 
COPPER: J* -in, to2-in. " 
All orders shipped promptly. Correspondence solicited 

WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S. 



METALS 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



DEALERS IN 



Solder, 
Babbitt, 
Lead Pipe, 
Tin Pipe, 
Fuse Wire, 
Electrical Zincs. 



Pig Lead, 

Antimony, 
Copper, 
Pig Tin, 

Aluminum, 
Bismuth. 



WRITE US YOUR REQUIREMENTS 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY 

WILLIAM STREET, - TORONTO 

57 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITT1NG 



January 6, 1906 



3 ^ ^VWV^^^^**^^V^^V^^VWW^* 



IMPROVED 



Daisy Hoi Water Boilers 




Simplest in 
Construction. 

Economical, 
Efficient. 

Sales exceed 
all others. 

Every Boiler 
Guaranteed. 



We also carry large stocks of 
Iron Pipe, Cast and Malleable 
Fittings, Brass Goods, etc., 
insuring prompt shipments. 

send us your rush orders 
and note results. 



R. J. CLUFF & CO. 

50 and 52 Lombard Street, Toronto. 

ONTARIO AGENTS FOR 

WARDEN KING & SON, MONTREAL 




DIAMOND -BRAND-FITTINGS 

Manufactured and Guaranteed by 

Thl Oshawa Steam «< Gas Fittings Go. 

Limited 

Stocked by all Leading Wholesale Houses. 
SPECIALTIES 

Hot Air Furnaces. Sash Weights and Washers. 

Fine Grey Iron Castings. 

OS HA WA, - CANADA 




" —--' 



Now's the time to 
commence 

and get ready a new crop of good 
resolutions for the New Year. 

First and Foremost 

among these should be a determination 
to make the very best of opportunities 
and make up for past neglect of the 
same. 

If you have not as yet made 
the acquaintance of 



THE 



CLOSET 



Start the New Year well by 
ordering now. 

THIS WILL PLACE YOU IN POSITION TO 
MAKE 1900 A RECORD BREAKER 



Had you done this a year ago your satis- 
faction now would be intense. But the past 
is unalterable; it remains for you to profit by 
its lesson and improve the future. 



THE ItaWlDCO. 



C. H. MUCKENHIRN 

PRESIDENT 



Salem, NJ. 



58 



January 6, 1906 



PLUMBING AND STEAMF1TTINQ 



Hardware and Metai 



MUEL1ER WATER PRESSURE REGULATORS 

REGULAR PATTERN. 




C-100. 



Many of your friends endure the annoyance that 
fire pressure causes at faucets only because they know 
of no way to overcome it, and you only need to tell them 
of a good pressure controlling device in order to effect 
quite a number of profitable sales. 

Mueller Domestic Pressure Regulators restrict fire 
pressure to the mains and allow a full, gentle stream 
at the faucets, free from annoyances. When you ex- 
plain their advantages to your friends they will 
thoroughly appreciate them, and in most instances 
will have you equip their service with them. 

Mueller Pressure Regulators for domestic use are made in two pat- 
terns, regular and low reducing. The former will regulate to a medium 
low pressure only, while the latfer will regulate to as low as zero if desired. 
The regulator illustrated is the low reducing pattern. 

Each Regulator bears the Mueller trade mark and is unconditionally 
guaranteed. 

We also make a full line of ground key, compression and fuller work 
for plumbers' use. Catalogs upon application. 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO. 



Decatur, III., U.S.A. 



New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 



Phoiw No. 

Parkdale 1809 



Pott Off lea and Ttlegraph Addnss 

Swansea 



The Dominion Sewer Pipe Co., Limited 

Swansea, Toronto, Ont. 

We have just completed one of the finest sewer pipe fac- 
tories in America equipped with the latest machinery, and 
are now producing very superior 

Up 

VITRIFIED SALT GLAZED 

SEWER PIPES 

in sizes from 4 inches to 24 inches. Price lists and discounts 
on application 

The Dominion Sewer Pipe Co., Limited 

Works : Swansea, Toronto, Ont. 




That New Valve 



Jut Book No 4y 

Page No,..._..jyL. 




FAIRBANKS 
"SHIRLEY" PATENT 

GATE VALVE 



IF All wearing- parts fully brass mounted. 

IF The Discs are of iron with brass faces. 

f Gates move absolutely without - friction opposite 
ports, and are closed squarely against them by the 
internal mechanism. 



The "Shirley" is the best regular valve for water 
or low pressure steam on the market to-day. 



A Good Line for Supply Man to Carry 

Send tor Circulars 

The CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., Limited 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 



59 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



A. PERMANENT 

ind Handsome Roof. 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Will bring you profitable trade and satisfied customers. Comes in rolls ready to 
lay. all roa.ly covered with gravel. Requires no experience to lay, and lasts 
(or years without farther attention. 

A. C. JENKING & CO, Sole Agents, 
Room 210 Coristlne Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sole agents being appointed in each district. Write to-day. 



MACHINE MADE 

TEA KETTLE SPOUTS 

In -elf colour or Bright Tinned. Perfect shape and quality. Made in 5 sizes- 
Write for samples and quotation and state quantity required. ACENT8 WANTED. 

ERNEST STEVENS, STOUR WORKS, 

CRADLEY HEATH, ENGLAND 




c4"M). 




15,400,000 STEEL BALLS 

The largest order ever placed for Steel Balls used for the manufacture 
of Casters. « 

ACME CASTERS 

They are ball bearing and roll easily. Write for particulars. 



Canadian Sample Room : 

215 Coristine Bldg., Montrbal. 

A. C. JENKING, Canadian Mgr. 



SMITH £> nEMENWAV CO., 

296 Broadway, Dept. 6fi2, New York City 



HARDENED AND TEMPERED 



SPRINGS 

Send Specifications to m i — ANY SHAPE. 

The WALLACE BARNES CO., BRISTOL, Conn. 



NEW CATALOG JUST ISSUED. 



The most light for the least money 

C. G. E. INCANDESCENT LAMPS 

LONG LIFE EFFICIENCY RELIABILITY 

Write for prices and quantity discounts. 

CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices: Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Rossland 



A GREATER NUMBER OF SALES 

will be yours if you carry 



METALLIC ASH-SIFTERS 

instead of wooden sifter>. 

METALLIC ASH SIFTERS sell themselves. Any reasonable man can see that wood will not 
last as long as sheet iron, nor wire as long as metal lath. 

So vou see, no person would have hesitation about buying a METALLIC ASH-SIFTER. But 
a wooden sifter!— MANY PERSONS WOULDN'T CONSIDER IT. 

If you would like to know more about the METALLIC ASH-SIFTER write for our Illustrated 
Circular. 

C. M. CUTTS & CO., sole Makers, Toronto Junction, Ont. 

60 



Sort Up Your Stove and Heating Stock. 

TRY OUR UNEQUALLED 

STANDARD OAK 

FOR A HEATER. 

SOVEREIGN 

AS A COOKING RANGE. 
Finest Fuel Having Furnaces in Canada 
Save your coal and wood. Building stoves 
is a science we have mastered. All our lines 
are money makers. 

Send direct or ask your nearest jobber. 

OTTAWA FURNACE AND FOUNDRY GO. 

Lim\ e d 

OTTAWA, ONTARIO 



A WORD TO PLUMBERS 



Our Pipe Die reduces the labor in 
threading pipes at least one half. Try 
it, it will cost you nothing to try it. We 
secure you against possible loss by our 
offer to return your money on return 
of the die within thirty days, if it is 
not satisfactory. It is surely worth a 
trial on these conditions. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 




Kerr's " Copper - Alloy" Disc 
GLOBE VALVES 

are superior to any other disc valves 
on the market for high steam. 
This is a very superior valve, at a 
moderate price. 



The KERR ENGINE CO., 

Manufacturers Limited 

WALKERVILLE, ONT., CANADA 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






, SHEET BRASS X COLD ROLLED COPPER 

We are now fully equipped and can fill all orders for these metals. 
Send us specifications of your requirements. Write for our Discount Sheet. 



CANADA BRASS ROLLING MILLS, 

X LIMITED i 

X mills: NEW TORONTO, CAN. Head Office: 98 King St. W., TORONTO I 

.:..:..:..:..:..:.*:..:..:~:~x**><k«**<«<^ 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing- Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



BRONZE POWDER AND LIQUID 

used Dv every steam-fitter. Ask your supply houses 
for our goods for best results. Or, if they have not 
got them, write direct to 

R. E. THORNE 



768 Craig Street 
MONTREAL 



29 Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



Subscribe to the 

OIL AND COLOORMll'S JOURNAL 

for news of the British Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 

Subscription for Canada, $2.00 per year from date, 
post free. Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD & CO. 

19 LUDGATE HILL LONDON. ENO. 



,-«..•*.»........*•.«•..•-••- 



? Are you interested in any of the j 

? lines that are advertised ? i 

j A Post Card will bring you price f 

i list and full information. 

• Don't forget to mention Hard- s 

| ware and Metal. I 

? k 
*..,..»................ .».....«..............«........«.............. v 



Mantels, 
Grates, 
Tile, etc. 

A Nice Mantel 
is a fine piece 
of Furniture. 



Batty Stove and Hardware Co. 

182 Adelaide Street West 




MAKE FRIENDS AS WELL AS MONEY 

It is good business to make your customers your friends. Every time 
you instal the 

OXFORD HEATINC SYSTEM 

you make friends as well as money. 
The Oxtord System is economically and 
scientifically perfect. When you're 
finished with the job, you are finished. 
You have the satisfaction of knowing 
that every detail is perfect, that the 
system will give the highest degree of 
comfort with the lowest possible ex- 
penditure, and that your customer 
must say many good words for you. 

As a practical man you know that 
the Oxford ("B" series) Boiler is im- 
mensely superior to all others. When 
you are recommending the Oxford 
System explain the improved fire-pot 
construction of this boiler, the over- 
hanging upper walls, the bell-shaped 
flues, the permanent metal-to-metal 
connections by which our Oxford Steel 
Push Nipples do away with the use of 
all gaskets and washers and the many 
other special features which go to make 
this Boiler the best and most powerful 
heating apparatus in existence. Ex- 
plain these features and you are bound 
to get your share of business. 

Oxford Hot Water and Steam Radiators 

used with Oxford Boilers mean no trouble, no leaks, plenty of comfort, 
satisfaction and economy with beauty. 

Write for the Gurney Book of Steam and Hot Water Heating Apparatus. 

"\X, r E also manufacture Cast Iron Stoves and Ranges, Steel Plate 
_ Ranges. Gas Stoves, Ranges and Heaters, Hotel Ranges. 
Warm Air Furnaces and all kinds of Cooking and Heating Appar- 
atus, Plumbers' Supplies. 




The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

The Curney-Massey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. 13;1 

The Curney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta. 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, 1906 



It's Amazing 

what you can do if you will but make a start. Hardware dealers in great number are selling "Cyclone" 
and "Joliette" Brands of Sheathing and profiting thereby. Why not you ? 
There is scarcely a dealer now who doesn't carry a stock of 

"BLACK DIAMOND" 



WRAPPING PAPER 
BUILDING PAPER 



♦ 



TARRED FELTS 
READY ROOFING 



WHEN WILL YOU SEND IN YOUR FIRST ORDER ? 



8a flcGILL STREET 



ALEX. HcARTHUR & CO., Limited, MONTREAL 



F. J. C. COX, Winnipeg, Sole Agent for Northwest Provinces. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. 5, 1906. 
These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $39 00 840 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

IC.14 x 20 base $6 50 

IX 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX, 14x20base 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

10, 14x20 base 6 50 

IX, 14x20 " 8 00 

I XX, 14x20 base 9 50 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

IC, 14x20 base 4 25 

IX " 5 00 

IX X " 5 75 

IXX X " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double 

Coated, Tissued. Per box. 

I C, 14x20 base 5 50 

IX, 14x20 " 6 50 

IXX, 14x20" 7 50 

Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

I C, 14x20 base 4 75 

I X. 14x20 " 5 75 

IXX, 14x20 " 6 75 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., 14x20 base 3 75 

I.e., special sizes, base 4 00 

20x28 8 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
De*n or J. G. Grade — 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheet* .... 7 CO 

IX., Terne Tin 8 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet hxs. 1 

" 14x60, " > .... 7 00 

" 14x65, " J 

Tinned Sheets. 

2x30 up to 24 gauge 7 50 

'" 26 " 7 50 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 1 974 2 00 

Forged iron " 2 224 2 43 

Refined " " 2 37J 2 40 

Horseshoe iron " 2 374 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1} to 3 in. base 2 75 

Sleigh shoe steel " fi 174 2 20 

Tire steel 2 27$ 2 30 

Best sheet steel 12 

B. K. Morton & Co.— 

"Alpha" high speed 65 

annealed 70 

'M" Self-hardening 50 

"J 'quality, best warranted 18 

"I " warranted 14 

"C" " 09 

Jonas k Colver's tool steel 10 20 

"Novo" 65 

" annealed 65 

Chas. Leonard 08 09 

CrucibKSteelCo.— 

" Rex high speed steel. . 65 75 

" Self-hardening 45 50 

Crucible Special 16 

" Silver steel C 12 

Black Diamond .... 08 09 
Thos Jowett tSons B.P.L. 

tool steel annealed 101 

Self-hardi-runK 45 

Rapid self-hardening 75 



Sanderson's Crucible steel 08 09 

" • Superior " 12 13 

BABBIT METAL. 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

MetaUic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

Canada Smelting Co., Limited. 

Hard Genuine Babbit 40 

Standard Anti-Friction Babbit 30 

Special Babbit 25 

Car Box Babbit 20 

Extra " 15 

No. 1 " 012 

No. 2 "• 007 

No. 3 " 054 

Standard Phosphor Tin 40 

On large orders special discounts given. 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

14 gauge 2 55 

16 gauge 2 40 2 30 

18 " 2 35 2 35 

20 to 24 gauge 2 30 2 50 

26 ' 2 30 2 70 

28 " 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 

Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 2 60 

Allbright " 3 85 

Galvanized Canada Plate?,52 sheets 4 10 

Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 

Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown. 

16 to 20 gauge 3 25 s 

22 to 24 gauge 3 50 3 75 

26 " .. 3 75 4 00 

28 " . . 4 00 4 25 

Apollo. 

103 oz. (American gauge) 4 15 

28 gauge 4 00 

26 " 3 85 

24 " ! 3 75 

Comet Bell. Queen's Head. 

16 to 20 gauge 3 25 

22 to 24 gauge 3 50 3 75 

26 " 3 75 4 00 

28 " 4 00 4 25 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 



Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. [count 40 p.o. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 



CHAIN 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb 

5-16 
i 

7-16 



7 00 10 00 
6 60 
4 45 
3 85 
3 70 
3 55 

5-16 " 3 45 

3 35 
3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 



Casting, car lots. 



COPPER. 

Ingot. 



Per 100 lb. 
. . . . 20 50 



Bare. 



Cut lengths, round, J to J in 26 00 

round and square, 

Cut lto2 inches.... 25 00 26 00 

Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 ..., 25 00 

Plain, 14 oz 26 00 

Tinned copper sheet 27 00 

Planished 34 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 25 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 23 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned \ «k_™__ * „« \„i 

g n V 35 per cent, off list. 

BRASS. 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 23$ 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 7 25 7 50 

Domestic " " 7 00 7 25 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 8 00 8 00 

Part casks 8 25 8 25 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 4 65 

Bar, " " 4 80 

Sheets, 24 lb. sq. ft., by roll 05} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 054 

Note.— Cut sheets 4c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note. — Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-f i lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 
Cookson's per lb 15 00 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per '100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Net 
list. Prices are f. o. b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 2 p.c. for cash in thirty days. 



PLUMBING GOODS 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Ideal Enameled. 

Plate EI, Fittings extra 1st quality Special 

4 and 44 ft. 3 in. rolled rim. .$19 15 17 15 

5 feet " ..20 15 18 15 
5J " " .. 21 65 19 65 

6 " " .. 24 40 22 40 
Plate E II 

5 feet 24 in. " ..18 65 16 65 

54 " 2J " " .. 20 15 18 15 

LAVATORIES. 

1st quality. Special. 

Plate E 100 to E 103 30 p.c. 30 & 10 p.c. 

" E104WE132 30&5p.c. 40 p.c. 

Sinks 18 x 30 in flat rim, A quality. .. 2 55 
B 2 40 

IRON PIPE. 

Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

i inch 2 75 

I " ' 2 09 

i " 2 09 

| " 2 43 

J " 3 05 

61 



Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

1 inch 4 37 

U " 5 % 

H " 7 15 

„ ,2 " 954 

Galvanized pipe — 

linch 2 91 

I " 1 91 

4 3 27 

5 " 4 20 

1 6 02 

U " 8 23 

1} .... 9 86 

2 " 13 14 

Lead Pipe discount 20 per cent. 

Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 35 per 

cent; American discount 25 per cent. 

Cast Iron Fittings— Standard bushings 65 
per cent ; headers. 65 ; flanged unions 
and lipped, 65 ; malleable bushings, 60 ; 
nipples, up to 6 in., 75 per cent. 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work.dis. 60 p.c 

Cushion work, discount 50 and 10 p.c. 

Fuller work, discount 70 n c. 

12 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 
per cent Within lots of 12 dozen and over 
an extra discount of 10 per cent. 

J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 55 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 
discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's special standard globes and angles, 
discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, discount 55 percent. 

Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 55 p.c. 

Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 
valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Kerr's quick - opening hot - water radiator 
valves, discount 65 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valveB, brass, discount 50 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, I. B. B. M. .discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 

Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 per 
cent. 

Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 70 

per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 1 90 

No. 4 " " 1 75 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 10 

No. 44, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per do/,., $15. 
Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 65 percent 

" " iron " " 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILER8 

CoppeT, 30 gallon " 22 00 

r ' 35 " " 24 00 

" 40 " " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 

GALVANIZED IRON RANGE BOILERS 

Capacity. Standard. Extra heavy 
Gals. 

12 4.50 6.50 

18 4.75 6.75 

■to 4.75 6.75 

30 5.00 7.50 

35 6.00 8.50 

7.00 9.50 

52 11.00 14.00 

66 18.00 20,00 

82 21 00 24.00 

100 29.00 34.00 

120 34.00 40.00 

1*4 55.00 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GLAUSS BRAND EBONY HANDLED RAZORS 



FULLY 
WARRANTED 




Manufactured from finest Clauss 
hammered steel. 

Hardened by our secret process, 

Honed and set ready for use. 

Crocus-finished back, tang 
and shoulder. 

High blue-polished blades. 

CLAUSS SHEAR CO. 



WRITE FOR TRADE DISCOUNT 



TORONTO, 



ONTARIO 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 

Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 

per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

solder. Per lb. 
Montreal Toronto 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 22 23 

Wiping 018 020 

PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 

1-lb. tinB, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 08 

Chrome yellow 15 

Golden ochre 08 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

French permanent green 13 

Signwriters' black 15 

white lead. Per 100 lbs. 

Pure 550 5 80 

No 1 5 10 5 25 

No. 2 f J5 

No. 3 412} 

No. 4 4 05 

Munro'8 Select Flake White o 6b 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 5 50 

Tiger brand, pure 5 75 

Decorators' Special for ex 

terioruse 5 00 

Monarch 5 75 

Decorator's Pure 5 50 

Essex Genuine 5 00 

Sterling Pure 5 75 

Island City Pure 5 75 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 5 50 5 75 

Ramsay's Exterior 5 25 5 50 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per owt .... $5 25 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 5 50 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 5 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 5 50 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 08 

French V. M 06} 07 

Lehigh 06 06* 

Pure 07| 

No. 1 061 

No. 2 C 05} 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 5 50 

No. 1, casks 4 75 

No. 1, kegs 5 00 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

In J, } and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 20 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 00 

Barn (in bbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 40 

}gal 135 

gal 130 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 125 

8anderson Pearcy s pure 1 20 

Standard Co. 'b "New Era." 130 

Francis-Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd 125 

" British Navy deck .... 1 50 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 135 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal 1 20 

" Thistle, " .... 1 00 

" Outside, bbls 55 65 

Island City House Paint 1 25 

" Floor " 1 25 

Sterling House Paint 120 

" Floor " 1 10 

National 1 OS 

Canadian English 
PARIS GREEN. Per lb. 

Petroleum, barrels 15J 15J 

Arsenic, kegs 154 16 

50 and 10J lb. drums 16 16} 

251b.drums 16} 17 

1 lb. paper boxes 17 17} 

llb.tins 18 IS* 

} lb. paper boxes 19 19$ 

lb tins 20} 

Terms 2 per cent, off 30 days or 90 days. 



potty. 

Bulk in bbls 1 50 

Bulk in less quantity 1 80 

Bladders in bbls 165 175 

Bladders in Kegs, boxes or loose 1 90 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

12} lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 1 00 

Hard oil finish 135 150 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

" orange 230 240 

Turpentine, brown japan .... 1 10 1 20 

black japan I 10 1 20 

■' No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each.. 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, $1.20 

size 2, 70c; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 

case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

Canada Paint Co's sun varnish 2 00 



GLUE. 
White, extra 18 


08} 
14 
22 








Strip 


18 


20 




19 


20 




12 


16 



HARDWARE. 



AMMUNITION. 



Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

American $2.00 per 1000. 

C. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, idd 20 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. American 

10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades,25 per cent. discount. 
American 20 per cent, discount. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 3P per cent.: American $1.75 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

fib. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge P 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each — 

11 and smaller gauge I 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

165 



ADZES. 
Discount 22} per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10} 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

APPLE PARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 

Boys' Axes 6 25 

Splitting Axes 7 00 

Handled Axes 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 

hunters. 



10 00 
18 00 



6 00 

7 00 
12 00 
10 00 

S 75 
5 25 



Underhill American Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

AXLE GREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 6 00 7 00 

Bestquality 10 00 12 00 



Hand. 



7 and 8 
6 and 6 



1 90 



Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63§ per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 
Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 and 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 

American, each 1 35 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

belting. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford. discount 50 and 10 per cent.. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 47} per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 100 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 

BLIND AND BED 8TAPLE8. 

AU sizes, per lb 07i 

BOLTS AND NUTS 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per cent. 
" " f and smaller. . 60 and 10 

" " 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" full Bq. ($2. 40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, f and 

less 55 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up.... 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

BoltEnds 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 5} to 6c. 
BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount 62} per cent. 

BUTOHER8' CLEAVERS. 

German tier doz. 6 00 9 00 

Amerioan , " 12 00 18 00 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 1 85 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 115 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. & I. X. L . . . . " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized ' 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 " 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 ■ 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 40 

Slater's felt per roll 60 

BULL RINGS. 
Copper, $1.30 for 2}-inch, and $1.70 

BUTT8. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per oent 
Wrought Steel. 

Fast Joint, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent 
Loose Pin, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent. 

CARFZT STRETCHERS. 



90 

1 50 
5 20 

12 



American per doz. 1 00 

Billiards " .... 



1 50 
6 50 



Bed, new list, discount 55 to 57} per cent. 
Plate, discount 52} to 57} per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross SO I 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, discount 70 per cent. 

Wamock's, discount 70 per cent. 

P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per oent 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis. 40 per cent. 

PLANE IRONS. 

English per doz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERb. 
Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
37} to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

man " 60 60 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEY8. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 I 00 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 22 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 40 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout .... 1 80 2 !0 



63 



HARDWARE AUD METAL 



January 6, 1906 



A Profitable Investment 

is made when you lay in a stock of Paterson's Building 
Papers and Wire Edged Ready Roofing. These goods 
have the Quality and Reputation that make them popular 
with your customers. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toron-to and Montreal. 



CONDUCTOR PIPE. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

Mnoh per 100 feet 3 00 

I " . ... " " 4 00 

4 " . ... " " 5 25 
I •• .; " " 6 75 

5 .. ;::;;::;;:;::.: •• •• 900 

1 OFPBB AND NICKEL WARE. 
Copper boiler', kettles, teapot*, etc., 45 per 

cent. 
Copper pittB, 35 per cent 

CRADLES, ORAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. * D., No. S per pair 15 

8.4D. " 5 r ' 022* 

SAD., " 6 ;; 015 

Boynton pattern 20 

DOOR SPRINOS. 

torrey's Rod per doz. .... } 75 

Coil. 9 to U in " 095 }65 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 
Coach and Wagon, discount 70 per oent. new 

Hit. 
Carpenters' disoouut 70 per oent. 

DRILLS. 

Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 37J to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUOHS. 

10-incb per 100 ft. 1 00 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

5 and 6- inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch " 148 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new liBt 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disstons 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

McClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 'o 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27J per cent. 
Nicholson FUe Co. 'a "Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50. 



GLASS. 
Window. Box Price. 

Star 



Site United Per 

Inches. 100 ft. 

Under 26 $425 

26 to 40 4 65 

41 to50 5 10 

51 to 60 5 35 

61 to 70 5 75 

71 to 80 6 25 

II to 85 7 00 

86 to 90 

91 to 95 

9! to 100 

101 to 105 

lOOtol'O 

For less than 1)0 feet of one 
list leas 331X T«rms90 days net 



Double 
Diamond 
Per 
100 ft. 
$6 25 

6 75 

7 50 

8 50 

9 75 

11 00 

12 5) 
15 00 
17 50 
20 50 
24 00 
27 51 

■ize, pane 
2J 30 days. 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

GILLETT'S POWDERED LYE. 

1-case, $3.70 ; 3-case, $3.60 ; 5-case and over, 



$3.50. 



HALTERS. 



Rope, 5-iuch per gross 

Rope, J " " 

Rope, f to J-inch " 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 11 " " 

Web " 



9 00 
12 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



HAMMERS. 

NaiL 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 27 J per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 07 08$ 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 
Store door per doz. 100 150 

Fork. 
CAB., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 
CAB., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Saw. 

American per doz 100 125 

Plane. 
American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

hangers. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

" 5-inch 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Lace's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 11J, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 21 00 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 3 75 

It x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 4 75 

harvest tools. 
Discount 60 per cent. 
8. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 
" Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 

40 off. 
" saw swages, 40 off. 

hatchets. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 42J per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

,r " 2, " 4 85 

Barrel, Unrterhill 5 00 

hat enamel. 
Henderson & Potts' "Anchor Brand " 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06} 

5-in., " 06} 

6-in., " 06 

8-in., " 05J 

10-in., " 05i 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 80 

Spring. Woodyatt pattern, per gro . No. 5, 
$17.50; No. 10, $18: No. 20, $10.80; No. 
120, $20 ; No. 51, $10 ; No. 59, $27.50. 



HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per oent. 

Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 
Tinned cast, 35 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Oast Iron. 

Birdcage per doz. 50 110 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat . . per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian d 18 " 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 62J per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

'C brand, 40, 10 and 7 J per cent. off list f O val 
M.R.M. Co. brand, 55 per cent. I head 

"Monarch," 50 and 7 J percent. 

' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 

M.R.M.'Co. brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount 50 per cent. 
PICKS. 

Star perdoz. 3 00 3 25 

KEYS. 
Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet trunk and padlock 
American per gross .... 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. A L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs perdoz 2 00 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders, dis. 40 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast per doz. 4 50 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. - 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LAWN MOWERS FOR 1906. 

Woodyatt 12 to 20-in. cut. ... $ 3 93 to $5 00 

Star, 12 to 16-in cut 2 75 to 3 05 

Daisy, all si708 2 50 

Woodyatt.ball bearing, 12 to2<Mn 5 60 to 7 45 
\ hiladelphia, King Edward and grass boxes, 
50 per cent, off 1905 list. 

Horse Lawn Mowers, "Special. 
Discount, 40 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LOOKS. 

Canadian, to 50 and 10 per cent. 
Russell & Erwin, steel rim , . .per do*. 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent.. 



Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

TinsmithB' per doz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOOK8. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 00 

MEAT CUTTERS. 
American, discoun 3i per cent. 
German, 15 per cen 
Gem each .... 115 

MILK CAN TRIMMiNGd. 
Discount 25 per cent. 

NAILS. Cut. Wire 

2d J 40 S 25 

Sd 305 2 90 

4and5d 2 80 2 65 

6and7d 2 70 2 55 

8and9d 2 55 2 40 

10 and 12d 2 50 2 35 

16and20d 2 45 2 30 

30,40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 40 2 25 

F.o.b. Toronto. 
Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent 
Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 85 50 

No.l 85 

No 1573 75 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round and ootagou, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 per cent. 
2-in. Mesh 16 w.g. 60 per cent. 
Smaller than 2 in. dis. 55 per cent. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers " .... 3 00 

OILERS. 
McClary t Model galvanized 

oil can, with pump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 
Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per cent 
Flaring Dattern, discount 45 per cert. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent. 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

PIOK8. 
Per dozen 600 900 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 135 150 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent 

• PINE TAR. 

J pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent. 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fanoy Canadian or American S7J 

40 per oent 



64 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALS 



TINPLA TES — Cokes and Charcoal 

LYD BROOK, ELYN, GRAFTON, ETC. 
CANADA PLATES -B lack and Galvanized 

GA L VA NIZED SHEETS - ' ' Sword and Torch" 
TERNE PLATES " Dean," Etc. 

POLISHED SHEETS 



BLACK SHEETS 



MACHINERY STEEL 

SINGLE REELED, DOUBLE REELED AND SMOOTH FINISH 

SUMMERLEE PIG IRON 

FOR IMPORT WHOLESALE BUYERS 



J. A. HENDERSON, 



MONTREAL 



PUNCHES. 

Saddlers per doz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductors 3 00 15 00 

rinners, solid perBet .... 72 

" hollow per inch — 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up 

razors. per doss. 

KUiot's < 00 !8 0° 

Geo. Butler si Co. s 4 00 18 00 

Bolter's 7 50 11 00 

" King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade 4 Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Wilkinson's 12 50 

Carbo Magnetic J5 00 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 00 

Griffon Safety Razors 13 50 

Griffon Stropping Machines 13 50 

Lewis Bros ' " Klean Kutter" 8 50 10 50 

Hindoo 10 50 1400 

Oresteoni's Swedish 3 50 10 00 

Henckel's 7 50 20 00 

ClausB, 50 and 10 percent. 
Clauss Strops, 50 and 10 per cent. 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

New List. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60 and 10 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 40 

per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, $-lb. 

packages lc. per lb.; Jib. packages 2c. lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Oanadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal 10$ 

PureManUla 15 

"British" Manilla 111 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 23 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

" J inch 25 28 

Russia Deep Set 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Yarn, single 10 

double 10$ 

■iisal bed cord. 48 feet per doz. 65 

■ " 60 feet " 80 

" •' 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 70 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 20 to 25 per cent 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished per set 75 

" No. 50, nickle-plated, " 80 

Common, plain 4 50 

" plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER, 

B. & A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Kmery, discount 40 per oent. 
Garnet (Rurton's). 5 to 10 per oent. advance 
on list. 

SAP SPOUT8. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

"Eureka" tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston'B, discount 12$ per cent 
3. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 035 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3, 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

frame only each 50 125 

B. & D. solid tooth circular shingle, concave 
and band, discount 50 per cent, 
mill and ice, drag, discount 30 per cent 
" croBS-cut, discount 35 per cent. 

hand saws, butcher, disc't 40 per cent 
" compass, pruning and back, discount 
45 per cent. 

" buck, New Century $6 25 

" No. 1 Maple Leaf 5 25 

" Happy Medium 4 25 

" Watch Spring 4 25 

common frame 4 OP 



SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 31 

SAW sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, Perfect 4 00 

X-CutSets, " 7 50 

SCALES, 
(iurney Standard, 40 per cent. 
Gumey Champion, 50 per cent. 
Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
Dominion, discount 55 per cent 
" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
' ' Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors.2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 75 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish pei doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 874 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 82$ pei cent. 
F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 
" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. ' 

R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 87$ per cent. 

Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Per doz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Clauss, nickel, discount 80 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 67$ per cent. 
Clauss, tailors, discount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SINKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

18x30 100 

18x36 1 40 

SNAPS. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l$-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 492 per doz. 190 2 25 

" No. 493 " 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount SO and 5 to 65 per cent. 

Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52$per oent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12$ per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Retinned, discount 75 per oent. off revised list 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 
STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 9 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " 13 

Axe " .... IE 

Turkey " 50 

Arkansas " .... 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " 28 00 

" 200 lb. and over 3100 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 16 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" J weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk.. .85, 12$ and 12 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

apanned 75 and 12$ 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet taciis 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52$ 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle naile, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zino glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, asa skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chestermau's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent. 

TRAPS (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N., P. S. & W., 45 and 5 per cent. 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Lisston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German per doz. 4 75 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 24 

4-ply 27 

Mattress per lb 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13$ 

Brook's 12] 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 S50 

K " " No. 2 5 50 

8aw Vise 450 800 

15 



Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (discount) 45 per cent. 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 

50, 10 and 10 per oent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
" Star " decorated steel and decorated white, 

25 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 15 

10 " 6c. extra. 

11 " 12c " 

12 " 20o. " 

13 " 30c. " 

14 " 40c. 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c. 

spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire 30c. 

best steel wire 75c., bright soft drawn 15o., 

charcoal (extra quality) 01.25, packed in casks 

or cases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 

and 100-lb. bundles 10c., in 25-lb. bundles 

15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 

hanks, 50c, in $-lb. hanks 75o., in $-lb. 

hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 27$ per oent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
$5— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6— No. 20, $6.65- 
No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30— No 23, $7,65— No. 
24, $8— No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50— No. 27, 
$10— No. 28, $11— No. 29, $12— No. 30, $13- 
No.31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
5c— oiling, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,il5o.— ins 
and 10-lb. bundleB, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c 
—in $-lb. hanks, 38c— in i-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 

Brass wire, discount 52$ per cent, off the list. 

Copper wire, discount 52$ per cent, net oath 
30 days, f.o.b factory. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 1 and 5. 
$3.70 to $3.70— Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to $3.15 
—No. 9, $2.55 — No. 10, $3.20 to $3.20 
—No. 11, $3.25 to $3 25 — No. 12, $2.65 
-No. 13, $2.75-No. 14. $3.75 to $3.75-No 
15, $4.30 -No. 16. $4.30 from stock. Base 
sizes, Nos. 6 to 9, $2.17$ f.o.b. Cleveland. 
In oarlor* 12$c less. 

Clothes Line Wire, 7 wire solid line, No. 
17. $4.90: No. 18, $3.00; No. 19, 2.70: 6 
wire solid line, No. 17, $4.45; No. 18, $2.80 
No. 19, $2.50. All prices per 1000 ft. measure, 
F.o.b. Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 75 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 75 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2.4;$ for 
small lots and $2.30 for carlo te. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

HighCarbon, No. 9 $2 60 

No. 11 3 26 

No. 12 2 85 

WIRE OLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per 100 so. ft., net. . I 50 
Terms, 2 per oent. off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting per doz 56 00 

Square " " 69 00 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 36 00 

New Century, per doz 72 00 

Daisy 48 00 

WRINGERS. 

Leader, 11 in per doz 32 00 

Royal Canadian, 11 in. " .... 29 00 

Royal American, 11 in. ' 29 "0 

Terms, 3 months, 2 per oent. SO days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make discount 40 per oent. 



HARDWARB AND MBTAL January 6, 1906 

STORM KING TRACK -ethb STORM KING HANGER 



is the most popular Flexible Hanger 
Track made in Canada. Popular because 
it surpasses all others in quality and 
workmanship. 

The discriminating bujer specifies 
"Storm King" Brand— the Perfect Track. 

Every piece stamped "Genuine Storm 
King" with our name. 

Ask Your Jobber 

Hamilton, Canada 




MADE BY 



SAFETY DOOR HANGER CO., 




Walker's Quick and Easy Meat and Fruit Juice Press 

Made to clamp to the table or hold in the hand. They are made in 
three sizes and three styles of each size; capacity, one-half pound of meat 
at a press full. 

As all the juice is out as soon as screwed down, several pounds can be 
pressed in short space of time. The real capacity is equal to others of larger 
and more expensive prices. 

ERIE SPECIALTY CO., ERIE, PA., U.S.A. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



A 

Alabastine Co ■ *•* 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 45 

American Steel and Wire Co 4 

Atkins, E. C, * Co 13 

Armstrong Mfg. Co •» 

AtlasMfg.Co « 

Auer Light Co ' 

B 

Batty 8tore Co 6} 

Birkett, Thoe., ft Son Co 1 

Borden Co »•> 

Bradstreet's " 

c 

Canada Brass Boiling Mills 61 

Canada Horw Nail Oo 44 

Canada lion Furnace Co 31 

Canada Metal Co 57 

Canada Paint Co 39 

Canada Paper Co 12 

Canada Smelting W orks 4o 

Canadian Fairbanks Co. 59 

Canadian General Electric Co 60 

Canadian Heating ft Ventilating Oo. . 41 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 45 

Carter Pub. Co 15 

Carriage Mountings Mfg. Co 57 

Caverhill. Learmont 4Co 9 

Clause Shear Oo 63 

Claybrough & Johnston 12 

CluB. R. J., *Co 58 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co..... 4o 

Consumers' Cordage Co 10 

Continental Heat and Light Co *i 

Crain, RoUaL.Co ab 

CovertMlg. Oo . 45 

OutM. 0. M. ftCo 60 

D 

Dana Mfg. Co 11 

David, K. Sullivan ...... 14 

Davidson. Thoe.. Mfg. Co 2 

Dennis Wire ft Iron Co 12 

Deaeron'o Iron Co 31 

Dieckmann, Ferdinand 48 

Divine Wattr Motor Co 14 

Dominion Belting Co 14 

I >i .minion Cartridge Co 1 ; 

Dominion Sewer Pipe Oo 59 

Dorken Broa. ouUide front cover 

Dowswell Mfg. Co 10 

Draft Excluder 4 • 



E 

Eadie, H. G 12 

Eagle Cooperage Works 7 

Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Akron, Ohio 

inside back cover 

Erie Specialty Oo 66 

F 

Falkiner, H. F 12 

Fenner, Frederick 37 

Fisher, A. D., Oo 13 

Frothingham ft Workman 7 

Q 

Gibb, Alexander 61 

GilbertBon, W., ft Oo 14 

Glauber Brass Co 56 

Grautoff, B. A., ft Co 37 

Greening, B., Wire Oo 1 

Grey ft Bruce Portland Oement Oo 45 

Gurney Foundry Co 42,61 

Gurney, Tilden Oo 49 

Gutta Peroha and Rubber Mfg. Oo 

outside baok cover 

H 

Hamilton Cotton Co 37 

Hamilton Rifle Co 47 

Harris, J. W„ Co 41 

Heinisch, R., Sons Oo 14 

Henderson, J. A 65 

Henderson ft Potts Oo 38 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 8 

Howland, H. 8., Sons ft Oo 35 

Hyde,F. 4 Oo 31 

I 

Imperial Cement Co 45 

Imperial Vamisb and Color Co 38 

Ironside, Son & Co , 13 

J 

James ft Reid 12 

Jardine, A. B., ft Oo 6')' 

Jenking. A 60 

Johnson's. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 34 

Joy Manufacturing Co 41 

K 

Kemp Mfg. Oo 16 

Kerr Engine Co 6j 



Lamplough, F. W., 4 Co 4 

Leslie, A 0., ft Co 31 

Lewis Bros. ft Oo 3 

Lewis, Rice, & Son inside front cover 

Lockerby ft McComb 49 

London Rolling Mill Oo. .inside back cover 

Loughead, J. S., ft Son 12 

Luf kin Rule Oo inside back cover 

Lysaght, John. outside front cover 

Mo 

McArthur, Alex., ft Oo 62 

McOaskill, Dougall ft Oo 37 

McDougall, R. Co 31 

McLean & Sophus 7 

M 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Oo 5 

MerreUMfg. Oo 56 

Metallic Roofing Oo 27 

Moffat Stove Oo 43 

Morton, B. K., ft Oo 31 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co 50 

Morrow, John. Machine Screw Oo 14 

Mueller, H.Mfg. Oo 59 

Munro Wire Works 29 

N 

Naturo Oo 58 

Newman, W., ft Sons 56 

Nicholson File Co out«ide back cover 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Ooal Oo 31 



Oakey, John, ft Sons 31 

Oneida Oommunity inside back cover 



Ontario Lantern Co. 

Ontario Tack Co 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co . 

Oshawa Steam ft Gas Ftting Oo 

Ottawa Furnace and Foundry Co 



37 
32 
14 
58 
60 



Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Oo 56 

Page Wire Fence Co 29 

Paterson Mfg. Oo 64 

Pease Foundry Co 48 

Penberthy Injector Oo 55 

Perfection Safety Furnace Pipe Co 43 

Phillips. Ohas. D 45 

Pink, Thos 6 



Ramsay, A., ft Son Co 53 

Round, John, ft Son 4 

s 

Sadler ft Ha worth outside back cover 

Safety Door Hanger Oo 66 

Samuel, M. ft L., Benjamin, ft Co 2 

Scott, Greenwood 4 Co 61 

Sells Commercial 12 

Seymour, Henry T. , Shear Co 14 

Sharratt ft Newth 39 

Shaw, A.jft Son 14 

Sherwin-Williams Co 33 

Silica Barytic Stone Oo 45 

Smith ft Hemenway Oo 60 

Spear ft Jackson 11 

Stairs, Son ft Morrow 57 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Oo 50 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 37 

Stanley Rule and Level Oo 13 

Stephens, G. F.. ft Oo 28 

Sterne, G. F., ft Son 43 

Stevens, Ernst 60 

Summers, John, ft Sons 6 



Taylor-Forbes Oo, . .. . outside front cover 

Thompson, B. ft S. H., Oo 

outside back cover 

Thome, R. E 61 

u 

United Brass Mfg. Co 53 

w 

Walker Steel Range Co 42 

rVallace Barnes Co 60 

Welsh Tinplate ft Metal Stamping Co.. 15 

Western Wire Nail Oo 37 

Whittaker Stove Works 43 

Wilcox MJg. Co 13 

Wilkinson Plow Oo 12 

Winnipeg Ceiling and Roofing Co.... 29 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co 29 

Wright, E. T.,ftOo 41 



66 



January 6, 1906 CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. Hardware and Metal 



Ash Sifter. 

Cutts, O. M., 4 Co., Toronto Junction. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Carriage Mounting Co , Toronto. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 
Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Uutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 

Toronto. 
Sadler 4 Haworth, Montreal 4 Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson s, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 
Fitohburg, Mass 

Brass Goods. 

Canada Brass Rolling Mills, Toronto. 
Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., BrasB Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Ouelph. Ont. 
United Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Bronze Powders. 

Thorne, R. E., Montreal. 

Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Brushes. 

Ramsay, A., 4 Son Co., Montreal. 
Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co. , Winnipeg. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Frothingham 4 Workman Co., Montreal. 
Gurney, Tilden Co., Hamilton. 
Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby 4 McConib, Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Newman 4 Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smart, James, Mfg. Co., Brockville.Ont. 
Smith 4 Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule 4 Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Winnipeg Ceiling 4 Roofing Co. .Winnipeg 
Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Carriage Mountings Co. , Toronto. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Loughead, J. S., 4 Son, Sarnia, Ont. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls. 

Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H. 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Speoialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Customs Brokers, 

Turnbull4 Henderson, Vancouver, B.C. 

Cutlery— Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Trios. , 4 Son Co., Ottawa. 
Clauss Shear Co., Toronto 
Durken Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, E. F., 4 Co., MontreaL 

Door Hangers. 

Safety Door Hanger Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian Aluminum Works, Montreal. 
Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh 4 Co., Montreal. 

Emery Wheel Dresser Cutters. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Emery Wheel Dressers. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buff alo 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. & H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Waiter, MontreaL 

Financial Institutions 

Bradstreet Co. 



Fire Brick. Furnace and Stove 
Cement, etc. 

Sterne, G. F.. k Son. Brantford. 
Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Claybrough k Johnstone, Birmingham, 

Eng. 
Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Food Choppers 

Caverhill, Learmont k Co., Montreal. 
Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Galvanizing. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co. 
Toronto. 
Garden & Farm Implements. 

Wilkinson Plough Co., Toronto Junction. 
Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co. , Tillsonburg. 

Gas and Acetylene Lamps, 
Mantles, etc. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 

Continental Heat k Likht Co., Montreal. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharratt k Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., k Son, London, Eng. 
Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Glue. 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Hack Saws. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 
Gurney, Tilden Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 

Hollow Ware. 

Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamping 
Co., Llanelly, Wales. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co., Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers. 
Oluff, R. J., k Co., Torono. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Btob. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — A utomatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 
Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

La dders — Ex tension. 

Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co. , Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos., k Son Co., Ottawa. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Grain, Rolla L. , Co., Ottawa. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Gurney, Tilden Co., Hamilton. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., k Co., Pembroke, Ont. 

Machinery Supplies. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Jardine, A. B., k Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., New York. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co.,Ingersoll,Ont. 
Penberthy Iniector Co., Windsor. 

Machines — Power Hack Saw. 

Diamond Saw k Stamping Worbs.Buffalo 

Mantles, Grates and Tiles. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents and 
Brokers. 

Gibb, Alexander, MontreaL 
Jenking. A. C, 4 Co., Montreal. 
Rogers, Herbert 4 Co., London, Eng. 
Thome, R. E., Montreal and Toronto. 

Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto \ 
David, R. Sullivan, Montreal. 
Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 
Eadie, H. G., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman, Montreal. 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Gilbertson., W., Pontardawe, Wales. 
Henderson, J. A., Montreal. 
Ironside, Son 4 Co., London, Eng. 



Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Leslie, A. C, 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Samuel, k Co.. Dudley, Eng, 
Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Morton, B. K, k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.8. 
Samuel, Benjamin 4 Co., Toronto. 
Saunders, Franklin 4 Co., Montreal. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax. N.S. 
Summers, Join i, 4 Sun, Stalybridge, Eng 
Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Moutreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc 

Solarine Company, Chicago. 
Oakey, John, 4 Sons, London, Eng. 

Mop Wringers and Buckets. 
Eagle Cooperage Works, Circleville, O. 

Nails and Spikes. 

Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes and 
Glass. 

Canada Paint Co. , Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Dods, P. D„ 4 Co., Montreal. 
Fenner, Fred., & Co., London, Eng. 
Henderson 4Potts Co., Moutreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. C, 4 Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice 4 Son, Toronto. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Corneille 4 Co., Montreal. 
McCaskiil, Dougall 4 Co., Montreal. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay 4 Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish WorkB 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome, W. H., St. John, N.B. 
Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Borden Co,, Warren, Ohio. 
Canada Brass Rolling Mill, Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Jardine, A. B., 4 Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., Boston, Mass. 
Lewis Rice 4 Son, Toronto. 
Merrell Mfg. Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Mueller, H., Mfg. Co., Decatur, 111. 
Naturo Co., Salem, N.J. 
Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Fitting Co.,Oshawa 
Page-Hersey Iron 4 Tube Co., Guelph. 
Stairs, Son 4 Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
United Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Utica Drop Forge 4 Tool Co., New York. 

Portland Cement. 

Canadian Portland Cement Co., Toronto 

Grey 4 Bruce Portland Cement Co., 
Owen Sound. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 

Hyde, F., 4 Co., Montreal. 

Imperial Cement Co., Owen Sound. 

Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., MontreaL 

Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 



RooBng Supplies. 



Jenking, A. 0., 4 Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex., <fe Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle 4 Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto 4 MontreaL 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Saws. 

Atkins, E.G., 4 Co., Indianapolis, Ind 

Lewis Bros., Montreal. 

Spear 4 Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 

Saws — Hack. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Saws — Hack Frames. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Saws — Power Hack. 

Diamond Saw k Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Sa ws — Kitchen. 

Diamond Saw 4 Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
New Warren Scale Co., Montreal. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Canada Foundry Co. , Toronto. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 
Ingersoll, Ont. 



Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
' Hyde, F., 4 Co.. Montreal. 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Silverware. 

Round, John, 4 Son, Sheffield, Eng. 

Skates, Etc. 

Fisher, A. D., Co., Toronto. 
Starr Mfg. Co., Dartmouth, N.S. 

Stable Fixtures. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Oni 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, 0. F., 4 Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K., 4 Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel 4 Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Storage Warehouse. 

Mackenzie Bros., Winnipeg. " 

Stoves and Tinware, Radia- 
tors, Furnaces, etc. 

Canadian Heating 4 Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Dieckmann, Ferdinand, Cincinnati. 
Collins Mfg, Co., Toronto. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London, Ont. 
Harris, J. W., Co., Mom real. 
James 4 Reid, Perth, Ont. 
Joy Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfif. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London. 
McLean, Holt 4 Co., St. John, N.B. 
Metal Stamping Co., Jackson, Mich. 
Moffat Stove Co., Weston, Out 
Ottawa Furnace andFdy. Co., Ottawa. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto, 
rerfection Safety Futnaoe Pipe Co., 

Toronto. 
Smart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Brockville, Ont. 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Walker Steel Range Co., Grimsby, Ont. 
Wright, E. T.,4 Co., Hamilton. 

Tacks. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 
Peck Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 

Tub Hoops. 

Watt 4 Squire, Brantford. 

Typewriters and Supplies. 

United Typewriter Co., Montreal. 

Wall Coating. 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 

Winnipeg Paint 4 Ulass Co., Winnipeg. 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., 4 Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill, Learmont 4 Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham 4 Workman, MontreaL 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 
Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. 4 Co., MontreaL 
Lewis, Rice, 4 Son, Toronto. 
Stairs, Son k Morrow, Halifax, N.B. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisma 

Hobbs Mfg. Oo., London, Ont. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 

Wire Springs. 

Guelph Spring Axle Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Henderson, J. A., MontreaL 
Wallace-Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Cutts, 0. M., Toronto Junotion. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal 
Great West Wire Fence Co., Winnipeg. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son 4 Co., London, Eng. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Munro Wire Works, Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Walter, E. F. 4 Co., MontreaL 
Western Wire 4 Nail Co., London, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 



Wrapping Papers. 



Canada Paper Co., Torento. 
MoArthui, Alex.. ,4 Co., MontreaL 



67 



HARDWARE AMD METAL 



January 6, 1906 



Book for Plumbers, Steam Fitters 



Etc. 



Furnace Heating 



By W. G. Snow. 

The author has prepared a book of reference for the 
furnace man or the architect. There are tables which 
have been tested by years of practical use. They are of 
great value to the practical furnace man. 

170 pages, 6 x 9 in.; 90 illustrations; cloth bound. 
Price, post paid, - - $1.50 
(This book has had a heavy sale in Canada.) 



Kitchen Boiler Connections. 

A selection of practical letters and articles relating 
to water backs and range boilers. 

The work is divided into two parts, the first on 
water backs and boilers and their connections, and the 
second on heating rooms from range boilers, a topic that 
has much practical interest to the plumber. There are 
few lines of work where so many little difficulties arise, 
and therefore the discussion of different questions which 
have arisen should be of great interest as well as prac- 
tical value to workers in this line. 

Fifth enlarged edition; 194 pages; 6 x 9J inches; 113 
illustrations. 

Cloth, postpaid, $1 



Formulas and Tables for Heating. 

Being German formulas and tables for heating and 

ventilating work, for those who plan or erect heating 

apparatus. By J. H. Kinealy, M.E.; 56 pages; 4£ x 7 
inches; leather. 



Price, post paid, 

• ^ • 



$i 



American Sanitary Plumbing. 

By J. J. Lawler. 

For plumbers, steam fitters, architects, builders, ap- 
prentices, etc. Containing practical information of all 
the principles involved in the mechanics and science of 
modern plumbing, illustrating with original sketches the 
fundamental principles of everything the plumber should 
know. Everything explained in the most simple language, 
so that it will be impossible to misunderstand anything. 

Large !2mo, cloth, post paid, - $2 



Steam and Hot Water Fitters' 
Text Book. 

A book prepared for the Steam and Hot Water Heat- 
ing Course at the New York Trade School, with supple- 
mentary chapters on house heating, specifications and sur- 
face estimating; by Thos. E. McNeill. 

This book will be appreciated by those who wish to 
master the principles of steam and hot water heating. 
The definitions in the beginning deal with the appliances, 
and little by little the reader is led on until at the close 
he is informed how to figure surfaces, lay out plans and 
install heating apparatus with the necessary piping. 

140 pages; numerous illustrations and diagrams; 5x7 
inches. 



Cloth, post paid, 



$1 



Plumbing and House Draining Problems 

A selection of articles for practical plumbers. 

This volume provides reliable and practical informa- 
tion for ready reference and assistance to plumbers who 
are confronted by problems with which they have had no 
previous experience. One-half of the edition is devoted to 
new problems and special articles. This book will prove 
a valuable reference in any plumber's library. 

297 pages; 6x9 inches; 146 illustrations. 
Cloth, post paid, $2 



Practical Gas Fittings. 

Describing how to run mains, lay pipes and put up 
gas fixtures. 116 pages; 54 illustrations; 5| x 8 inches. 

Cloth, post paid, - - $i 



Practical Hints on Joint Wiping. 

A book containing articles on practical joint wiping 
for beginners in plumbing, with an appendix giving a 
selection of practical letters and articles. 



66 pages; 5£ x 8; 41 illustrations. 
Paper, post paid, 



25c. 



Send for Full List of Books. 



THE MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



68 



January 6, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars In Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half-Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

OOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 




LUFKIN 



MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 

ARE THE BE8T AND MOST POPULAR TAPE3 IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



London Office* and Warehouse — 48 Lime St. 



New York City Branch— 280 Broadway. 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



FURS ARE VALUABLE 



Don't allow your catch to escape because 
caught in a poor trap. GENUINE NEWHOUSE 
trap will hold the game and earn its extra 
cost several times in a season. 




Newhouse Steel Traps 

ARE ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 
Made Since 1848 by 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 



Write for Catalogue 



NIAGARA FALLS, Oni. 



(^***^4****.«MH»*******4****t>#*£***» 



PFLUEGER'S 
Fishing TacKle 



% Hoohs, Flies, 
Trolls, Spin- 
ners, Phan- 
toms, Reels, 
Furnish ed 
Lines. 

Ever y thing 
in Fishing 
TacKle. 



I 

I 




! 



NOTICE — Free to Any Dealer in Sporting Goods, 
Sent Express Prepaid, 155-Page Illustrated Cata- 
logue No. F23, Metal Fish Sign and Window 
Transparency in 8-Color Lithograph. 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. 

AKRON, Ohio 



1 



KI ED 

_U thy*"-** 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 6, !P06 



Cut B.'ok No. ¥-7 

Our ifc£- 




Motto 

for 

1906 

Standard of Excellence 

Thirty-Five Years 
Manufacturing... 1 

NICHOLSON FILE CO. (Dominion Works) Port Hope, Ont. 



I 



Unsurpassed Value 

EIS and 



Prompt Shipments 



"Redstone" H * h Pressure Sheet Packing 

A packing thai will hold. For u =j in highest pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this packing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on the 
market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 

Manufactured tolely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO., 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 



Head Offices: 
47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 



Branches : 
Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



WINDOW 
GLASS 

Send us your specifications 
and we will quote you lowest 
discounts for all qualities — 




B.&S.H.THOMPSQN&Co, 



MONTREAL 



LIMITED 



[ACENT8 FOR 

EMILE RECMERS:&*CO. 
CHARLEROI, BELGIUM 



SADLER *HAWORTH 



"E&tVM 



Standard 




WAREHOUSES 3c FACTORIES 



AT 



MONTR EAL ^TORONT O. 





... " 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Also in Grttt Britain. United States. "West Indies. South Africa and Australia. 

HARDWARE^METAL 

A WeeKly Newspaper devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVIII. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 13, 1906 



NO. 2. 



V 



3j 




MANUFACTURER 

OP 



ARROW^BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

HARDWARE .< 

%> SPECIALITIES OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 



•ill I FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES. IT'' 



"/, 



.Qj 



<r> 



A GOOD START 

This year begins with a larger tonnage 
booked for Canada than ever before at 

this season of "Queen's Head" and 
" Fleur de Lis," the popular brands. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited. Makers, 
BRISTOL, ENG. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL. 
Managers Canadian Branch. 




LAWN MOWERS THAT SELL 



The selling quality of Lawn Mowers is so important to you that the salable points of 
different machines should be well considered before you order. Our 

Lawn Mowers 

strikingly illustrate the principle that to produce the best mowers you must have the 
best methods and the best material — two factors, more than any others, that influence sales. 

The Cylinders in our machines are manufactured from the most expensive steel procur- 
able. All the castings are machine made ; therefore of one size and uniform. Every part 
of our mowers is interchangeable and easily duplicated from stock, and only skilled work- 
men are employed by us. 

We guarantee all our Lawn Mowers and the styles are varied enough to suit every 
demand. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER ABOUT OUR MACHINES 

Taylor -Forbes Company, 



Limited 



Branch : 
21 Richmond St. W., Toronto, Ont. 



THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF HARDWARE IN CANADA 

Head Office and Works : 



Cuelph, Ont. 



Branch : 
9 De Bresoles St., Montreal, Que. 



See damnified List of Advertisements on Page 79. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 ^ 



SLEIGH BELLS 






RETURNED 

IP- 




DOME BELLS 



BACK STRAPS g 
BODY £ 

L 

S 



NEW BEVEL BELLS 



»-**- 



SWEDISH SLEIGH 
RETURNSB 



BELLS 



TEAM 
COLLAR 




SHAFT GONGS 



HORSE 

BLANKETS 
SURCINGLES 
SWEAT PADS 




H 






No, 80— SADDLE CHIMES 



No. 78-SADDLE CHIMES No. 76 SADDLE CI^Tj 

WRITE F-OR PRICES 




/ 



RICE LEWIS 




SON 



( 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



This is a specimen of one of our advertisements which regu- 
larly appear in all leading publications. All results therefrom 
are referred to the dealer in the town from whence they 
come. SEND FOR BOOKLET WITH TRADE PRICES. 



PRICE8: 

Hollow Ground 

$2.00 

Double Concave for 

Extra Heavy Beards 

$2 SO 

Pair in Leather Case 

$4.50 

Ca rbo-Magnetlc 

Strop SI. 00 




NO NEW BLADES NO ANNUAL TAX 

FIRST PURCHASE PRICE THE ONLY EXPENSE 

If you will send us your dealer's name and let us know whether he handles the 
Carbo-Magnetic razor, we will send you our booklet, "Hints on Shaving," 
Fr©©, and also make you a proposition whereby we will arrange with your dealer that 
you can test and use one of these razors without any risk or obligation on your 
part. The booklet illustrates the correct razor position for every part of the face, and 
gives much needed information to all self shavers. The Carbo-Magnetic razor is for 
sale by most good dealers who guarantee it — we back their guarantee. Send for 
book to-day. 

Firm of A. L. SILBERSTEIN, 459 Broadway, New York 



Browning Automatic Shot Gun 

Also 

Full line of Single and Double- 
Barrel Breech Loading Guns, 

Winchester, Savage and Marlin 
Sporting Rifles 

in all models. 

Shot and Ball Cartridges 

in 

Smokeless and Black Powder. 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 



LIMITED 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF HARDWARE 

OTTAWA, 0NT. 



-^-^"YANKEE TOOLS" «?™« 

SCREWDRIVERS la^ The NEWEST, CLEVEREST and QUICKEST SELLING TOOLS 

of the KIND. 




No SO— RECIPROCATING DRILL, for woodtor metals. 
SOLD BY LEADING JOBBERS 
SEND FOR OUR NEW "YANKEE" TOOL BOOK 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



Davidson's Milk Can Trimmings 




and Milk Cans with Broad Hoop 
Patent Roll Rim Bottoms 

are in great demand and their 
general popularity is increasing 
yearly. 

They give satisfaction to users 
and dealers alike. 



IMPORTANT 

The best mechanical skill ob- 
tainable is utilized to make David- 
son's Milk Can Trimmings perfect 



IN COMPLETE SETS 

"BrcJad Hoop Pattern— Com- • 

posed of the following: i Broad in even the smallest details. 

Hoop Bottom. 1 Cover. 1 Centre 
Hoop li inches wide, 20 gauge, 1 

Mes^piirJide^n'dii r Write for Price List. 




Heavy Rolled Edges make our Patent Bottoms doubly 
durable and waggon and factory floor protectors. 



Some customers do not like to send 
us small orders. That's a mistake. 

We take them, large or smail. We 
are waiting for your order now. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

Montreal and Winnipeg 



IN. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 

have removed their offices and 
warehouse to 54-56-58 Front West. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



IM 



English House -18 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND 

2 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



$ 



$■ 



•$• 



$• 



$• 



$• 



$- 



$• 



$ 



A MONEY RAISER 




RETURNED 

JAN 13 1906 



% 



BLACK DIAMOND" RAZOR 



$• 



$" 



$ 



$• 



$• 



■$ 



$" 



NO. 65.— 5-8 INCH BLADE, SQUARE POINT, HOLLOW 
GROUND, ETCHED, WHITE CELLULOID HANDLE. 



$- 



NO HONING REQUIRED 



For a first-class all-round, up-to-date razor the "BLACK 
DIAMOND" is equal to anything on the market and during the 
past year has had the largest sale of any line sold by a 
Jobbing House. 

The steel used in its manufacture is the very best and is 
tempered by a special process. The finish, forging and 
grinding, produced by skilled mechanics, insuring the pur- 
chaser durability and quality. 

It is set ready for use and fully warranted to shave for 
years without requiring honing, not to be too hard or too 
soft, and to be free from any imperfection. 

It should be stropped on a good clean strop. A poor 
strop and razor paste are injurious to a good razor. 

CANADIAN DISTRIBUTORS 

LEWIS BROS., Ltd 



MONTREAL 



OTTAWA 
TORONTO 



NA/IINJIMI 



VANCOUVER 
OAL.OARY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 




WHEELS A RRG WS 

LA WN ROLLERS, SCRAPERS 



, I WELL AND STRONGLY BUILT, ATTRACTIVELY PAINTED 



Garden, Stable and Contractors' Barrows of every descrip- 
tion. Also " odd " styles for all kinds of work. 
Drag and Wheel Scrapers for excavating and railway 
work, Lawn Rollers, large, small, balanced handle. 
Full weighted and nicely finished. 

We are glad to send you our catalogue and quote you prices 



The WILKINSON PLOUGH CO., limited, TORONTO, CANADA 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

21 State Street. 



Montreal 

Bank of Ottawa Building. 



Chicago 

The Rookery. 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



JOHN ROUND ®> SON, Limited 



Manufacturing; 



** 



NS "ltR^ T 4 A Df A, 



GOLDSMITHS and SILVERSMITHS ^ GQ Q 

Contractors to 
H. M. ADMIRALTY & WAR OFFICE 




€E>0©@ 



Tudor Works : 
SHEFFIELD, England 

and 
112 HATT0N GARDEN, LONDON 



ESTABLI SHED 1847 

Manufacturers of all Kinds of- 



GOLD, SILVER, ELECTRO PLATE ON 
NICKEL and BRITANNIA METAL GOODS, 
SILVER and PLATED CUTLERY, STEEL 
CUTLERY, OAK and INLAID GOODS 

WITH SILVER AND PLATED MOUNTS 



Our Manufactures have a world-wide repu- 
tation of over 50 years' standing. We are 
the largest makers of spoons in the world. 

We want to mail our Catalogues to all Canadian 
Dealers, will YOU send us YOUR name ? 



HOTEL and SHIP'S OUTFITS, special goods for hard 
wear. Special designs for all purposes sup- 
plied free. 

WHATEVER YOUR REQUIREMENTS ARE DROP US A LINE 



Showrooms and Warehouses : - COHStine Building, MONTREAL 






January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have You Seen Them ? 

For Beauty, FinisH and Quality, tHe 
'* Maple Leaf* Harvest Tools are unexcelled. 




No. 122. Manure ForK 




No. 249. Beet ForK 



No. 136. Spading ForK 









No. 108. Hay ForK 




No. -43. Patent V. Blade Hoe 



• 



TO THE HARDWARE TRADE:- 

When placing your order for harvest tools with your jobber it will be to your advantage 
to specify for the "Maple Leaf" Harvest Tools. Should your jobber be unable to supply 
them, send your order to us and it will receive prompt and careful attention. 

The Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co., Limited, Tillsonburg, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 




Pifvlf'c MADE IN CANADA 

Lumbering 
Tools 

THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 
Zealand, Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Round Bill Peavys, Handled in Split Maple 
Pink's Duck Bill Winter Cant Hooks, Handled in 

Split Maple. 
Finest Quality Split Maple Cant Hook and Peavy 

Handles, Car Load or Dozen. 

Boom Chains, Pike Poles, Skidding Tongs, Boat 
Winches, etc. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail 
Hardware Merchants. 



I Can Furnish You with the 



Send for Catalogue 
and Price List 



Brazil Patent Snow Plough and Road Maker; 
also The DesJardin Patent Log Sleighs 

THOMAS PINK & CO., Pembroke, Ont, Canada l S'S 



John Summers & Sons, Limited 



Hawarden Bridge Works, 
Shotton, Flintshire, England 




two Works cover more than 50 acres. Our output of Galvanized Sheets exceeds 2,000 tons weekly, and we employ over 2,500 men. 




LARGEST 
MAKERS 
OF 



GALVANIZED SHEETS 

_— — IN ENGLAND 

One year's production from these works 
7 1 N D M^< would put a girdle of Galvanized Sheets 

^S T 8^-^ right around the earth. 



TRADE MARK 



Agent: F. Hankin, Montreal 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



KEEP UP THE VARIETY 

of your stock. 

The tendency of customers to trade with you 
is your most valuable asset. You are making- the 
most of this asset only when you are coming - the 
nearest to supplying" all the wants of your 
customers. 



The Elgin Adjustable Alligator Wrench, 7 ins., nickel plal 
This wrench may be had with rethrcading dies and I 
3/16, 3/8, 7/16 and 1/2. 



.(Hi, I I, 



So long as you continue to force customers to 
go elsewhere for an article they reasonably expect 
to find in your store, you are failing - to improve 
your opportunities to the utmost. Besides, every 
time you tell a customer that you do not handle an 
item he has called for, by thus forcing him to go 
elsewhere, you are helping your own customer to 
form the habit of.trading at another store. 

Sort up your stock, get a greater variety, do 
business the way people want it done, whether that's the way you prefer or not, and begin at once 
to enjoy some of the larger trade that is yours for the trying. 

WE BELIEVE no other jobbing house in Canada has as large a variety of WRENCHES as 

ourselves. 



THESE ARE SELLERS 
f — -— 




RETURNED 






Holder and 



J A N ir~" 

Extra Jaws make wrench 
good as new. 



Frothingham & Workman, Limited 

Wholesale Hardware and Iron Merchants 

founded 1809 MONTREAL, CANADA 




Here Is A Seller! 

You can sell a pair of S. & S. Cogged Scissors to 
every one in your town who works with such materials as 
leather, rubber, packing:, linoleum and asbestos. 

The lower blade is cogged, thus holding the material 
in place for the sharp upper blade to cut it. 



Canadian Agents 



McLEAN S SOPHUS. 301 St. James Street, MONTREAL 




QUALITY COUNTS 




That's why there are more "EAGLE MCP 
WRINGERS AND BUCKETS COMBINED" sold than 
any other make. 

Are made right in every particular. 
Made to give perfect service and long wear. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER OR WRITE US FOR PRICES. 

EAGLE COOPERAGE WORKS 

CIRCLEVILLE, OHIO, U.S.A. 

Sole Manufacturers. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 




FREE to DEALERS: 




Calendar for 1906 on condition that the coupon below is properly 

niied out and mailed to us attached to your business letter-head. 

This fishing scene is beautifully colored and will be admired 
by all who see it in your office, store or home. 

Send in your name at once before our supply is exhausted. 



THE H0RT0N MANUFACTURING COMPANY, - Bristol, conn., u.s.a. 



Do you sell Fishing Tackle? 

Do you handle <JffisfeP Steel Fishing Rods ? 
Name 



Address 



'1 



(Cut this out, attach to your tetter-head and mail to The Horton Mfg. Co., Bristol, Conn.) 



•-•*>•>♦>•, 



Y 
♦ 

f 

% 

y 



MANY OF THE BEST ARCHITECTS ARE SPECIFYING 



Stanley's Bail-Bearing Hinges 



FOR ALL THEIR IMPORTANT WORK. 



DEALERS SHOULD HAVE THEM IN STOCK. 




CUT OF WASHER 

FULL SIZE 

IT IS SO CONSTRUCTED 

THAT IT WILL NOT 

COME APART 

IN USE 



°> 



STANLEY 



c 




r 



WORKS. 



O) 




o 



MADE IN 

WROUGHT 

BREEZE 

AND 

STEEL 



ARTISTIC BOOKLET ON APPLICATION. 

THE STANLEY WORKS, New Britain, Conn. 



FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 



1 

V 

? 

V 

? 



J 
? 
X 
I 
? 
y 
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y 
y 
y 

y 
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y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 
y 



Y 

8 



mm 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



40 

YEARS 

TEST 



No. as 



13 



r 



No. 113 



» 



19i 



No. 12 



*u/ e & 7 00a P'^e , ron W W4^ J * 

JVfo^ *>« can t/la t it u V &fa "/e v 



^ Xc e//ent , IaI . ■ y have h & ^e /h*. 

Tb ey a J 9 a/ities - eeQ the beJ * **« the* u 



**i(toro 



*£** 



-4*/) 



^/Ary* 



//>*G 



1AH 1 



1906 



No. HO 



IRON SMOOTH PLANE 
Style of Nos. 1. 2. 3, A. 4% 



RETURNED 40 

YEARS 
BEST 



HARDWARE AND METAL January 13, 1906 

♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
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: 
: 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
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♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



We manufacture Cordage and Binder Twine of every variety. 
We solicit your 1906 business for the following brands: 

Blue Ribbon, 650 ft per lb. 
Red Cap, 600 " 

Tiger, 550 " 

Standard, 500 

Golden Crown, 500 " 

Consumers Cordage Co., 



MILLS: HONTREAL and HALIFAX 



Limited 



BRANCHES : 



W. A. C. HAMILTON, 11 Front Street East, Toronto, Ont.; F. H. ANDREWS & SON, Quebec, P.Q.; 

MacGOWAN & CO., Vancouver, B.C.; CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited, St. John, N.B.; GEO. WOOD, London, Eng. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg Distributors of our Binder Twine for Northwest. 



♦ 

I 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

x 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

i 

♦ 




Style 



The Very Newest 

Combination, Bow Lever and Side Pedal drive ; oper- 
ated from a sitting or standing position. Bicycle Ball 
Bearings. Very easy running. Barrel quickly detachable 
from frame. 



The Best Ever 

Easiest running and highest 
grade Rotary Washer made. 

Test proves best. Try it and 
profit. Nothing like it on the 
market. 

Gears enclosed. Impossible for 
children to get their fingers caught. 



THESE ARE TRADE BR11SGERS 




THE "SNOWBALL" 



Made solely by 



"" L HA moTr A ea" * S ° N ' THE D0WSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

Eastern Agents HAMILTON, - ONTARIO 



10 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE ROPE 



ALL KINDS AND SIZES AND 
FOR ALL PURPOSES 



STANDARD AND LANG'S PATENT LAY 

PRICE RICHT PROMPT SHIPMENTS 

ROPE FITTINGS 

ROPE GREASE 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, P.Q. 




No. 1202— Curling Cup 
E. G. GOODERHAM, Managing Director 



Trophies 
Prize Gups 
and Designs 

Suitable for 
Prizes for athle- 
tic competition, 
in Electro Silver 
Plate and Ster- 
ling Silver, are a 
specialty with us 
and Catalogue 
No. 20 illustrates 
same. 

If you have 
not received a 
copy write for it. 

The Toronto 
Silver Plate Go. 

West King Si. Toronto 
Canada 



Warnock Tools 



BEST IN THE WORLD 




\ The Jas. Warnock Co., Limited. Gait, ont. 




ii 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 




This design a guar- 
■ of quality. 



DO YOU PUBLISH A CATALOGUE ?] 



IF VOU DO VOU SHOULD USE 



All grades, from the highest "Glossy Finish" t 
rough "Antique" and bulky "Featherweight." 



"CANADIAN-MADE" PAPER 
o the 



VOl'R PR1NTFK CAN 
SUPPLY IT, 



Canada Paper Co. 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK Jf" 



'ENCE5 




WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO., Limited, 



-LONDON, ONT, 




ESTABLISHED 1867 

J. S LOUGHEAD & SON, Sarnia, Ont. 

Mfrs. of Hubs, Spokes, Buggy and Waggon Rims, Steigh Runners, 
Shafts and Poles, etc. 

We use nothing but the very best Hickory and 
Oak in our stock, and we are prepared to 
guarantee all of our goods. We carry an ex- 
ceedingly large stock on hand and will ship 
promptly. 

Your Order Solicited. 

Quebec Agent:— J. A. BERNARD, 
21 St. Peter St., Quebec, P.Q. 



Deal^s-- r "CLABROUGH" 

SHOT GUNS for next Season's Trade 



THEY SHOOT WELL ! 

THEY SELL WELL ! 

THE PROFITS ARE RIGHT ! 

Sole Manufacturers — 

J. P. CLABROUCH & JOHNSTONE 

WORKS— 
Price Street, BIRMINGHAM, ENC. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 




Capital and 8urplui, $1,500,000. Officei Throughout the Civilized World, 

Executive Officei: Hoi. 346 and 348 Broadway, Hew York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every Beeter o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information nc 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout th« 
civilised world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporation*,, 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA 

HALIFAX N B. HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. MONTREAL, QTTK. 

OTTAWA, ONT. QDKBEC, QCK. 

VAJfOOUVXK, B.O. 



BT. JOHN, N.B, 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



TORONTO, ONT. 



TWOS. C. IRVING, Gaa. lu. Western Cauda. Toroat*. 



MEND YOUR OWN BOOTS, 
HARNESS, ETC. 
"ALL-U-WANT." 





SOLE AOENTS 

AWL-U-WANT CO. 

79 East Front St. TORONTO 



SCISSORS AND POCKET CUTLERY 

HERBERT J. RODGERS 

of Saracen House, Snow Hill, London, E. C , Eng., 
visits Canada in March, representing Solingen 
makers of scissors, razors and pocket cutlery, etc. 
Newest lines, competitive prices. 
Appointments from jobbers will be valued. 



SWEAT PADS 

SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 

HORSE BLANttETS 

Balance of stock clearing at reduced prices. 

H. F. FALKINER 

58-60 CEORCE 8T , - TORONTO. 



H. G. EADIE 

22 St. John St., - Montreal 

Manufacturer's Agent, Hardware and Metal Merchant 

Representing Canadian. British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence Invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. Representing 
now 

LEEDS FIRE CLAY CO., Lt'd. 

Fire Bricks, Clazed Bricks, Stable Bricks. 

T. JO WITT & SONS, SHEFFIELD. 

Files, Cast Steel, Hammers, Crucible Steel Wire. 

JOS. FENTON & SONS, SHEFFIELD 

Cutlery and Plated Ware. 



Agent for 

Norway Iron, Steel, Calvanized Iron, Chains, 

Sheet Iron, Hoop Iron, Machinery 

Steel, PEN-DAR Metal Lockers. 



$2 



FOR THIS SMALL SUM THE 



$2 



MANUFACTURER-SUPPLY MERCHANT 

may keep posted on new openings 
for trade. 

TJl£ CANADIAN CONTRACT RECORD 

reports weekly all projected building and other 
construction works throughout Canada as well 
as new business enterprises. 



Send your name and address with 12 for 
a year's Subscription to 

Canadian Contract Record 

Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, and 
$2 Vancouver $2 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



12 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURINGS 



MONTREAL 



AND 



TORONTO 



LIMITED 



BARB WIRE «nd PLAIN GALVANIZEB WIRE 

BRIGHT AND GALVANIZED FENCE STAPLES 



WIRE NAILS 



FLAT HEAD 
ROUND and OVAL HEAD 



SCREWS 



BRIGHT— BRASS 
BRIGHT and BRASS 



TINNED WIRE for Mattress, Broom, Bottling and Binding 
STEEL WIRE BARREL HOOPS 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE 



ALL MADI 



IM CANADA 




CARRIACE 
SPRINGS & AXLES 



ANCHOR 
BRAND 




3ELA 




'1 



THE GUELPH SPRING & AXLE CO. 

LIMITED 

CUELPH, ONT. 



Side Lines 

If you want some man to carry 
your goods as a side line insert a 
condensed advertisement in Hard- 
ware and Metal. 

The cost is very small : 
2c. per word for first insertion 
1c. " " " subsequent issues 

Hardware and Metal is read by 
all the travellers calling on the 
hardware trade. 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



FURS ARE VALUABLE 



Don't allow your catch to escape because 
caught in a poor trap. 6ENUINE NEWHOUSE 
trap will hold the game and earn its extra 
cost several times in a season. 




Newhouse Steel Traps 

ARE ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 
Made Since 1848 by 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 



Write for Catalogue 



NIAGARA FALLS, Out. 



Established 1795 



JOHN SHAW & SONS 

Wolverhampton, Limited 



Branches at : 

. London, 

■ Calcutta, 
Melbourne, 
Valparaiso, Havana, 
Transvaal Colony, Etc 

i British Columbia. 



GENERAL HARDWARE AND 
METAL MERCHANTS 



Take pleasure in announcing to the 
trade that they have appointed 

J. H. ROPER 

their Canadian representative, and solicit 
a continuance of their esteemed favors. 



Canadian Office and Show Room 

82 St. Francois Xavier Street, - Montreal 

J. H. ROPER, Manager 

i 
i 



;, 



The Old Style Blanket at Night 




The Old Style in the 

Morning— Ready for the 

Rag Bag. 




REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

"Stay On" 

Made in 300 different 
styles, consisting of 

Summer 
Sheets 

in 

Linens Ducks 

Cottons Hessian 

and Jutes 

Winter 
Blankets 



Kerseys Wools 

Lined Ducks 
Lined Jutes 
Lined Linens 
Lined Hessians 

Rest made, best fitting, 

best wearing, and largest 

range of Horse Blankets 

on the Canadian market. 

See our Sweat Pad ad, 
next month. 



The "Stay-On" Blanket at Night. 




The Telford & Chapman Mfg. Co., 



Rock Island, Que. 



14 



January 13, 1906 

THIS IS THE 

OLD STAND-BY 

None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 
If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

NO. 233.-WILCOX TACKLE-BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 




' 



WILCOX IVIF"0. OO. OF" ONTARIO, L-imi-ted, London, Or»*. 



ATKINS SETS* SAWS 



ARE SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS IN MATERIAL, TKM- 
CROSS - CUT ^l~Y WW k3 PER, WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 
OUR VIOTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEQMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 




IJvffWtf 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., 

INCORPORATED 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. 

Canadian Branch : 56 King St. E., Toronto, Canada. 



Leading Manufacturers of HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND 
CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS of all kind* 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. 




Still 

Another 
New 
Revolver 

"H.&R. DOUBLE ACTION MODEL 1905" 

Small Frame— 32 Caliber 5 Shot 



Following the announcement of our Model "1904" we are now 
ready to supply this new revolver, conforming closely in frame and stock 
to the lines of our well known " H. & R. Premier." 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 



MODEL 
"1905" 




TKe FisHer 
Tube SKate 



H 




P 
L 


O 


y{W3t 


E 


C 


' fc^jD 


A 


K 




S 


E 


Jsm Jw 


u 


Y 


Tube Hockey/' W 


R 




5kate // fi| 


E 


STRO 


NG LIGHT 


NEAT 


Deal 


ers 





Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



Makers of 
H. & R. Single Guns 



Catalog: on Request 



Genuine pratts Astral Lamp Oil 

Sold in all countries and recognized as the highest grade oil manufactured. 
WHOLESALE ONLY 
THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY, Limited, - TORONTO, ONT. 

15 



DON'T .MISS BUSINESS. You may not 

have Stocked our skates. 

We have provided for the rush season. 

WE CARRY FULL LINK OF SHOES 
with our patent hook. We ean give mail orders 
quick despatch. 

Skates attached to shoes complete. 

When ordering state size of shoe usually 
worn. 

THE A. D. FISHER C0.,LiM 

34 Richmond Street East 
TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 




This ad. is worth 50c. 



5,000 REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE 

DIVINE'S RED DEVIL 
FAUCET WATER MOTOR 

Will grind an axe on 20 lbs. pressure. 

THREE TIMES THE POWER OF 
AHV OTHER FAUCET MOTOR 

Power for sewing machines, lathes, 
scroll saws and other small machines. 

For grinding edge tools and polish- 
ing silverware or other metals. 

1 s horse power on 80 lbs. pressure, 

attached to any faucet. 

Price, COMPLKTE, including- emery, huf- 
fing and pulley wheels, polishing 
composition, etc.. $4.00. 

$3'5<> and this ad. will get the motor 
complete. 

DISCOUNT TO THE TRADE. 

Divine Water Motor Co. 

296 Broadway, New York 

ALLEN C. JENKINC & CO., 

Room 215 Cotistme Bldg .. MONTREAL. 
Stock carried in Montreal. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc Cold Punched Nnti of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



HA VE YOU A CLERK 

that is showing special interest in the progress of your business ? Don't you 
think it would be a good idea to present him with a copy of 

HARDWARE and METAL 

this year? It would make him still more valuable. Don't you think so ? Extra 
subscriptions only cost $1.50 a year. 



GET PRICES FOR 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

aOKNOWLEDSED THI BIST 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 




NEW YORK OPPICB. '■• Chamber! St 

NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY TJKQTJBSTIONED." 

Each pair of our shears bears tfc" above trade mark. 



|SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 




Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS' 
ur.d TAILORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company 

WIEBUSCH & HILOER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sola Agents 

16 



GILBER^SONX^ 

comeT"^ 

Brand 

GALVANIZED FLAT SHEETS 

for any purpose where the best is needed. Wide awake 
jobbers handle this brand. They are well galvanized, 
true to gauge and especially soft tor working up purposes. 
Every sheet bears the name " Gilbertson." That is a 
guarantee. 

MAKERS: 

W. GILBERTSON & CO., Limited. 

PONTARDAWE, SOUTH WALES. 

Bolton, Fane & Go. 

98 Leadenhall Street, London, E.C., Eng. 

TINPLATES 

In all qualities and sizes 

Bessemer Coke ... " Lofoden " Brand 
8elmen8 Coke - "Pelican" Brand 

Charcoal .... "Mocha" Brand 
Best Charcoal - - " Cardigan " Crown Brand 

Staffordshire Bar Iron ■ - B.G. Crown Brand 

Calvanlzed Sheets "Pelican" and "Ostrich" Brand 

Boiler Plates, Ralls, Fishplates, &c, &c. 
R. SULLIVAN DAVID 

Selling Agent for Canada, 210 St. James St., MONTREAL 

TELEPHONE. MAIN 3389 




mm 

the CANADA METAL CO. 

TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



Maple Leaf 

Stitched Cotton Duck 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co. Ltd, 

Hamilton! Canada 






January 13. 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HOTEL DIRECTORY. 



WINDSOR HOTEL, StfJ&T 

This House ia pleasantly and conveniently located on the East Side 01 
Queen Street. The roomi are bright and cheerful. Every attention paid 
to guests. Billiards and pool. Hot and cold water baths. A. MoNicol, Prop. 

TOWER HOTEL, GE0R b^S n u d u^n e a rara - 

Thi» tirst-i'lass hotel ia most conveniently situated in the coolest and healthiest 
dart of the city. Fire minutes from railway station and steamer stallings, and 
near to all prinolpal public buildings. Cool and lofty bedrooms. Spacious Dining 
and Laities' Rooms. Billiard Koom. Electric light throughout. 

VICTORIA LODGE 

Mrs. J. F. SMITH, Proprietor. HAMILTON, BERMUDA 

Opposite Victoria Park and Cedar Ave. Private board $12 to $14 per week. 

BOARD AND ROOM 

"THE ARGYLE," 



Mrs. FRASER 

Terms moderate. 



Cedar Avenue, HAMILTON, BERMUDA 
Also furnished cottages. 



THE AMERICAN HOUSE 



A. PASCHAL (Prop.) 

Centrally located. 



HAMILTON, BERMUDA 
Open all the year round. 



WOODSIDE BOARDING HOUSE 

(Cornir or Maik and T.amaha Streets, GEORGETOWN, DEMERARA.) 

Cool and airy Bedrooms, Excellent Cuisine, Attendance Qualified. Term° 

Moderate. Electric Car Loop at gate of premises. Patronage Solicited. Manageress 

E. COTTAM. 

WINTER RESORT- Queen's Park Hotel 

PORT OF SPAIN, TRINIDAD, B.W.I. 

John McBwen, Manager. For Rates, etc.. apply Trinidad Shipping & Trading Go. 
29 Broadway, New York. 

THE GRAND UNION 

The most popular hotel in 
OTTAWA, ONTARIO. James K. Paisley, Prop. 

DOMINION HOUSE 

W. H. Durham, Proprietor. RENFREW, ONTARIO 

The most popular Hotel in the Ottawa Valley. 



THE TELEPHONE 



Is a companion, friend and servant combined. 
Invaluable for convenience in the household. 

LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE SERVICE 

Has no equal for the facility it affords in business life. 
Full particulars as to rates and service at the near- 
est office of 

THE BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY OF CANADA 




WE HAVE EVERY FACILITY TO TRANSACT 
YOUR BANKING BUSINESS 

AND INVITE YOUR ACCOUNT 

THE METROPOLITAN BANK. 



CAPITAL PAID UP, 
RESERVE FUND, 



$1,000,000. 
1,000,000. 



SAVINGS DEPARTMENT at all branches 

Interest allowed on deposits of 
one dollar and upwards 



w 



ESTERN 



Incorporated 

1851 



ASSURANCfc 
• • COMPANY. 



FIRE 
AND 



MARINE 



Head Office Capital 

Toronto, Assets, over - 
Otlt. Annual Income 



$1,500,000.00 
3.300,00000 
3.890.000.00 

HON. GEO. A. COX. President. 

J. J. KENNY, Vice-President and Man. Director. 

C. C. FOSTER, Secretary. 



Money 

CAN BE SAVED BY MEANS 
OF AN ENDOWMENT POLICY. 

YOU CAN ONLY SECURE 
SUCH A POLICY WHILE YOU 
ARE IN GOOD HEALTH. 




Pamphlets and Full Particulars regarding: the 

New Accumulation Endowment Policy 

sent on application. 



Confederation Life 



ASSOCIATION 



W. H. BEATTY. President. 
W. C. MACDONALD, J. K. MACDONALD, 



MANAGING DIRECTOR. 



HEAD OFFICE, 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



BRITISH AMERICA 
ASSURANCE COMP'Y 

FIRE AND MARINE. 

Incorporated 1833 

CASH CAPITAL, 8850,000.00. 
TOTAL ASSETS, 12,043,678.59. 
LOSSES PAID SINCE ORGANIZATION, $25,868,544.80. 
HEAD OFPICE, - BRITISH AMERICA BUILDING. 
Cor. Front and Scott Sts., Toronto. 

HON. GEO. A. COX, President. J. J KENNY, Vice-President 
P. H. SIM8, Secretary. and Managing Director 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



This list li (or th* purpo** of placing ratalUr*. 
asanufacturara' Jobbars ami other raadars in 
touch with raliabla and compttHl aooountanta 
and auditor* who** ■•rrio** ara *o fraquantLy 
raquirad for iuoh purpo*** u op*nin| book*, 


Leading Canadian 
Accountants and Auditors 


adjusting and auditing aoeount*, amnting part- 
narahlpa or organising joint nook oompanl**, 
darning *p*oial offlo* *yit*ma, making oollao- 
tion* and investigation*, handling astataa, mak- 
ing raluationi, *tc. 


This space $30.00 per year. 


This space $15.00 per year. 


JENKINS * HARDY, 
Aaalgneei, Chartarad Accountant*, 
Estate and Fir* Insurant* Ag*nl*. 

16K Toronto Strvat, Toronto. 
12 Canada Lift- Building. Montreal. 

100 William Street, New York. 



Bits Hit 1* for the purpose of placing manuf ao- 
lur*r*, wholesale and retail merchant* and other 
readers throughout Canada, and Sniii abroad 
doing business in Canada, in touch with th* 
legal prof easion throughout th* Dominion, for 
the eolleotlon of aooounta, legal r*pr***ntation, 


LEGAL CARDS. 


organisation of oompan lea, th* arrangement or 
dissolution of partnerships, or assignments, as 
well as all other matters of a legal nature 

For advertising rates apply to MaoLean Pub- 
lishing 0*., Limited, Montreal or Toreato. 


TTJPPKR, PHIPPKN A TDPPKR, 
Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 

Winnipeg, Canada. 


ATWATER, DUOLOS * OHAUVIN 

Advocates. Montreal. 
Albert W. Atwater, K. C. Consulting 
Counsel for City of Montreal. Ohas. 
A. Duolos. Henry N. Ohauvin. 


BKATTY, BLACKSTOOK, FASKEN, RIDDELL k MABEE 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

Offices, Bank of Toronto. 

Tel. Main 3813. Toronto, Ont. 


IRWIN A JONES, Barristers, etc. 
H K Irwin, K.C., Clerk of the Peace, 
County of York ; B. Morton Jones, 
B C L. ; Solicitors for Equity Fire Insur- 
ance Co., Berlin Fire Insurance Co. 
14 King St. W., Toronto. Weston, Ont. 


W. G. WILSON 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Convey- 
ancer, etc. 
Napanee, Ont. 


MEWBURN & AMBROSE 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

S. 0. Mew-burn, E. H. Ambrose, 

Hamilton, Ont. 


WM. A MoLEAN 

Barrister. Solicitor, Etc. 

Head Office, Guelph, McLean's Block. 

Branch Office, Aoton, Town Hall. 

Corporation Solicitor, Etc 


ROBINSON & GREEN 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 

Johk A. Robinson. John R. Green. 

Solicitors for the Imperial Bank of 

Canada, the Southern Loan & Sayings 

Co.. St. Thomas, Out. 


LOUGHEED & BENNETT, 
Barristers, Solicitors, Advocates, etc. 
Calgary, Can. Cables: Lougheed, Calgary 
Solicitors for : Bank of Montreal. Cana- 
dian Bank of Commerce, Bank of Nova 
Sootia, Merchants' Bank of Canada. 


This space $30 per year. 



ALCOHOLISM 



The best 

treatment 

for all per- 

sons a <" - 

fected with the disease of drunkenness, is known only to 



DR. MacKAY, Address City Hall, Montreal, Que. 

Absolutely private treatment. 



The Belleville Business College, Limited 

Business firms get the Ijest results by applying to us 10 days before vacancies 
occur in their employ. 

See Catalogue pages 21, 27, 33, 41. 



J. A. Tousaw 

Secretary 



•} 



BELLEVILLE 
ONTARIO 



' { 



J. Frith Jeffers, M.A. 

President. 



\ CeirtloaeB:- 

*■*. '* 

SSSB. tM be* to ess 


*> 

ire in recefft o 
ore too that toe 


f four lator of th. 2»d Inntant 
■atter referred to tail "• tw«l*« 


^K si .trictVj « 


nfidenllal. 




PH**f Toe seieral otter natters 


treated id joor conme.lcalton will 


|^^Hk feceiee our careful attention. 


Verj truly «*■*• 






^^ff* *Va*si ~~ 



THE 



wm»m 



■te U 



UNDERWOOD 



The Writing-in^ 
Sight Typewriter 

Will do your work 25% 
to 50% faster than any 
other writing machine. 
Highest award "Grand 
Prize," St. Louis Ex- 
position, 1904. 



UNITED TYPEWRITER CO., LIMITED 



7 ADELAIDE STREET EAST, 
TORONTO 



99 ST. FRANCIS XAVIER STREET, 



and at 



MONTREAL 



HAMILTON LONDON OTTAWA QUEBEC 8T. JOHN, N.B. 
aJha*a»^aTav*a*a*T«*»a*a till *a.*»e*»**j*as*.« ii h»i.»» i a » s ii» > I i * a a ■ a i | n 



■ a..* «. s s> *■ 



18 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Double the Price 



^eg^ZZ 



couldn't buy a better article than 

BRANT-LAC 



a Varnish Wood Stain 



BRANT-LAC is a record labor-saver and money- 
saver. For renewing Old Furniture, Woodwork, Floors, 
etc., it has no equal. 

To be had in all sized packages and in the following 
colors : Light Oak, Walnut, Light Mahogany, Dark 
Mahogany, Cherry Fruit, Black, Green, Delft Blue and 
Natural. 

Push BRANT-LAC. A profitable trade awaits you. 




SCARF E & CO. 

Manufacturers of Fine Varnishes, etc. 
BRANTFORD, CANADA 

THOMAS BLACK, Lom 7 b 6 ar 8 t f 8 ... Winnipeg, Man. 



BATH 


<fc TUR fl 


ROOM 


wr 22 ™m~~ 


FIXTURES 


v^^^/H^^^ 




cM^^M^^-^ 


-Os 


\v~ l/^ 


jjp 


11 


Made by 

THE 


jJLJL 


^^^» ^_^^ ^ . _^^^^tow^r 


Catalog B Shows 


CARRIAGE 


TOWEL BARS 


MOUHTINGS 


SOAP DISHES 

SPONGE BASKETS 


CO., LTD. 


ROBE HOOKS 

PAPER FIXTURES 


TORONTO 


&c. &c. 
Write for it. 



It Merits Your Interest 

You have a right to be interested in MAXimum LIGHT GLASS, not because we are the Sole 
Canadian Agents for it, but because the dictates of business demand such. 

You know well that 

MAXimum LIGHT 

GLA SS 

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Sole Canadian Agents 



THE HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., Limited, LONDON, ONT. 

Class Importers and Manufacturers. 



19 



a 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

DOMINION 



January 13, 190G 



99 



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MANUFACTURERS 

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SECTIONAL VIEW OF BOTTOM 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO 



l THE KEMP MFG. CO. OF MONTREAL 
t 58 McCill St., Montreal, Que. 



THE KEMP MFG. AND METAL CO., Limited 

McDermot Ave. East, Winnipeg, Man. 



io 



January 13, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 



INVESTIGATION INTO TACK ASSOCIATION. 



The minutes of the Canada Tack Man- 
ufacturers' Association were further 
examined by Mr. Curry in the Police 
Court in Toronto last Monday. 

Mr. Curry inquired from Mr. Frame, 
the clerk in the employ of Messrs. Jen- 
kins & Hardy, as to the contents of 
some papers which he produced, and 
they were identified as the pool per- 
centages from January, 1899, to July, 
L905. Mr. Frame also stated that an- 
other paper produced was a list of the 
payments to and from the pool from 
January, 1899, to May, 1903. Mr. Curry 
then questioned the witness as to an 
entry in the minutes referring to a pay- 
ment made by W. T. Woodall to the as- 
sociation. Mr. Frame said that Mr. 
Woodall had received more from the 
pool than he was entitled to and had to 
refund it. He received two amounts of 
$1,000 and $1,200 which were not due. 

Mr. Tilley, counsel for defendants, 
stated that these sums were allowances 
made on goods lie had bought, from an- 
i member of the association. 

In 1899 it was resolved to raise the 
pool tax paid by members to 25 per 
cent, instead of 20 per cent. 

On January 4,-1900, it was resolved 
that in consequence of the death of 
Mr. Jenkins, Mr. Hardv be appointed 
treasurer. 

On October 6, 1899, the net extra was 
advanced from '_" to 5 per cent. Ques- 
tioned as to the meaning; of this Mr. 
Frame said that for extra work there 
was an extra price. "What is extra 
work ?" asked Mr. Curry, the reply be- 
ing, "Galvanizing." 

This minute was agreed to by the 
I'illow-Hersey Company, Ontario Tack 
Company, Peck-Benny Company, Mont- 
real Roiling Mills arid W. T. Woodall. 

How Pool System Worked. 

On October 9, 1899, the minute re- 
garding pool tax of 25 ner cent, was 
amended, the words "on all deliveries" 
being inserted after the words "pool 
tax." 

Mr. Curry again questioned Frame 
about this 25 per cent. 

Mr. Frame said it was 25 per cent, of 
the amount that any member sold above 
the amount lie was required to sell by 
the association. 

Magistrate Denison : "So that if a 
man had noL sold what he was required 
to sell he would receive 25 per cent, on 
what, he had not sold ?" 

At this point Mr. Tilley conferred for 
a few moments with the magistrate 
about an item in the papers mentioned 
earlier of $3,000,000 which were stated 
to be sales by the Montreal Rolling 
Mills. The item was not discussed fur- 
ther. 

It was resolved to deprive \V. T. 
Woodall of his pool tax, viz.. bo cancel 
the usual allowance made on sales be- 
tween members.; This refers to the poo] 
tax which was deducted from the in- 
voice of any member buying from in- 
other member. 

This resolution was shortly afterwards 
cancelled. 



In January, 1900, il was resolved to 
in. ike St. John, WIS., an F.O.B. point 
in compliance with the request of a firm 
at that point. F.O.B. was stated in the 
minutes to mean the delivery in any 
store or warehouse al the F.O.B. point 
of delivery. 

Mr. Curry : "Is that delivery to man 
ufacturer or purchaser ?" 

\li . Ki .line : "Purchaser." 

Mr. Curry here put, in as evidence cir- 
cular 230, '"A," "B," "C," "D," "E," 
"F," "C" and "H," which he did not- 
read aloud. 

It was resolved at this time to de- 
prive W. T. Woodall of the pool reduc- 
tion for his purchases. His resignation, 
which had apparently been pending, was 
withdrawn. 

Mr. Curry : "The effect of the above 
resolution is that Woodall is not allow- 
ed 25 per cent, on his purchases from 
other members. That 25 per cent, is 
paid into the pool by the others." 

Mr. .Frame : "The effect is the same 
as if he did receive the 25 per cent, off 
his invoice." 

"When members of the association sent 
in a declaration to the secretary that 
they had not bought from those not in 
the association or imported goods on 
their own account, a cheque was sent 
them for 4.37 per cent, of the total 
amount of the sales." 

Shoe Manufacturers Favored. 

It was resolved that shoe manufactur- 
er's or shoe tinders buying goods to the 
value of $1,(100 from the association be 
entitled to an extra 2-k per cent, dis- 
count. 

On January 16, 1900, it was resolved 
that the special price of $1.75 to Ashei 
& Leeson and other firms be no longer 
in force. The reason for this, Mr. Tilley 
said, was that prices had so frequently 
been changed since that price was first 
instituted. 

Mr. Curry questioned Mr. Frame as to 
the exact standing of W. T. Woodall 
with regard to the association. 

Mr. Frame :• "He received trade dis- 
count only and also 12| per cent, which 
was allowed to shoe finders." 

It appears that Mr. Woodall did not 
manufacture very largely and so had to 
buy extensively from other members of 
the .association. Hence disputes seem 
to have frequently arisen. 

Arrangements With Jobbers. 

At this meeting a letter was read 
from Thorne & Smith, members of tin- 
Maritime Hardware Association, saying 
that the members of the Maritime Hard- 
ware Association would be loyal to the 
association. 

Mr. Curry : "What arrangement has 
the Canada Hardware Association with 
the combine ?" 

Mr. Frame : "None that I know of." 

Mr Curry: "I think its members are 
on the association's hardware list, are 
the] not •'" 

Mi Frame : "They can buy irrespec- 
t ive "f li 

Mr. Woodall agreed to pay pool tax to 

21 



the association and to refund to Mont- 
real Rolling Mills and the PilloW-Hi 
Company what was allowed him m No- 
vember and December, 1900, by them. 

Col. Denison : "I le had bo pay it 
back." 

fil Curry : "So he did not gel benefit 
of it, ■'" 

Mr. Frame : "No1 according to that." 
It was moved that pool be adjusted, 

leaving out Woodall. The percent 

Woodall was to he divided between the 
members. The ;e< i. i.ny was to send no- 
tice to all the members how pool had 
been adjusted. 

It was resolved that a loyalty pre- 
mium be paid to purchasers of $400 in 
the Maritime Provinces, and that no 
member was to place special shoe tacks 
on the market unless listed by the as- 
sociation. 

Meeting Outside Competition. 

At a meeting on April 11, 1900, it 
was resolved that tin- secretary write to 
the Ontario Tack Company, Hamilton, 
tli. if the price must be to meet the 
competition of one, Kerrigan, who 
was selling the Atlas tack. 

Mr. Curry : "Who was Kerrigan ?" 

Mr. Frame : "He was a dealer at Lou- 
don." 

Mr. Curry : "What is the Atlas tack'"' 

Mr. Frame : "A tack made in the 
United States." 

Air. Curry : "There appears to have 
been some communication passing be- 
tween the Montreal Rolling Mills and 
Ontario Tack Company about this." 

Mr. Frame : "There" is nothing to 
show that there was." 

Circular 262, "A,"" "B," "C," "D," 
"E," were put in as evidence. 

Air. Curry stated that in Julv I'lim, 
three members of the association could 
not depute one of their members to buy 
for all three arid receive the discount cri 
his purchases, which he would then di- 
vide between himself and the other two. 

A letter was read from Pender & Co., 
who had resigned from the association. 

Mr. Curry : "They were out of the as- 
sociation, according to their own state- 
ment, in 1895." 

Mr. Tilley : "They remained in for 
shoe tacks only." 

The secretary was instructed to re- 
turn Pender & Company their $50 de- 
posit. 

It was resolved that copper truck 
tacks he sold same as tin truck tacks, 
same not to be stated on lists. 

At this time the pool tax was re- 
duced to 17* per cent. 

Special Trade Discounts. 

The I.C.R. received 12>, 1\ and 5 per 
cent, off face of their invoices and the 
special trade discount. 

Mr. Tilley : "This was a contract." 

The Grand Trunk, Canada Pacific, 
Canada Atlantic, and Michigan Central 
also received 12A, 2\ and ."> per cent, 
discount irrespective of whether they 
bought from those outside the associa 
linn or not. 

The Pillow-Hersey Company were au- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



thorized to soil special Hungarian nails 

at same price as hob nails, viz., 58c. 

It was resolved that shoe tacks made 
lighter than standard weight (weighing 
instead of 3 02. ) should he labelled 
and sold accordingly. 
Mr Currj . "Do you know that mein- 
Of the association made special 
goods to be sold at special prices '" 
Mr. Frame : "No." 

New Shoe Machinery. 

A new last inc. machine came into use 
about this time, so the association (ac- 
cording to the minutes) arranged a spe- 
cial price for lasting tacks and placed 
the Amherst Hoot & Shoe Company on 
a special footing with regard to the 
association in this article. 

In October, 1900, it was resolved that 
the discount of! upholstery tacks be 85, 
12\. 12^, 2£ and 5 per cent, off face of 
invoice. 

Col. Denison : "They must have made 
a mistake." 

It was resolved tnat no shipment could 
be stopped in transit by customer or 
shipper under the penalty of a fine, un- 
less freight was paid from nearest F.O. 
B. point, and that the resolution refer- 
ring to purchasers of $100 shoe finder- 
goods be cancelled. 

Ames, Holden & Co. and several other 
firms in Fredericton, Amherst, Montreal 
and Quebec were mentioned who received 
a special price on account of their use 
of a particular kind of United States 
machine. 

Fines Not Enforced. 

It was admitted by Mr. Curry that 
according to the minutes up to the pre- 
sent no member had been compelled to 
pay a fine. Resolutions were usually 
passed relieving the secretary of 'the ne- 
cessitv of imposing the fine. 

Mr. Curry : "We shall see what the 
books say." 

Col. Denison : "Why were fines not 
paid ?" 

Mr. Tilley : "All members agreed that 
penalties should not be enforced." 

The Quantity Rebate. 

The quant itv rebate was settled for 
purchasers as follows : $200 at 7±, $400 
at 12|, $100 at 12^ and 2-J-. for Ontario, 
Quebec, Manitoba, British Columbia and 
Northwest Territories. 

When jobbers showed that they had 
fulfilled agreement, they received cheque 
from secretary of 5 per cent, everywhere 
except in the "Maritime Provinces, where 
they received 7i per cent. 

Mr. Curry : "Why do the Maritime 
Provinces get more ?" 

Mr. Frame : "I don't know." 

Mr. Curry : "I suppose there are more 
opportunities there for buying outside 
the combine ?" 

Mr. Frame: "I didn't know of any." 

A special price was arranged on Jan- 
uary 14, 1901, for the sale of shoe nails 
to the firms using the Mayo Lightning 
Heeler. 

In Februarv 1901, it was resolved 
that the discount of G5 per cent, was to 
apply to everything except bulk goods. 

On March 28, 1901, Hecs & Son ap- 
plied to be placed on the special 12^. pel 
cent, discount list. 

Mr. Curry : "Do you remember if they 
were placed on the list ?" 

Mr. Frame : "No." 

The Portland Rolling Mills applied at 
this time to be admitted into the asso- 
ciation. 



Special Arrangements Made. 

It was resolved that the Ontario Tack 
Company, in competition with Gwynn &i 
Company, of Hamilton, even though they 
sold below association prices to meet 
this competition, must pay the pool tax 
a I the same rate as if they had been 
selling at the higher association price. 

Mr. Near, representing the Pillow-Her- 
sej Company, and Mr. Kinghorne, on be- 
half of the Montreal Rolling Mills Co., 
agreed to pay Mr. Woodall the loyalty 
premium on the sales of rivets made in 
1900. 
Mr. Curry : "Why was this ?" 
Mr. Frame : "I don't remember." 
It was resolved at this time that sales 
on the part of members to Mr. Woodall 
should be subject to the trade discount 
plus 12£ per cent., plus 74 per cent., and 
no other allowance was to be made him. 

Declaration Required. 

In June, 1900, the Montreal Rolling 
Mills and other members of the associa- 
tion allowed to Mr. Ashdown, a Winni- 
peg jobber, the special loyalty discount 
of 12^ per cent. 

The secretary was instructed to write 
to those who had allowed him this dis- 
count. 

Questioned as to the reason of this, 
Mr. Frame said that Ashdown had not 
filed the declaration that he had not 
bought from firms outside the combine 
which was required by the association 
before the loyaltv discount was allowed. 

Mr. Curry : "They allowed it incor- 
rectly ?" 

Mr. Frame : "That is all I know." 

The following are the prices of machine 
lasting tacks mentioned in the minutes 
of the association at this date : \, 19c ; 
a 18c; 1, 12f c ; H, 12c; 1J, ll£c ; 
2, lie. All these prices show a reduc- 
tion except that of the f tack. 

It was resolved that no action be 
taken in reference to regulating the 
present facilities of members for mak- 
ing tacks. 

Mr. Curry : "This was subsequently 
done." 

Mr. Tilley : "No." 

Preferred Buyers. 

In July, 1901, the Intercolonial Rail- 
way Co. was quoted 12i. 2£ and 7J per 
cent, over and above the usual retail 
discount, subject to the Intercolonial 
Railway Co.'s terms of payment. This 
ruling was made by Mr. Hardy. 

Mr. Tilley : "This was a contract for 
the year, the price being fixed at a cer- 
tain rate." 

In connection with this it was ruled 
that the above special prices must not 
be quoted through any jobber, but to the 
I.C.R. direct. 

Mr. Curry : "This was no honest ten- 
der." 

Mr. Tilley contended that it was an 
honest tender, saying that all the manu- 
facturers tendered, no one tendering 
high. 

Mr. Curry : "In that case there was 
no competition." 

Mr. Tilley : "Mr. Curry is endeavor- 
ing to mix this up with other cases." 

Col. Denison : "There is a difference." 

At this time Hees & Co., who applied 
before to he placed on the preference 
list, were placed on. 

Reference was again made to the com- 
petition of the Atlas Tack Co. 

The base discount of shoe points was 
arranged at 50 per cent, and of trunk 
cap nails at 25 per cent. 

n 



It was resolved that members should 
not make any allowance for goods re- 
turned after three months unless they 
were shipped in error. Also that the 
secretary be the only one to advise 
members of resolution about certificates 
of loyalty. 

Firms Added to List. 

The L. McBrayne Company, Berlin, 
who were put off the special hardware 
list, were again placed on that list and 
entitled to 12^ per cent, discount. This 
took place on January 16, 1902. 

Mr. Frame said that he did not re- 
member the reason of this. 

In April, 1902, it was resolved that 
there should be no special price for the 
Yukon Territory, and also that there 
should be no loyalty discount to pur- 
chasers of zinc glaziers' points. In May, 
1902, J. Fennell & Son, Berlin, were 
added to the list. 

The discount for zinc glaziers' points 
was fixed at 15 per cent. In July, 1902, 
it was agreed that the resolution abol- 
ishing the loyalty premium on glaziers' 
points be cancelled. At this time the 
association were requested by Mr. Wood- 
all to list shoe tacks in bulk. 

In 1903 the Peck Rolling Mills Co. 
filed their agreement with the associa- 
tion and the Peck-Benny Co. assigned 
all right to the deposit in the funds of 
the association. 

It was again noticed that the loyalty 
discount in the Maritime Provinces was 
Ih per cent, as against that of 5 per 
cent, in all other provinces. 

Buying from Other Members. 

In March, 1903, it was resolved that 
if one member sold to another the pur- 
chaser was to be allowed the maximum 
discount, the loyalty premium, the pool 
tax and 5 per cent, profit in addition for 
doing business. The explanation of this 
resolution was stated to be that if any- 
one bought from a brother manufacturer 
he had to pay the percentage on the sale 
into the pool. 

Mr. Tilley held that this was no indi- 
cation whatever of what the profit on 
the sale might be. 

It was agreed at this time that G-. H. 
Hees might be sold window tacks at a 
special price. 

With reference to the Massey-Harris 
Co., prices were left to the Ontario Tack 
Co. and the Montreal Rolling Mills Co. 
with power to act. 

Mr. Curry : "Why was this ?" 

Mr. Frame : "I don't remember." 

Mr. Curry : "Was it because they re- 
fused to buy from Jenkins & Hardy's 
quotations ?" 

Mr. Frame : "No." 

Mr. Curry : "Were they permitted to 
quote because the Massey-Harris Co. 
refused to buy from the association ?" 

Mr. Frame : "I do not remember the 
nature of the matter." 

Discounts on Any Quantity. 

In September, 1903, it was resolved 
that a dealer named Nowell be placed on 
the 124 per cent, hardware list irrespec- 
tive of the quantity he misrht buy, thus 
giving him special treatment, and it 
was also resolved that others may be 
treated in the same way if the secretary 
is satisfied that they have to meet the 
competition of those not in the associa- 
tion. In October, 1903, Young, of Que- 
bec, and Doyle, of the same city, were 
also placed on the preferred hardware 
list. 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



• It was decided at this Lime that nu 
pool tax was to be paid on tacks sold 
to the Massey-Harris Co. 

The extra discount of 7i per cent, to 
the Maritime Provinces being again men- 
tioned in the minutes, Mr. Curry re- 
marked that apparently it cost more to 
make them loyal to the association. 

He also questioned Mr. Frame as to 
whether the United Shoe Machinery Co. 
ever became members of the association. 

Mr. Frame : "There is a dispute about 
it." 

Mr. Woodall's name again appeared in 
the minutes in connection with discounts 
and Mr. Curry inquired the reason of the 
constant disputes that there appear to 
have been with this member of the as- 
sociation. 

Mr. Tilley said that Woodall more 
than any other member of the associa- 
tion found it necessary to buy from 
other members of the association as he 
was a small manufacturer. 

At the time of the Toronto fire it 
was resolved that those affected by this 
fire should be allowed two months extra 
time in the settlement of their accounts. 
II. S. Howland & Sons were stated to 
be the only firm affected by the fire. 

The investigation was adjourned until 
Tuesday. 

Tuesday's Session. 

It was resolved that the fine imposed' 
on the Peck Rolling Mills be reduced to 
$1. 

Mr. Curry : "What was the original 
fine ?" 

This question was not answered. 

Magistrate Denison : "Where are the 
records of the fines imposed ?" 

Mr. Frame : "In the letter book." 

It was resolved that purchases by shoe 
finders of Swede nails shall count for 
quantity discount but not for loyalty. 

The price of iron shoe nails was fixed 
at 13c per lb. less 6,0 and 12^ per cent., 
and this price was to be subject to the 
loyalty premium. 

In November, 1904, the United Shoe 
Machinery Company wrote a letter to 
the association requesting that St. Hya- 
cinthe be made an F.O.B. point of de- 
livery. 

The United Shoe Machinery Company 
were informed that if they wished goods 
to be delivered to St. Hyacinthe F.O.B. 
they must bill them separately. 

Mr Curry : "Why was this ? Was it 
to prevent the purchaser from having the 
advantage of the freight reing paid ?" 

Mr. Tilley : "The shipper had to pay." 

The members of the association agreed 
to inform the secretary of any breach of 
any association rules as regards price 
instead of attempting to combat it 
themselves. This agreement was signed 
by the representatives of all the com- 
panies. 

The secretary was authorized to inter- 
\ iew the Portland Rolling Mills and get 
them to sign the association agreement 
and make the deposit. On January 9, 
1905, the Portland Rolling Mills were 
once more admitted into +116 combine. 

Favors to Shoe Men Cancelled. 

It was resolved at this meeting to 
cancel the quantity and loyalty discount 
1o shoe manufacturers and shoe finders. 
It was also resolved that shoe finders' 
prices be printed in the hardware lists 
of the association. 

The United Shoe Machinery Co. at 
this time agreed to maintain the price 
of shoe tacks, shoe nails, and Swede 



tacks ; that they would make no allow- 
ances to purchasers affecting the price 
of tacks, and that in case of their vio- 
lation of this agreement they would al- 
low Messrs. Jenkins & Hardy to make 
the terms of settlement and fix the 
penalty. 

Mr. Curry : "What did they agree Jen- 
kins & Hardy could do ?" 

Mr. Frame : "I don't know." 

Mi. Curry : "Is something left out 
here ?" 

Mr. Frame : "Yes." 

Mr. Curry left the court to try and 
And the information which had been left 
out of the minutes. Mr. Frame said 
that the missing paper was most likely 
attached to the copy of the minutes. 

Mr. Curry : "How many companies 
does the United Shoe Manufacturers' 
Co. represent ?" 

Mr. Frame : "I do not know." 

A ruling was made altering the min- 
utes and fixing the rebate for some 
items on the shoe finders' lists at 5 and 
12^ per cent. Other items were to be 
quoted net. At this time in order to 
meet competition from England special 
arrangements were made. 

Mr. Curry asked Mr. Frame to see if 
he could find the price of shoe rivets. 

The secretary reported that he had in- 
terviewed the Portland Rolling Mills 
and that they had refused to make the 
required deposit in the fund of the asso-. 
ciation, but had agreed to maintain the 
price. Upon this the Portland Rolling 
Mills were admitted. They promised to 
give thirty days' notice of retirement. 

New F. 0. B. Points. 

A special arrangement was made for 
the benefit of Messrs. Underhill & 1 Sis- 
man, Aurora, making Aurora an F.O.B. 
point for goods supplied to them. This 
was asserted to be a special arrange- 
ment. 

At this time Quebec was made an F. 
O. B. point of delivery but not an 
equalization point. This was explained 
earlier in the case. It was also decided 
to carry stocks at Quebec. 

Maritime Premium Reduced. 

The premium to the Maritime Pro- 
vinces was reduced to 5 per cent, from 
7i per cent. 

The association decided to allow 
Messrs. McLennan, McFeelv & Co., of 
Vancouver, the loyalty premium even 
though they boughV some of their goods 
in San Francisco. This was done with 
the object of inducing them not to buy 
altogether in the United States. 

In July, 1905, the pool percentages 
were as follows : Montreal Rolling 
Mills, 36.25 ; Pillow-Hersev Co., 25.25 ; 
Peck Rolling Mills, 14 ; Ontario Tack 
Company, 16.50 ; W. T. Woodall, 8. 

A letter was read at this Julv meet- 
ing from the United Shoe Machinery Co. 
with reference to the Bazin Manufactur- 
ing Co. 

Special prices were arranged in Brit- 
ish Columbia for Hungarian nails. 

The price of shoe finders' nails at this 
time was $14 per 100 lbs., less 40 per 
cent, and 10 per cent. 

The price of shade tacks was fixed at 
7ic F.O.B. Toronto, less 2 per cent, in 
30 days. In November, 1905, soft steel 
shoe nails were advanced in price 25c 
per cwt. 

The minutes of the association con- 
cluded at this point, and Mr. Curry be- 

23 



his examination of the letter books 
ot the association. 

Letter Books Examined. 

A letter was read under date Septem- 
bei 11, 1892, to the effect that Mr. Rob 
ert Jenkins and Thos. Jenkins were 
secretaries and would both sign "H. & 
T. Jenkins." 

In March, 1903, a letter was written 
to the Pillow-Hersey Co. by the secre- 
taries saying that they had violated the 
association agreement in their dealings 
with the Grand Trunk Railway and were 
liable to a penalty of $300. The secre- 
tary inquired if they desired to appeal 
from his decision, and said that there 
seemed to him to be extenuating circunir 
stances in connection with this particu- 
lar case, so that it should be left over 
to the next general meeting to decide. 

The secretary also wrote to Peck, 
Benny & Co. about this matter and in- 
formed them that he had investigated 
the charge against the Pillow-Hersey 
'Company of allowing the Grand Tmok 
60, 1 2 A and 5 per cent, and that he had 
informed them that they were liable to 
a penalty of $300. He stated that he 
thought the sale was made under a mis- 
apprehension, the price being the same 
as that charged to those on the prefer- 
red list. 

A letter was written to the Ontario 
Tack Company, Hamilton, dated April 
19, 1892, saying that a letter had been 
received from Messrs. Foster & Son, 
St. John, N.B., joining the association, 
and also that Dixon, of Toronto, had 
declined to be placed on the list. 

It was stated that the original letters 
received by the association had been 
burned down to 1897. 

The letters which were read were a 
recapitulation of what was contained in 
the minutes, with a few exceptions, par- 
ticulars of which we give. 

Charges of Price-Cutting. 

Rice Lewis & Son were charged with 
violating the association agreement, and 
wrote in May, 1892, denying the charge 
and asking that their invoice on which 
wrong prices were alleged to have been 
charged be produced. 

Letters were read referring to the case 
of the HobbsJ Hardware Company, the 
charge against whom was dealt with in 
the minutes. 

The letter to the Massey-Harris Co. 
declining to leave them out of the scope 
of the association was also read. 

In October, 1892, Messrs. McPherson 
& Son applied to be placed on the Mont- 
real list. 

A letter was read written to S. R. 
Foster & Son saying that they were in- 
'ormed that they were selling a line of 
tacks at a price 10 per cent, better than 
the association price. Unless this was 
discontinued, the letter said, it may 
mean that the association will have to 
invade their territory. 

In March 1893, the secretary wrote to 
the Ontario Tack Company saving coop- 
er nails were to be listed' at "best flour 
barrel prices. 

If a member finds that anv particular 
kind of tacks are not on the association 
lists the secretary is to be informed so 
that they may at once be placed on the 
lists. 

(Continued on page 38 ) 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 




BUYING A BUSINESS. 

NK \K1 \ if not quite 50 per cent. 
ol the men who buy the small re- 
tail stoics offered for sale are 
men who have worked at some trade or 
other occupation and who have saved 
enough out of their wages to start them 
in business. 

The kinds of business that are sold to 
inexperienced business men arc mainly 
retail stores, and the amount of capital 
invested by each man runs from $200 or 
for the small store to $3,000 or 
54,000 for the larger establishments, but 
(1,(100 l- an average for investments of 
this class of buyers. 

For $600 can be obtained sometimes a 
well stocked store in a good location, 
and the man who has this amount of 
money will not lack for a variety in the 



t lien- is keener competition. In the new 

location he has the chance to get new 
trade — trade that he obtains through the 
merits of his goods and the treatment 
that he gives to his customers, and this 
is the best custom obtainable. 

In buying a store lie should first of all 
look to the location.- A stock that is 
old and unattractive can be renewed and 
renovated, but poor location can only be 
remedied by moving, and this entails ad- 
ditional expense and loss of time in get- 
ting started, and to the man who is go- 
ing to begin to do business on limited 
capital and experience it is extremely 
(essential that he begin to get trade as 
soon . as possible. 

In determining the choice of a location 
he should thoroughly iasped the neigh- 
borhood and ascertain as far as possible 
the kind of people that reside in it, for 




Hardware Department of the Regina Trading Cos Store. Regina. 



opportunities offered to him for invest- 
ment. In fact, the choice is so great 
that if he has not already decided upon 
the particular line he wishes to enter he 
will probably be puzzled to make a se- 
lection. Even if he has fixed upon one 
kind of business that lie wishes to buy, 
he will find the variety of locations, 
stocks and clientele open for his selec- 
tion is of so many kinds that it will 
take him some time to make his deci- 
sion. 

If he is going to buy a store of any 
kind, it is the consensus of opinion 
among the business brokers that the best 
place for him is not, as might be sup- 
posed, in an old-established place, but 
in a new neighborhood. 

For the man who first enters a new 
locality and sets up a store with a 
clean, bright stock of goods, there is a 
hetter chance for success than for him 
who g'.es into an old location where 



the retail store, outside of the down- 
town district, is almost entirely de- 
pendent upon the trade of the neighbor- 
hood. 



BRANCHING OUT. 

T is notorious that departmental 
stores make more profit in propor- 
tion to investment than one-line 
merchants. 

The reason is simple, in spite of the 
fact that many very good merchants fail 
to see it, or at least to make applica- 
tion to their own business. 

The department store has many lines 
under one roof, which multiply sales 
faster than expense. 

And some one or more of its lines are 
always in season, hence it has no dull 
seasons. 

These two facts explain all there is of 
"mystery" about the profits shown by 
retail department stoics. 

24 



You have a certain fixed ex i which 
cannot be cut, under a certain minimum, 
no matter how low sales sink. This in- 
cludes relit, heat, light, advertising, a 
certain number of salaries, etc. 

In your store, could you not, for ex- 
ample, do a little more business with no 
increase in expense, or a third more 
with only a moderate increase '.' If so, 
nearly all the gross profit on that ex- 
cess business would be net profit. 

In your store, again, does not much 
of the profit of busy December trickle 
away in the expense of dull January 
and February ? And do you not spend 
in July and August much of the profit 
of the busy Spring ? 

Imagine how your profits would jump 
if every week and day in the year you 
had some line in which the people were 
interested, whose sales would make 
good the temporary shortcomings of 
other lines. 

Not every store can be a department 
store, but the retailer who does not 
"branch out" to the limit of his ability 
is missinsr his best chance for profit. 

Ask fifty one-line merchants why they 
do not branch out, and forty-odd of 
them will probably tell you they have 
no capital and no room. Yet most of 
those forty-edd could find both capital 
and the room, simply by turning a por- 
tion of their over-stocks into cash, and 
then ordering a thirty days' supply of 
an article instead of a three months' 
supply. 

Incidentally, this weedi"" • ut of the 
over-stocks would infuse health into 
every part of the business. 

GOOD INTERIOR DISPLAY. 

One of the nicest store interiors we 
have seen for some time is that of the 
hardware department of the Ilegina 
Trading Company's store shown in the 
accompanying illustration. It will be 
seen that the department is about 20 
by 75 in size, one side being used for a 
display of stoves, ranges, lanterns, tin- 
ware, etc., and the other for counters 
and shelf goods. At the back is a neat- 
ly arranged display of heaters, tools, 
whips, etc. The silver and cutlery 
showcases, Bennett boxes and pyramid 
of paint tins gives the department a 
very cleanly and business-like appear- 
ance. 

The company moved into their new 
building about three years ago and have 
a large warehouse in the rear. Mr. J. 
F. Bole, recently elected to the Sas- 
katchewan Legislature, is manager of 
the company, and Mr. Dickie, formerly 
of Morton & Ewan, Campbellford, Ont., 
is in charge of the hardware depart- 
ment. The hardware department shown 
is a part of the large store on Main 
street, their whole stock being excep- 
tionally neat and well kept. 

Down in Texas a prominent merchant 
has just completed what he calls his 
grand key and tag sale. Every pur- 
chaser who buys goods to the amount 
of $1 or more is given a key with a tag 
attached. One of these keys will unlock 
a box containing $25 in cash. On a cer- 
tain date all of the keys that have been 
distributed to customers are sent back 
and the holder of the key that will un- 
lock the box is given the contents. 
These keys cost the merchant a little 
over $1 a hundred. The scheme is said 
to have been a great success and the 
merchant says he will repeat the ven- 
ture. 



January 13, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 




A FAULTY CIRCULAR. 

From McGregor & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, Caledonia, Ont., there conies for 
review a large 12xl£ circular, but I am 
afraid that circulars of this size really 
cease to be circulars. They are more 
suited for street display than for send- 
ing to the homes of the people or for 
having on the counter. 



The larger the circular the greater its 
liability to be torn, the poorer its 
chances to make a lasting impression. 
Someone has said that weight is not 
.strength. Neither is size the be-all and 
end-all of advertising. 

* * * 

Judging from the introductory sen- 
Leuces, McGregor & Co. evidently in- 
tended this circular to be the messenger 
bearing greetings and a "little talk" on 
business. How much better the result 
if the circular had been in keeping with 
the mission ! One naturally looks for 
something dainty in the Yuletide season. 
If ever a merchant should spread him- 
self it is then. If ever he should forsake 
the conventionalities of retail publicity 
it is at Christmas time. 



The circular is the most common form 
of publicity to be found amongst retail- 
ers. It does good work. But when one 
has more to say than can be said on 
the circular proper, the booklet or fold- 
er should be chosen. This applies to any 
season of the year. 



is not told. The "Columbia Stock Pre- 
parations" is the best item on the cir- 
cular. "Step-ladders" is fair. 



The closing sentences of the circular 
are snappy and forceful, though there 
are one or two ellipses. "If we please 
you," etc., is a time-worn phrase that 
has lost every vestige of originality, 
yet it is surprising what a large num- 
ber of retailers continue to call it into 

service. 

• * 

Viewed from a typographical stand- 
point, there is very little to be said in 
laudation of McGregor's circular. Some 
of the fonts seem to have been selected 



OvfMUL an© WDOTOB 




We take this opportunity of thanking- our 

many Customers for their patronage and solicit their continuance ; 

and to those who are not already customers, we would be glad 

to have them, give us a trial. We are sure we 

can please yon. 




Food Choppers in 3 Sizes 



A Guaranteed Axe $100 



Wire Fencing 




Leather Mitts and Gloves for Service, Comfort and Appearance, either 



As regards the make-up of the Mc- 
Gregor circular, there is less to be said 
pro than con. It is an unpropitious be- 
ginning, in any form of advertising 
printing, to commence with a cheap 
stock cut that illustrates nothing rele- 
vant. It only serves to disfigure the 
whole. The circular, unfortunately, was 
designed without an eye to balance. All 
the large cuts are on one side, also the 
solid matter. The opening sentences are 
poorly worded and there is a confusion 
of persons— a grammatical error common 
enough in advertising matter. 



The item on cooking and heating 
stoves is to the point and apparently 
covers the ground. The word "Imper- 
ial" below the illustration was, I am 
informed, incorrectly placed there. Mc- 
Gregor & Co. noticed the mistake after 
i! was printed, so the word was marked 
out in each case. 

* * • 

The item with the axe-head is, of 
course, a medley — just so strong, just so 
weak. The one on leather mitts, etc., 
is a little better. "Sursingles" is usual- 
ly spelled "surcingles." The skates item 
is good as far as it goes. The cutlery 
illustration is too large. The saw in 
the item beginning "Stove boards" 
should have been up with the axe-head. 
The elephant is a trade-mark, but whose 



Horse Blankets 

Sursingles Rope Ties 

Halters Sleigh Bells 



_JL .jsl.vJ*£~ aft 




A Good Supply of 

UIUB hX. PLATE 



ting. This would account for much of 
the "spreading" and "drawing in." But 
the compositor should have preserved 
more uniformity of display fonts and 
distinguished between main headings and 
subsidiary headings. The compositor, 
too, should have suggested a re-arrange- 
ment of the items to overcome the one- 
sided effect 1 spoke of above. lie should 
have called for more wording on items 
like "Horse blankets" and set .the rest 
of the small items after the style of 
"Stove boards." 



Summing up McGregor & Co.'s work 
I would say that their chief error was 
in choosing the wrong model. In a 
booklet there would have been more in- 
dividualitv to their advertising because 
the matter being grouped off into pages 
would ostensibly have more order to it. 
1 [owever, an improvement could be made 
on the present circular. Folded twice, 
the same amount of paper would give 
approximately eight octavo pages, or in 
other words, double the amount of mat- 
ter. True, there would be more setting 
and presswork, but I think the improve 
ment would be worth the expense. 



With the present arrangement the back 
of- the circular or sheet is entirely wast- 
ed. The idea of folding the sheet twice 
and setting the details page by page, 
would be to utilize this space and at 
the same time facilitate handling. If 
McGregor & Co. had insufficient data to 
make eight pages, the first page could be 
given over to the word "Greetings," 
the second page be a blank, and the third 
page have the greetings proper. On the 
fourth or fifth pages the details could 
commence. This arrangement would be 
in keeping with good standards. 



OHttc Ift.len 



•;,S"".^«"-r,i^*iJS Builders Supplies- ' •" >^ "g^ c '~ 

r.n r.f., Waifcw .^. f — ^fjl^r-^j''^ Boltl Hingn ivaSaa Hufm V,. n „ho ^P^H V!?£ 




S3 00 a Pail 







IMZc&ZEtiB&OIR. <Sc CO., 



Of course it is understood that such an 
arrangement! as the above would not be 
a booklet in the proper sense of the 
Isddders wor d- It would simply be a matter of 
modelling the present sheet after the 
booklet style to give more strength, ap- 
pealing force and symmetry to the de- 
tails. The make-up would not be cut, 
consequently not stitched, and there 
would be no cover. 



as much to fill out a line as to measure 
up to a standard of suitability. Why is 
"Food choppers in 3 sizes," apart from 
the inconsistency of figure in one case 
and word in the other, larger than 
"Cow chains in five sizes" ? Why is 
"Our cooking" larger than "Heating 
stoves" ? Is "Nickel plate" not entitled 
to more display than "a good supply 
of" ? These are but a few of many in- 
stances where "there ceases to be art." 



True, some concession must be made 
to the compositor. The matter in the 
circular was evidently not sized up by 
the advertiser preparatory to the set- 

25 



Advertisers sending booklets or adver- 
tising matter for criticism should send 
in duplicate. 

A. A. B. 



STOVE ADVERTISING. 

It is none too early to be fig-uring- on 
the Spring stove business. It will come 
soon. 



Plan your advertising for 1906 now. 
Determine how much you can spend on 
stove advertising- and arrange a cam- 
paign for its expenditure. You must 
have some sort of a plan before you can 
do successful advertising. 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



January 13, 1906 



Hardware-Metal 



President : 
JOHS BAYSE MACLEAN 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of 1 r.tde Newspapers which circulate m 

ihe Provinces of British Columbia. .North-West Ter- 
ritories. Manitoba, Ontario. Quebec, Nova Scotia, 
New Brunswick, IMC. Island and Newfoundland. 



Mi'msui, XB) McOill Street 

Telephone Main 1255 

Tokon ro. 10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 
Winnipeg. - - - ill Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3726 
LOKDON, t.su .... 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKin. 
. Telephone. Central 12960 

BRANCHES : 

Si. John. N.B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf 

VANCOUVER, B.C. - - - Geo. S. B. Perry 

Paris, France - Agence Havas, 8 Plac* dela Bourse 
Manchester. Eng. 92 Market Street 

ZiRicH, Switzerland - - - Louis Wolt 

Orell Fussli & Co. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

r i_i ijj I Adscript, London 

Cable Address ( Adscri £ t Canada 



DIFFICULTIES IN BUYING. 

A hardwareman has to deal in a num- 
ber of articles, the quality of which is 
very difficult to yausre correctly. It is 
in buying, even more than in selling, 
that his shrewdness and good judgment 
can be shown, and upon the interpreta- 
tion which a man puts upon the word 
"shrewdness" depends to a large ex- 
tent the reputation which his business 
will acquire. It may mean the business 
ngTrt which will enable him to give 
bis customers the greatest possible 
value for their money, while still con- 
sulting his own profits. Or, on the 
other hand, it may mean (as it too of- 
ten does) the ability to "beat down" a 
salesman, buy at the lowest possible 
figures and sell at the very highest mar- 
ket prices. To a man of this latter 
calibre the question of quality will very 
soon become subordinate to that of 
price, with disastrous results to his 
business. 

But no matter to which of these 
classes the merchant may belong, he 
will surely be interested in the problem 
of scientific buying, and it is well for 
everyone to understand very clearly 
that buying is scientific. To an ordin- 
ary individual an article of distinctly 
inferior quality may show up equally 
well with one of known value, in which 
case a mistaken idea of shrewdness may 
induce him to purchase the inferior 
grade because it is cheaper. A buyer, 
however, with a technical knowledge of 
the article he is buying, and a desire to 
build a reputation for quality, would 
not fail to see the advantage of putting 



a somewhat larger sum into decidedly 
superior cods. 

IVu things in the hardware list are 
so difficult to lni\ intelligently as cord- 
ago, which we maj use to illustrate oui 
int. The market is admittedly 
flooded with good, bad, ami indifferent 
rope at all kinds of prices. A cheap 
sisal may actually look as strong to 
>>nc who is not, skilled in its manufac- 
ture as the purest manila, and there 
arc iikiih grades between these. More- 
over, it may stand as good a test. For 
all modern mills submit their product 
to a breaking test before putting it on 
the market. 

But the only real test of quality is 
the actual wear and tear of everyday 
use. An inferior rope, one made of 
short threads, or a poor quality of 
fibre, may withstand a breaking test in 
the mill, but when subjected to the 
hard usage required by contracting 
firms (who are, after all, the largest 
consumers) its threads begin to un- 
ravel and its capacity is soon lost. 
. Another important circumstance to be 
considered is the conditions under which 
the rope is worked, and this is especi- 
ally true of transmission rope. A great 
deal depends upon whether the pulleys 
are true, or their flanges smooth. A 
case in point is a piece of transmission 
rope which has been used for years by a 
large mill not far from Montreal, with 
scarcely any noticeable effect upon its 
strength, while other ropes of the same 
kind, supplied by the same manufac- 
turers, have succumbed to the strain in 
far less time, because they were work- 
ing under imperfect conditions. 

It is in the hope that merchants will 
pay greater attention to their buying 
that these words are written. If we 
have been able to show that buying is 
a difficult matter — that it is in fact a 
science — our purpose has been accom- 
plished. 



COMMERCIAL TRAVELERS' TAX. 

A strong and commendable stand is 
taken by the Toronto Globe- when it 
says : "There will be general satisfac- 
tion over the announcement from Que- 
bec that the tax on commercial travel- 
ers will be reduced from $300 to $100. 
But outside of the political circle who 
are anxious for a means of taxation 
that will cause little dissatisfaction, the 
general feeling will be quite as strong 
as before in favor of abolition. Indus- 
trial Canada declares that abolition, not 
modification, is what the business men 
of this country desire, and that 'even 
were the amount reduced from $300 to 
$3 it would still meet with the same 
persistent opposition.' Similar methods 

26 



of taxation have been adopted in British 
Columbia and Prince Edward Island, 
and while the revenue secured has been 
small, the disorganization of business 
and the ultimate burden on the public, 
yvho must in the last analysis contri- 
bute, has been heavy, though partly con- 
cealed. The measurers a continuation of 
the protection policy, and raises the un- 
solved problem of the protection unit. 
II the people of a nation can make them- 
selves prosperous by making it difficult 
for themselves to purchase things from 
abroad, it follows naturally that the 
people of a province or even of a munici- 
pality can do the same. In fact the 
municipalities of Brandon and Rossland 
are trying the experiment of a tax on 
commercial travelers. Similar efforts 
have been made by many municipalities 
under the guise of market regulations, 
inspections, and local taxation. By 
every obstruction, no matter how ab- 
surd, some few are certain to benefit, 
and these become a concentrated interest 
organized against reform, while the gen- 
eral public interest has no organiza- 
tion." 



CHANGE IN BONDING SYSTEM. 

New regulations of the Customs De- 
partment are making quite a change in 
the working system of bonded ware- 
houses. Heretofore there were in the 
city of Montreal about ninety such 
warehouses, each paying a tax of $40 
per year. But, as some of them requir- 
ed the services of an officer during the 
whole day, while others needed one for 
only an hour or two, this arrangement 
was considered unfair, and a new sys- 
tem introduced. 

These latest regulations, which went 
into force last week, provide that ware- 
houses which require the services of an 
officer during the whole of the day shall 
pay $480 per annum. In the smaller 
warehouses taxes are to be levied in 
proportion to the length of time daily 
in which an officer's services are requir- 
ed, based on a charge of $5 per month 
for a warehouse needing the attendance 
of an officer for one hour a day only. 

Merchants in Montreal have been 
quick to see the advantages of this new 
scheme, and arrangements have been 
made by which a group of merchants 
having bonds in a district may have an 
officer to use as they see fit by paying 
the maximum tax. 

Judging from the large number of 
applications for first-class bonds at 
$480 per annum which have already been 
received, it is anticipated that the 
annual revenue from this source will 
amount to nearly fifteen thousand dol- 
lars, as against thirty-five hundred un- 
der the old regulations. 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware and Metal 



THE TACK COMBINE 

Elsewhere in this issue about six 
pages are devoted to a stenographic re- 
port of the investigation being made 
this week in the Toronto Police Court 
into the minutes and letter books of the 
Canada Tack Association. No other 
paper is giving a complete report. Hard- 
ware and Metal, however, as the news- 
paper of the Canadian hardware trade, 
gives the fullest possible report so that 
its readers can judge tor themselves as 
to the legality of the trade association 
under investigation, it being conducted 
upon similar lines to dozens of others 
doing business in Canada and other 
countries. 

As will be seen by the snatches of 
conversation occurring during the trial, 
the magistrate and prosecuting attorney 
view matters from an entirely different 
standpoint than business men who re- 
cognize the necessity of maintaining 
prices on a profit-making basis. The sys- 
tem of discounts also seems to confuse 
the court officials, although its utility 
has long ago been proven to the business 
world. 

The reading of the evidence is rather 
wearisome and the only matter we de- 
sire to draw attention to is the incident 
in which the tack manufacturers endeav- 
ored to secure the trade of the Massey- 
Harris Company, who were unwilling to 
divide their business among a number of 
manufacturers. The association officers 
in trying to get the order proposed that 
one manufacturer secure the contract at 
a certain figure and then divide his pro- 
fits with the unsuccessful tenderers. The 
deal did not go through as the Massey- 
Harris Company received a closer quo- 
tation from the United States, but the 
court considers the intent as unlawful as 
if the act had been committed and the 
incident is remarkably similar to the 
bonus system used by the Toronto 
plumbers who have already been convict- 
ed or committed for trial. It is appar- 
ent, therefore, that the Police Court in- 
vestigation will result in the accused 
tack men being committed for trial along 
with the plumbers and plumbing supply 
men. 

A feature of the investigation is the 
evident desire an the part of the prose- 
cutors to show that the different manu- 
facturers have not been trying to get 
business and there has been no competi- 
tion. The fact is, however, that travel- 
ers for jobbing houses meet tack sales- 
men everywhere throughout the country 
and the representatives of the manufac- 
turers are very keen after business. 
When accused of soliciting business from 
the retail trade the tack men say they 
are only selling in certain quantities, 
but there is no doubt that jobbers resent 
the invasion of their branch of the trade 
by the manufacturers. 



Our report covers the doings in the 
Police Court up to Thursday noun. On 
Thursday afternoon the investigation 

proceeded but there was little of ini- 
portance touched upon before the court 
adjourned until Monday, when the fcriaj 
will be again proceeded with. 



CO-OPERATION INADEQUATE. 

Co-operation is at various times sug- 
gested by some as a remedy for farm- 
ers and working- men to use against 
merchants and manufacturers, but in 
America the producing sections of me 
eornmunitj have aever shown that thej 
are able to hold together long enough to 
build up a:i enterprise sufficiently large 
to make its success certain, in Great 
Britain the co-operative movement is a 
powerful factor in the commercial world, 
but it gained its strength before the era 
of trusts and combines had been usher- 
ed in throughout the world. 

But has the co-operative movement 
been of much value to the working class 
of the Mother Country'/ Charles E. 
Russell answers this question in Every- 
body's Magazine for November in his 

first instalment of ."Soldiers of the (' - 

mon Good." He clearly shows that co- 
operation, like trades unionism, is a pure- 
ly selfish movement organized for the 
benefit of those "on the inside." 

That he sees co-operation as prac- 
tical under capitalism is inadequate to 
affect the real cause of poverty is 
shown in the following extract: 

"The slums grow for all of co- 
operation, the slums and Mayfair, 
Whitechapel and Park Lane. The 
enormous estates are no smaller, the 
great fortunes gather their incre- 
ment, surplusage and deficiency. Waste 
and want are exactly as before. Still 
unchecked in any way, greed accumu- 
lates and penury gnaws crusts and re- 
mainder old bones. 

"In London are 129,000 registered 
paupers. What is co-operation to 
them .' There are 1 ,;,lll).l!ll(l persons 
that are practically Starving What 
is co-operation to them? There is a 
vast population that crawls about in 
sub-cellars and filth and misery un- 
utterable. What is co-operation to 
these"? 

"In every English city, one-fifth of 
the inhabitants never know what it is 
to have enough to eat, never sleep in 
a decent bed, never know wealth nor 
decency, nor comfort. What is co- 
operation to them "? Co-operation ! 
They have nothing to buy; they have 
9.7 



nothing to save. While the co-opera- 
tors increase in numbers, steadily in- 
crease also the ranks of the pau- 
pers, the starving, the degenerate, the 

brutish, the prowling, and the Blinking 
creatures of the East End. 

"Are these the poor we are Lo hav ■ 
with us always"/ Not at all, not at 
all. They are the awful menace and 
the awful retribution uf a system oi 
civilization that must have in it some 
thing radically wrong. Wise men in 
England are under no hallucination :| " 
to the meaning of the gaunt, sickly 
forms that herd and doze about the 
greasy arches of Whitechapel. 

"Royal commissions, appalled at 
iIh statistics of the increasing ratios 
of pauperism, insanity and disease, an' 
laboriously trying to find a remedy 
lor a monstrous and sinister evil against 
which co-operation avails nothing. 

"For the truth is that, compared with 
the real disease that drags down Eng- 
land and threatens every other nation, 
co-operation works to save only those 
that are already saved." 



QUIT AT LAST. 

It would appear that the new trading 
stamp law has been eminently satisfac- 
tory, judging from the latest circular 
issued by the Trading Advertising Com- 
pany, of Montreal, which reads as fol- 
lows : 

"Dear Sir : — In regard to the saving 
coupon, we find it is going to be im- 
possible to continue business profitably 
on the present plan, and we have there- 
fore decided to discontinue the same. We 
would advise you not to give saving cou- 
pons to your customers unless it is un- 
derstood that you are to redeem them. 
We are sorry that matters have turned 
out this way, but the stand that the 
Retail Merchants Association has taken 
against us makes it impossible for us to 
'continue. Thanking you for being will- 
ing to assist us as you have done." 

When the Trading Stamp Act was 
passed by the Dominion House last ses- 
sion the Trading Advertising Company 
announced that they would be able to 
continue in business under another plan 
known as saving coupons. 

The Trading Stamp Act was passed 
so that when retail merchants give their 
customers tickets, coupons, or cash reg- 
ister receipts they must have the mer- 
chant's name, address and the mercan- 
tile value of each ticket or coupon, and 
they must be redeemed at any time by 
any person at the store where they were 
given out. This gives the customer a 
chance to get full value for discount 
which the tickets are supposed to repre- 
sent, and it prevents the merchant from 
redeeming them with cheap articles of 
furniture or other things of very little 
value. 



hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



January 13, 1906 



BIG MERGER OF SAW INTERESTS. 

A year ago the saw factories of the 
James Robertson Company at Toronto, 
Mont leal ami St. John were taken over 
by the Canada Saw Company, which al- 
ecured control of other concerns at 
Ottawa and Montreal. The Ottawa 
plant is being removed to Montreal and 
the factory m the latter city consider- 
ably enlarged. It is announced that the 
Simonds Manufacturing Company, saw 
and knife makers, with factories at 
Kitchburg, Mass., and Chicago, 111., and 
steel plants at Chicago, New York, San 
Francisco and New Orleans, has taken 
over the business of the Canada Saw 
Company, and the new company will be 
known as the Simonds-Canada Saw 
Company, and operated under the Can- 
ada Saw Company's charter in Canada. 
More than $250,000 is involved in the 
merger. 

The new company will continue to 
operate the plants now in operation, but 
there will undoubtedly be some enlarge- 
ments shortly as the Simonds people 
will spend considerable money to in- 
crease their Canadian trade. In the 
past they have left" this field to the 
Disston and Atkins interests in competi- 
tion with Canadian manufacturers. Saw 
mill men are conservative buyers so that 
the move of the Simonds people in tak- 
ing oyer an established business rather 
than '.'butting in" on a field well cover- 
ed already, is a shrewd one. 

The leading Canadian producers out- 
side the new merger are Messrs. Shurly 
<V Dietrich, Gait, and the E. C. Smith 
Company, St. Catharines, although 
there are several smaller manufacturers. 
The Disston Company will have their 
Toronto factory built this Spring and 
will not have to import after this year. 
With the Simonds and Disston compan- 
ies on the ground and the Atkins Com- 
pany doing a large importing trade 
Canadian manufacturers will meet with 
keen competition and will have to adopt 
enterprising methods in order to hold 
their own in future. 



SEASONABLE SUGGESTIONS. 

Start to work while the year is young. 
It's the way to make your business year 
eclipse any of the past. Now's the time 
to plan for the trade of the prospective 
buyer. 

Cutting prices leads to bitterness and 
animosities between competitors, it is a 
very dangerous plan and generally re- 
sults in demoralizing local business as 
competition retaliates. If you decide to 
lower prices to meet catalogue house 
competition, talk it over with others in 
your town who handle the same goods, 
explain your position and what you are 
going to do. Work together. If a spirit 
of protection against foreign houses is 
maintained, all can surely work in har- 
mony and all will be benefitted. 



SUCCESSFUL JOBBERS 
AND SALESMEN. 



No. 1-f. 



A familiar figure among building cir- 
cles is Mr. Cieo. W. Daines, who repre- 
sents the Metal Shingle & Siding Co., 
of Preston, Out. Mr. Daines got his 
early business experience with the gro- 
cer) linn of Scroggie Dros., Guelph, 
where he was employed for many years. 
(nining to Toronto about ten years ago, 
lie secured a position as traveler with 
the Eby, Blain Co., Limited, wholesale 
grocers, whom he successfully represent- 
ed on the Wellington, Grey and Druce 
division of the Grand Trunk Railway. 
On leaving the Eby, Dlain Co., Limited, 




Geo. W. Baines 
Representing Metal Shingle and Siding- Company, 
Preston, Ont. 

Mr. Raines became special representative 
of the Metal Shingle 6i Siding Co., his 
present firm. He has covered almost the 
whole of Canada for this company, and 
he has been very successful in getting 
business. 

Mr. Baines' heart is in his business, 
and his penchant for figuring on big con- 
tracts is phenomenal. Among the jobs 
recently secured by him may be mention- 
ed goods for the Canada Car Company, 
Montreal, T. Eaton Co., Winnipeg, and 
the Lindsay Co., Ottawa. 

Mr. Daines visits Montreal frequently 
to assist the local representative of his 
firm, Mr. J. D. Dagenais. 



PUSHING TRADS IN JANUARY. 

To keep up interest after the holiday 
rush merchants have to offer better bar- 
gains and advertise much harder. Why 
not go through the stock and dig. out 

28 



some slow selling lines for a clean-up 
sale i That's the way your friend the 
drvgoodsman does. Why shouldn't you* 
You may have a dozen mouse traps that 
people do not seem to want, and a size 
of dripping pan that is useless — or 
seems so, and some enameled ware that 
has chipped somewhat. Bunch all the 
stuff together and advertise a "Clean- 
up Sale." Go after it as if you meant 
business and throw in 'whatever holiday 
goods that you have left over. You may 
surprise your cash register during Janu- 
ary this way. 



OUR LETTER BOX 

Correspondence on matters of interest to the hard- 
ware trade is solicited. Manufacturers, jobbers, 
retailers and clerks are urged to express their opin- 
ions on matters under discussion. 



OVERTIME AND VACATIONS. 

Editor of Hardware and Metal :— The 
discussion started by Mr. Wiggs is a 
very interesting one and I believe it a 
good thing to have an interchange of 
opinions on such matters in order to 
secure as great a uniformity as possible 
in practice. 

We do not record our clerks' time, 
consequently no fines are imposed or re- 
wards given ; nor do we pay our clerks 
for overtime, as it is understood when 
they engage that any overtime necessary 
in their department is part of the ar- 
rangement. 

We make no deduction for time lost 
through sickness, attendance at funerals, 
or such matters, excepting where the 
period might be a very long one ; but 
for ordinary cases no deductions are 
made. 

We give all our clerks a vacation of 
ten working days with wages paid. 

The above of course applies only to 
our clerical staff. In the manufacturing 
department we pay only for the time 
actually worked, no allowance for holi- 
days or sickness ; but overtime is paid 
for at the rate of time and a half from 
five to nine p.m., and after that we pay 
double time. 

Regarding time clock, I believe this to 
be a necessity in connection with a 
manufacturing concern or department 
where men are paid exactly in accord- 
ance with the time worked. In connec- 
tion with a mercantile establishment it 
might not be so necessary, but would 
prove a very wholesome check upon erh- 
ployes who are not punctual and who 
for that reason set a bad example to 
others. When an employe persists in 
keeping bad time and cannot be cured, 
it seems to me there is only one thing 
to do and that is to let him seek env 
ployment elsewhere. 

EMERSON & FISHER. LIMITED. 
W. S. FISHER. . . 

St. John, N.D., Jan. 5, 1906. 



January 13, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 



Hardware Trade Gossip 



Quebec. 

Louis Gauthier, dealer in tinware, St. 
Tie, visited Montreal a few days ago. 

T. TT. Newman, of Cavcrhill, Lear- 
mont & Co., spent part of this week in 
Toronto. 

Ulric ITervieux, tinsmith, of St. 
Outhbert, called on Montreal supply 
houses recently. 

Liniere Gregoire, plumber, of St. 
Javite, paid a short visit to Montreal 
during: the week. 

The Colonial Cordage Co., of Toronto, 
have appointed as their Montreal agents 
the Commercial Twine Co. 

Chas. Dietrich, representing: Shurly 
& Dietrich, Gait, Ont., called on the 
Montreal wholesale trade this week. 

W. F. Whellams, of F. J. C. Cox & 
Co . Winnipeg:, is spending; the week in 
Montreal, his trip being - chiefly of a 
business nature. 

Walter Grose, Montreal, has left for 
New York and various other United 
States points, where he will spent a 
couple of weeks. 

Joseph Huette. hardware merchant, 
tinsmith and roofer, of St. Hyacinthe, 
was in Montreal this week on a general 
buving- expedition. 

George H. Du^snn, who has been 
third vice-president of the Dominion 
Coal Co., has been promoted to be sec- 
ond vice-president. 

Mr. Chanlin. of the Welland Vale 
Mfg\ Co., St. Catharines. Ont., was in 
Montreal during' the week, in the in- 
terests of his business. 

Tn ' an interesting game of hockev, 
nlaved Thursdav hierht of last week, the 
Starke # Hardware Comnanv defeated the 
Thistles bv a score of 3 to 1. 

C. P. Tucker, of Alex. McArthur & 
Co., uaper manufacturers, Montreal, is 
enjoying- a trip to England. He will 
be absent for about a month. 

Arthur Mae-nan. who for several years 
has been assistant hardware appraiser 
at the Montreal custom house, has been 
anpointed appraiser, to succeed the late 
James H. Douglas. 

Geore-e Ramsden, of Caverhill, Lear- 
mont & Co.'s traveling: staff, spent a 
few days this week at the firm's Mont- 
real warerooms. fixing- up his samples 
For the Spring- trade. 

John R. Baxter, until recently with 
Robt. Gardner & Son, Montreal, has 
accepted a position as traveling- repre- 
sentative with L. N. Beard, St. James 
street, of the same citv. 

New building-s erected in Montreal 
during- the year 1905 numbered almost 
two thousand, at a total cost of $4,- 
770,380.. Dwelling- houses formed the 
largest feature of these building- opera- 
tions. 

C. M. Strange, salesmanag-er and di- 
rector of Lewis Bros.. Limited, Mont- 
real, returned Wednesday from King- 
ston, where he was called to attend the 
funeral of his father, the late Dr. Or- 
lando Strange. 



In the first match of the Manufactur- 
ers' Hockey League, Montreal, the Can- 
adian Rubber Co.'s team beat the sep- 
tette representing Allis-Chalmers-Bul- 
loik by a score of 2 to 1, in a keenly 
contested game. 

J. Ernest Miller, of John Miller & 
Sons, Montreal, is this week taking a 
trip to Toronto, Buffalo, and Pitts- 
burg. While in the latter city he at- 
tended the annual meeting of the Shelby 
Steel Tube Co.'s distributors. Chas. 
Bradfield, manager of the firm's To- 
ronto branch, accompanied Mr. Miller. 

J. H. Roper has been appointed Can- 
adian representative of John Shaw & 
Sons, Wolverhampton, Eng-land. Mr. 
Roper is widelv known to the trade, 
having been a successful traveler for 
years. As a worker he has few equals, 
and his enterprise and energv won laur- 
els for other firms, and they should not 
have lost their force when they become 
active for the sterling house which he 
now controls. 

Ernest Archambault, hardware mer- 
chant, 661 Notre Dame street, Mont- 
real, has purchased a bankrupt stock, 
and will open a branch hardware store 
at the corner of Fullum and St. Cath- 
erine streets, where he will keep a large 
stock of builders' hardware, stoves, etc. 
His Notre Dame street store will be 
enlarged and renovated to accommo- 
date his rapidly increasing business, 
which is principally with the farmers. 

T. J. Best has tendered his resigna- 
tion as director and superintendent of 
Warden King & Son, Montreal, with the 
re'quest that it be allowed to take effect 
at once. Mr. Best has been with this 
firm for nearly twenty years, having en- 
tered their employ as foreman in June, 
1886. For the past ten or twelve years 
he has been director and superintendent. 
In a few weeks Mr. Best purposes going 
to Winnipeg to look into some iron busi- 
ness propositions that have come to his 
notice. It is quite likely Mr. Best will 
settle in the west. 

Ontario. 

R. J. Cluff, Toronto, spent a few days 
in Montreal during the past week. 

The hardware store of Krauter & 
Ritchie, Ethel, was burned to the ground 
last week. 

R. Kerr, of the Kerr Engine Company, 
Walkerville, was a visitor in Toronto 
this week. 

G.eorge Millward, Port Hope, was a 
visitor in Toronto buying goods from 
plumbing supply men this week. 

B. J. Morris, secretary of the Central 
Supply Association, Toronto, has re- 
turned from a trip to New York. 

James Molds, of the Star Plumbing & 
Heating Company, Winnipeg, has been a 
visitor in Toronto on a buying trip. 

J. C. Park, plumber and steamfitter, 
London, was a caller at the Toronto of- 
fice of Hardware and Metal this week. 

The Toronto office of the Canada Paint 
Company is being thoroughly renovated 
and given a good dose of Elephant brand 
mixed paints. 

29 



Beit Ormiston has returned to his 
duties at the Ontario Lead & Wire Com- 
pany, Toronto, after a holiday trip to 
Providence, R.I. 

• John Fisher, of .John Fisher & Son 
Dundas, formerly manager [pi Rice 
Lewis & Son, Toronto, was a visitor in 
Toronto' this week. 

F. L. Hutchins, of the firm of Hutch- 
ins Bros., manufacturers' agents, Van- 
couver, B.C., has been in Toronto and 
Hamilton on a business trip. 

S. E. Waffle, Smith's Falls, represent- 
ing Alex. McArthur & Co., Montreal, 
was a caller at the Toronto office of 
Hardware and Metal a few days ago. 

H. F. Falkiner, George street, Toron- 
to, wholesale harness supplies and pol 
ishes, is now in his new premises ad 
joining No. 60, which with the latter 
gives him double floor space. 

The Kennedy Hardware Company arc 
considering the question of moving into 
larger premises. They report a very 
satisfactory year's business in 1905 and 
their expanding business makes a move 
necessary at an early date. 

The agents of the Frost Wire Fence 
Company, Limited, gathered in Hamil- 
ton this week for their annual conven- 
tion. About 150 agents were on hand. 
There was a banquet at the Hotel Roy- 
al. The convention -wound up Thursday 
by a trip to Niagara Falls. 

The Canada Brass Rolling Mills, Lim- 
ited, and Robert E. Menzie are defend- 
ants in a suit for the return of $5,000 
which F. S. Wooster alleges was obtain- 
ed from him for stock in the company 
by alleged "fraudulent representations" 
on the part of Robert Menzie. 

The Shovel & Tool Company, Peter- 
boro, has decided to increase its capital 
stock from $50,000 to $100,000, and to 
authorize the issue of an additional 
$25,000 of stock at present. The reason 
is that the stock of manufactured goods 
and raw material is a very large item, 
and it requires a considerable amount to 
carry the business between seasons. 

H. C. Hamilton, of Sault Ste. Marie, 
who was in the city this week, stated 
that it was the intention of the Sbo 
Company to pay off the loan of $2,0(i0.- 
000, which has been guaranteed by the 
Ontario Government, as soon as it falls 
due. He added that the town had got 
back most of its former prosperity. The 
monthly pay roll of the company runs 
up to about $140,000 or $150,000. 



FOUNDRY OFFICES MOVED. 

O. Vickery, Toronto manager of the 
Guelph Foundry Company, returned 
from a trip to Boston and the Maritime 
Provinces a few days ago, visiting Am- 
herst, N.S., on the trip, he being the 
western representative of the Amherst 
Foundry Company. This company is 
now manufacturing a full line of enam- 
eled ware and two new furnaces have 
recently been installed for this work. 

Mr. Vickery reports that during t he- 
past few months he has disposed of over 
six carloads of Amherst enamel ware 
from his Toronto office. At the first of 
the year the office and warerooms were 
removed from 176 to 178 Victoria 
street, the new quarters being in the 
Massey Hall building. Here a large 
stock of Perfect Idea ranges, Kelly fur- 
naces, etc., is carried in stock in addi- 
tion to samples of euamelware. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 




(For detailed prices see Current Market Quotations, pave 74.) 



THE WEEK'S MARKETS IN BRIEF. 

MONTREAL. 
Building Paper New lists have been issued. 
White Lead and Red Lead have advanced. 
Old Materials Slight advances have been de- 
dared in Sonne lines. 
Ingot Zinc is now 7'ji-. to 714c. 
Antimony is quoted ',o. higher. 

TORONTO. 

Brass Coods Compression and Fuller work 
and Valves have been moved up. 

Enamalware Closet combinations and Ameri- 
can goods are higher. 

Linseed Oil — Another Ic. advance has been 
made. 

White LeadJ— Quotations are now at $<;.05 for 
pure white. 

Red Lead - Prices have advanced in small 
quantities. 

Putty - Quotations on barrel orders are higher. 

Building: Paper Advances in some lines are 
proposed . 

Brass has been advanced from 111 to net list. 

Old Metals -Brass and copper are being quoted 
higher. 



Quebec Hardware Markets 

orb.-.- of Hardware a\h Hetax, 

232 Met Jill Street. 

Montreal, Jan 12, 1906 

Although somewhat better than last 
week, trade is still very quiet. Hani 
ware merchants in many parts of tin- 
province arc still busy at the task of 
stock-taking, ami they are unwilling- to 
make any large purchases just now. 

.V few travelers arc still at the ware- 
houses, fixing up their samples, but the 
majority of them arc. by this time, hack 
on the road, and arc sending in fair 
orders for the time of year. 

Changes in price arc not numerous, 
this week, as many of the linns who have 
withdrawn emulations have m>t yel 
completed their new lists. These are to 
be expected shortly. A rather import 
ant amendment in the price list of dif- 
ferent building papers has been announc- 
ed during the week, all the changes mak- 
ing for higher figures than those current 
last year. 

Axes— A fairly brisk trade is report- 
ed. Our prices are unchanged; as fol- 
lows: Chopping axes. inihandleil 
to $9.50 per dozen : double bitt 
axes. $9.50 to $12 a dozen; handled 
axes. $7.50 to $9.50; Canadian pattern 
axes, $7.50 a dozen. 

Handles— "We quote: No. 3, $1.25; 
Nd. 2, $1.50; No. 1, $1.90 a dozen; adze 
handler 34 inch, $2.20 a dozen; pick- 
handle^. No. 2. $1.70; No. 3. $1.50 a 
dozen. 

Sewing Machines— Conditions are in 
no reaped different from those of last 
week. We give prices as follows; 
Hand-sewing machines, $11 each, net: 
complete machines, with stand, $18.00 
and up, according to quality. 



Lanterns— Turnover is scarcely as 

lively as had been expected. Our 
prices remain as follows: Cold blast. 
$4.50; No. n Safety, $5.00. 

Rivets and Burrs— A tendency to- 
wards advanced prices is manifest, es- 
pecially in copper goods. We quote: 
I '.e>i iron rivets, section, carriage and 
wagon box, black rivets, tinned do.. 
copper rivets and tin swede rivets, 60, 
11) and 10 per cent.; swede iron buns 
are quoted at 00 and 10 ami 10 per cent. 
off new lists; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 40 per cent. 
off; and coppered iron rivets and burrs 
in 5-lb. carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 
10 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 30 per 
cent., subject to usual charge for 
half-pound boxes. 

Hay Wire- Our prices remain: No. 13, 
$2.45; No. 14. $2.55; No. 15, $2.70; net 
cash, f.o.b., Montreal. 

Screws— Conditions are normal, with 
prices unchanged. We quote as follows: 
Kound head, bright, 82 1-2 per 
cent.: flat head, bright, 87 1-2 per cent.. 
brass, round head, 75 per cent.; brass. 
liat head, SO per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— Business is opening 
up well. We quote: 3-8 and smaller, 
(id to 10; 7-l(i and larger 55 and 5. 

Horse Nails— The new lists, coming in- 
to effect last week, are now ruling the 
trade. We give the following discounts: 
C brand, 40. 10 and 7 1-2 per cent.": 
M.b'.M. Co., 55 per cent.: P.B. brand. 55 
per cent 

Wire Nails— in anticipation of the 
Spring trade, orders of both sizes are 
now coming in. We still quote $2.15 
per keg, f.o.b. Montreal. 

Cut Nails— A sluggish market con- 
tinues. Our prices are $2.20 per keg, 
f.o.b. Montreal. 

Horseshoes— Our -rices remain as 
follows: P.B. New Pattern, base price, 
$3.50 per 100 lbs.. M.R.M Co. latest im- 
proved pattern iron shoes, light anil 
medium pattern No. 2 and larger, $3.65: 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; snow pattern. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90, No. 1 and smaller 
$1.15. Light si eel shoes, No. 2 and, larg- 
er, $4, No. 1 and smaller, $4.25: feath- 
erweight, all sizes. No. to 4, $5.60 
Toeweight, all sizes. No. 1 to 4, $6.85 
1 'a eking, up to three sizes in a keg, 10c. 
I er 100 pounds. More than three sizes. 

Sporting Goods -Guns and ammuni- 
tion are iif course a dead issue just now. 
Business in snowshoes and skates is 
heavy, but the turnover of toboggans 
lias been somewhat disappointing this 
season. We quote: Skates from 25c. to 
$2.50. according to quality.; snowshoes 
from $15 to $35 per pozen pairs, accord- 
ing to quality. 

Building Papers— The most important 
price change made during the week was 

30 



in building papers, sonic of which have 
been advanced. Inquiries for Spring de- 
liveries are, beginning to come in well. 
The new prices will be found in our 
•'Current Market Quotations." 

Cement and Firebrick Cement is very 
slow as yet, but the Spring trade is 
expected to open up yen- soon. Fire- 
brick, on the other ha ml, is moving very 
early this year, and large orders are 
being shipped out daily. We quote: 
$1.80 to $1.90; Belgium, $1.60 to $1.90 
per barrel ; ex-store, American, $2.00 to 
$2.10 ex-cars; Canadian Portland, $2.00 
to $2.05. Firebrick, English and Scotch, 
$17.00 to $21.00: American, $30 to $35; 
White Bros." Eng. cement, $1.80 in bags, 
$2.05 in barrels in round lots. 

Coil Chain— Our prices are as foi- 
lows: 5-16 inch, $4.25: 3-8 inch, $3.75; 
7-16 inch, $3.55: 1-2 inch, $3.35; 9-1R 
inch, $3.30; 5-8 inch, $3.20; 3-4 inch, 
$3.05; 7-8 inch, $3.00; 1 inch, $2.95. 

Shot— Prices are still net list. 

Sleigh Bells— Retailers are now get- 
ting vid of their stocks at a good rate, 
owing to the genuine Winter weather 
which the province is now experiencing. 
We quote as follows: Back straps, 
30c to $2.50; body straps, 70c. to $3.50: 
York Eye bells, common, 70c. to $1.50, 
pear shape, $1.15 to $2.00; shaft gongs, 
20c. to $2.50; Orelots, 35c. to $2.00; 
team bells, $1.80 to $5.50; saddle gongs, 
$1.10 to $2.60. 

Horse Blankets— Our trices are': Jute, 
unlined, $4.50; 3-4 lined, $9.50; full lin- 
ed, $12; 16-oz. Hessian, unlined, $6.50; 
3-4 lined, $11.50; full lined, $14, and 
up to $24; Kersey blankets, $9 to $21 ; all 
woo], $24, $30, $48 and $60. 



Ontario Hardware Markets. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East. 

Toronto, Jan. 12, 1906. 

With the exception of buiiditi"' paper, 
which has been advanced by some hous- 
es, there has been no changes in quo- 
tations this week. Several lines of build- 
ing paper are quoted at higher figures, 
as our revised current market quota- 
lions show, but it is uncertain whether 
the advance will be held to or not. 
Some definite information on this point 
is promised next week. 

Trade since the onening of the year 
has been remarkable for the month of 
January, travelers being surprised at 
the large orders retailers have been 
placing for present shipment. These 
orders include general lines, showing 
that buying before the holidays was 
very satisfactory. Booked orders for 
poultry netting, wire goods, garden tools, 
fishing tackle, and other seasonable 
»oods, for Spring delivery, are reported 



January 13, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



large, all indications being that a large 
s-eason 's business is ahead of us. 

Axes and Handles A good January 
trade is being dona. 

Cutlery — Sorting orders arc being re- 
ceived, but trade is not heavy a1 tins 
season. 

Sporting Goods— Skates are having a 
steady call, and snowshoes and tobog* 
gans are in fair demand. Shooting ma- 
terials are dead, but fishing tackle is 
being booked for Spring delivery in good 
quantities. 

Washing Machines— The outlook for 
nexl season's business is satisfactory. 

Chain - We are still quoting prices 
as follows: 1 inch, $6.50; 5-6 inch, 
$4.45; 3-8 inch, $3.85; 7-16 inch, $3.70: 
1-2 inch, $3.55; 9-16 inch, $3.45; 5-8 
inch, $3.35; 3-4 inch, $3.25. 

Extension and Step Ladders— Prices 
continue as follows: Step ladders 
at 10c. per foot for 3 to 6 feet, and 
lie. per foot for 7 to 10 feet ladders. 
Waggoner extension ladders, 40 per cent. 
off. 

Wire Goods — Orders for Spring de- 
livery are being booked in satisfactory 
quantity. Poultry netting is in good de- 
mand, and barb and coil spring wire 
is also picking up. On galvanized wire 
we -till quote: $2.42 1-2 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Wire Nails— A good trade is being 
done for this season. We -till quote: 
$2.15 per keg, f.o.b. Toronto. 

Cut Nails — A satisfactory volume 
of business is being done. We quote: 
$2.40 per keg, f.o.b. Toronto. 

Hoise Nails — Trade is quiet. Dis- 
counts remain the same. 

Horseshoes— Trade continues brisk, 
prices firm. We quote: P.B. base, $3.65; 
"M.R.M. Co., latest improved pattern" 
Iron shoes, light and medium pattern, 
No. 2 and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.05; snow No. 2 and larger. 
$4.05; No. 1 and smaller, $4.30; light 
steel shoes, No. 2 and larger, $4.15 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.40; featherweight, all 
sizes, to 4, $5.75; toe weight, all sizes. 
1 to 4, $7.00. If shipped from factory 
15c. less. 

Saddlery -Sleighbells, horse blankets 
and similar iroods are having a season- 
able sale. 

Screws — Advancing' prices in metals 
make the market very firm, but prices 
are unchanged. 

Rivets and Burrs — There have been 
no price changes, and trade is satisfac- 
tory for this season. 

Bolts and Nuts— Stocks are light and 
a heavy trade is looked for during the 
Spi ing. 

Cordage — Sorting orders are plenti- 
ful. We still quote: Manila, 15c; 
British manila, 11 l-2c.'; sisal, 10 l-2c. ; 
double lathyarn, 10 l-2c; single latb- 
varn. 10c; sashcord, "Hercules," 30c 
to 32c; "Star," 36c; cotton twine. 
3-ply, 24c; 4-ply, 29c; calking cotton, 
16 1-2 to 17c; cotton waste, colored. 
6 3-4c ; white, 9c 

Cement — A normal business is report- 
ed. We ouote; For carload orders 
f.o.b. Toronto, Canadian Portland. $1.90 
lo $2.00; American Portland, $1.90 to 
$2.00. For small orders ex warehouse. 



Canadian Portland, $2.10, American 
Portland, $2.10. 

Firebiick Pi ices cbut inue unchanged ; 
English anil Scotch firebrick, 27c. to 
30c; American low-grade, '22c. to 2">c. ; 
high-grade, 27 l-2c, to 37 1 2c. 

Building Paper— Manufacturers have 
been working on L906 prices, and have 
advanced several lines. The advance is 
not yet. general, however, and may not 
be adhered to. 

Fur Skins. 

No. 1. No. 2. No. 3. No. 4. 

Badger SO 50 SO 10 %.... «... 

Bear Mack 1 00 

" " 15 00 8 00 3 00 

" Yearlings 7 mi 5 oj 2 00 30 

Fisher 6 00 4 00 2 00 100 

Pox Red 2 60 I SO 50 20 

" Cross 5 00 ton '-'mi 60 

I.iiiv 4 00 2 75 I 'I 

Marten Dark 10 00 5 00 2 00 50 

Pale 4 00 2 75 125 50 

Mini Dark 5 00 4 00 100 OSS 

" Pale 3 25 2 00 100 25 

Muskrat.Ont. &. E.Fall 12 08 .... 03 

" N.W.T.ftW. " 11 07 .... 03 

Babbit o oi o ooj ... 

Raccoon 1 25 I) 70 30 10 

Skunk 150 100 50 20 

Weasel White 0.50 25 20 04 

Wolf Timber 150 75 40 

' Prairie 100 50 iO 

Wolverine 4 00 2 50 1 00 25 



Canadian Metal Markets. 

QUEBEC. 
office of Hardware am> Mf.tw., 
232 MoOiU Street, 

Montreal, Jan 12. lHirt 

With stock-taking just about finished, 
the Montreal metal merchants are now 
beginning to size up the prospects for 
1906 business more definitely than be- 
fore. At the present time, everything 
looks very favorable to another good 
year, especially as many firms which 
have been considered as well stocked 
up for the Winter, are already asking 
for advance shipments on their Spring 
orders. 

All the metals which showed a fall- 
ing off last week have recovered their 
strength again, and ill sonic cases, have 
exceeded their former price. Pig lead 
is lather an exemption to this rule, as 
it has seen several fluctuations during 
the past few days. At the time of writ- 
ing, the tone is slightly easier, but it 
is thought that an early recovery will 
be made. 

Ingot tin is- very firm at same figures 
a< were quoted last week, and it ap- 
peals to lie groins' still higher before 
long. Antimony is another metal which 
is on the upward move, having been 
advanced about I -4c. again this week'. 
Indeed, some dealers are asking higher 
figures than we are quoting, and are 
able to get them. 

Ingot zinc is also a little higher this 
week, as the demand, both in. this coun- 
try and in foreign markets, is showing 
surprising- strength. No advance has 
been declared in sheet zinc as yet, ow- 
ing to the fact that the source of sup- 
ply for the Canadian market is differ- 
ent from that of spelter. It is altogether 
likely, however, that next week will see 
a withdrawal of (trices for sheet zinc 
as well. 

Foreign mills turning out boiler tubes 
are still behind in their deliveries, but 
at the present time, the position is 
rather peculiar. In spite of the strong 

31 



condition just now it is likely that an 
r market will be reached within 

the next few weeks, or at any rale, a^ 
soeii as some of 1 lie mills ha\ mv t U 
out the full extent of their orders, en- 
ter the market again. 

The pig iron situation is rather in 
leresting, in spite of the fact that the 
majority of manufacturers are pi 

well protected for the Winter. Poi 
inquiries are now coming iii quite brisk- 
ly for late Winter, and early Spring 
shipments. The lone continue-, very 

steady, with a tendency to advance quo 

talions for odd lots. The demand in 

the L'nited States is keeping up woudei 
fully well for the time of year, with 
absolutely no sign of a let up. 

Canada Plates— Importers are of the 
opinion tliat prices will soon have to be 
advanced by the jobbing trade, as high 
ev figures are already' being asked for 
future shipments. We are now quot- 
ing: 52's, $2.60; 60's, $2.65; 75 's, $2.75; 
full polished, $3.75; galvanized, 52's, 
•+■4.10; <;n' s , $4.35. 

Copper This metal continues very 
linn at the same prices as were quoted 

last week, ami our figures remain as 

follows: Ingot copper, 20 l-2c to 21c. 
sheet copper, base sizes, 25c. 

Ingot Tin- A decidely higher ton- 
manifest this week. Tin is very steady 
at from :;<) l-2c. to -10c 

Pig Lead — Several fluctuations which 
have occured during the week have left 
the market somewhat weaker, but the 
condition is probably only a temporary 
one. Wo are still quoting from $4.75 
lo $4.80 per hundred lbs. 

Boiler Tubes— The state of ibis man 
kel has been fully described in our open- 
ing remarks. We quote: Rritish and 
American tubes, 1 1-2 inch. 8 l-2c. : 2 
inch, 8 l-2c; 2 1-2 inch. 10c; 3 inch, 
12c; 3 1-2 inch. 15 :Mc; 4 inch. 20c; 
5 inch, 45c. Price per foot net. 
. Pig Iron— Inquiries coming to band 
are most encouraging. There is a dis- 
position to ask higher prices for odd 
lot-. We still quote: 

"Dom.," No. i. S19 50 to52o.oodelivered Montreal. 

Usual difference in price for lower grades. 
Ferrona No. i $19 50 delivered Montreal. 

No. a 19 03 " 

No. 3 18 50 

No. 4 18.00 

Londonderry 20.50 " 

Carron No. 1 23.00 " 

(special) 22.00 

Suramerlee No. 1 23.50 

Clarence No. 1 20.C0 " 

No. 3 19.50 

Tool Steel— Our prices are: Colonial 
Black Diamond, 8c. to 9c: Sanderson's. 
8c. to 45c, according to grade; Jessop's. 
13c; Jonas & Colver's. H)c. to 20c: 
"Air Hardening," 65c. iter lb.; Con- 
queror, 7 l-2c; Conqueror I Huh Speed 
Steel, 60c. 

Merchant Steel — We are still quotingj 
Sleigh shoe. $2.17 1-2: tire. $2.27 1-2: 
spring, $2.75: toeealk, $2.82 1-2: ma- 
chinery iron finish, $2.27 1-2; ruled ma- 
chinery steel, $2.75: mild, $2.17 1-2 and 
upwards; square harrow tooth. $2.27 1-2. 
Net cash 30 days. Rivet steel quottd on 
application. 

Cold Rolled Shafting — We give fchfl 
following prices: 3-16 inch, to 1! inch. 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



January 13, 1906 



I; 5-16 inch, to 11-32 inch, $5.78; 

9 eh, lo 1 7-32 inch, $4.76; 9-16 inch, 

,;i inch, $4.08; 3 1-8 inch, to 3 7-16 

Inch $3.60; 3 1-2 inch, to 3 15-16 inch, 

$3.75; I inch, to I 7-16 inch, $4.08; 4 1-2 

inch, to \ 11-16 inch. $4.42. 

Galvanized Iron The turn over is 
very good, especially on the better 
grades We quote: Queen's Head, 
ige, $4.25; 26 gauge, $4.00; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.75; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.50; 
Apollo, 28 gauge, $4.10; 26 gauge, $3.85; 
22 and 24 gauge, $3.85; 16 to 20 gauge, 
$3.50: Fleur-de-Lis, 28 gauge, $4.10; 26 
gauge, $3.85; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.60; 16 
to 20 gauge, $3.35; Comet, 28 gauge, 
$3.85 ; 26 gauge, $3.60 ; 22 and 24 gauge. 
$3.35; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.10; Bell brand. 
28 gauce, $4.20 to $4.25; Gorbal's "Best 
Best." 28 gauge, $4.10. "Windmill 
Best," 28 gauge, $3.95; Sword and 
Torch, 28 gauge," $4.05; in less than case 
lots 25c. extra. 

Black Sheets— Our prices are: 28 
gauge, $2.40: 26 gauge, $2.35; 22-24 
gauge, $2.30; ■ 10-20 gauge, $2.30; 8-10 
gauge, $2.45. 

Anitomy— We are again advancing 
our prices this week, and prospects are 
favorable For another ascension in this 
metal, such as occurred during the past 
Summer. We quote : 14$c. to 14|c. 
for Cooksons. 

Tin Plates— Prices are still as follows 
Cokes, base size. 1C, 14 x 20, 
$4.00: charcoal, base size, 1C, 14 x 20, 
$4.25. 

Terne Plates— We quote as yet: $6.85. 

Ingot Zinc — Considerable strength has 
been manifest in this market during the 
week just past, and prices have been 
advanced accordingly. We quote for 
the present. 7 l-4c. to 7 l-2c. 

Sheet Zinc— Prices have not yet been 
changed, but an advance is expected 
next week. Our prices still are: 8c. in 
<a>ks; S l-4c in less than casks. 

Sheet Lead— We are quoting: 2 1-2 
lbs., ■') l-2c. by the roll: 3 lbs. and heav- 
ier, 5 l-4c. by the roll ; small quantities 
25c. per hundred lhs. extra. 

Bar Iron— The advance declared last 
week is being stiffly maintained, and we 
are still quoting $2.00 f.o.b. Montreal. 

Old Material— Wrought iron scrap 
continues in the same condition as for- 
merly, hut cast iron is in good demand, 
with price- firm. Reports from the rub- 
her markets indicate that the manu- 
facturers in the United States are either 
not busy, or are keeping out of the mar- 
ket for some other reason. It is hard to 
predict how prices may go. No change 
occurred in scrap zinc, both this 
metal and lead being still much inquired 
for. Stocks are scarce, and there is an 
upward tendency everywhere. Further 
advance- in copper have boosted the 
price also in brass scrap. We are quot- 
ing the following: Copper wire, 14 
3-46.; light copper, 13' 3-4c; heavy red 
brass, 13c; vellow brass, 9 3-4c; 
light brass, 7 l-2c: lead, 3c; zinc, 
4c.; machinerv cast scrap, $13; 
wrought scrap, $12: stove plate scrap, 
$11; mixed rags, 75c to 90c. per 100 lbs.; 
old rubbers, 7 l-4c. to 7 l-2c 



ONTARIO. 

i HBo< of II u; DTI u:i vsi' Mil \i„ 

Ill Front Street Klisl, 

Toronto, Jan. 12. 1906 

Brass has been advanced from 10 per 
cent, discount to net list, the only other 
advances made since last report being 
on old materials, dealers offering higher 
prices for both old copper and brass. 
Bar iron is still quoted at $1.95 net, 
or $2.00 with 2 per cent, off, but an 
advance is looked for at any time, job- 
bers being busy now in stock-taking. 

Trade during the week has been dull, 
January being unusually an inactive 
month. The feeling for Spring busi- 
ness is, however, very optimistic. 

Pig Iron — There is little business off- 
ering, but the mills are all hooked ahead 
for several months. We still quote: 

Middlesboro, f.o.b., Toronto 822 50 

Hamilton, No. 1, at furnace 20 00 

No. 2. " 19 50 

Midland, No. 1, " 20 00 

No. 2, " 19 50 

Radnor, at furnace 31 50 

Londonderry, f.o.b. Toronto 2150 

Bar Iron— The expected advance has 
not yet been made, and we are still 
quoting $2.00 base, f.o.b. Toronto, with 
discount of 2 per cent, net cash. 

Ingot Tin— Market continues active, 
and we still quote 40c per lb. 

Tin Plates— Jobbers report an active 
demand. Prices are linn. 

Galvanized Sheets— Conditions are un- 
changed, the demand being heavy at '.he 
same quotations. 

Brass— Recent advances in copper 
have been followed by higher quota- 
tions on brass. We, therefore, have to 
revise our quotations from 10 per cent. 
discount, to net list. 

Lead — Lead has fluctuated during 
the week, but quotations continue as 
follows: Pig lead, $4.85 per 100 lbs., 
and bar lead, $5.00 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter— Prices hold steady, with 
demand fair. We quote: 7 l-2c. 
per lb. for foreign and 5 1-2 to 5 3-4c. 
per lb. for domestic 

Copper— Buying of both sheet and 
ingot copper is quite brisk, with stocks 
not very large. We are quoting as fol- 
lows: Ingot copper, $20 per 100 lbs., and 
sheet copper, $25 per 100 lbs. 

Antimony— Conditions are about the 
same as last week, and we still quote 
15 l-2c 

Old Material— Advances have been 
made on old brass and copper, the de- 
man for which is brisk. Dealer's buy- 
ing prices are: Heavy copper and wire, 
15o. per lb.; light copper, 13c per lb.; 
heavy red brass, 13c per lb.; heavy 
vellow brass, lie. per lb.; light brass, 
8 l-2c. per lb.; tea lead, $3.00 per 100 
lbs.; heavy lead, $3.25 per 100 lbs.; 
^crap zinc, 4c per lb.; iron, No. 1 
wrought, $10.50, No. 2 wrought $3 to $5; 
machinery cast scrap, $15; stove plate, 
$10,- malleable and steel, $5; old rub- 
bers, 7c to 7 l-4c per lb.; country mix- 
ed rags, 75c per 100 lbs. 

Coal— Prices keep' very firm, and 
we still quote: Anthracite in cars 
at bridges, .orate, $5.50 per gross 
ton; pea, $3.75 per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.70; 3-4 inch, 

32 



$1.60, run of mine, $1.40; nut, $125: 
N.P. and S., $1.00: slack, 75c; box cars 
10c. per ton additional. 

Youghiogheny soft coal in cars, bond- 
ed at the bridges: 1 1-4 inch, $2.80; 3 I 
inch, $2.70; mine run, $2.60; slack, $2.35. 

For Manitoba, British Columbia and 
Maritime Provinces markets see pages 
following. 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

From Metal Market Report, January 11, 1906. 

PIG IRON — Cleveland warrants are 
quoted at 54s. 6d, and Glasgow stan- 
dard warrants at 53s 9d, making prices 
as compared with last week unchanged 
for Cleveland warrants and Id lower for 
standard warrants. 

TIN— Spot tin opened firm at £165 
5s., futures at £165 17s. 6d., and after 
sales of 300 tons of spot andi 200 tons 
of futures closed firm at £165 10s. for 
spot and £165 17s. 6d. for futures, mak- 
ing price as compared with last Week 
£2 10s. higher on spot and £2 10s. high- 
er on futures. 

COPPER — Spot copper opened easv at 
£79 15s., futures £79 2s. 6d., and after 
sales of 200 tons of spot and 250 tons 
of futures closed easy at £79 12s. 6d. 
for spot and £79 for futures, making 
price as compared with last week 10s. 
lower on spot and 15s. lower on futures. 

LEAD— The market closed at £17, 
making price as compared with last 
week 10s. lower. 

SPELTER— The market closed at £29 
5s., making price as compared with last 
week 2s. 6d. lower. 



UNITED STATES METAL MARKETS 

Advance proofs furnished Hardware and Metal By 
Tlu- Iron Age, January 11, 1906. 

The principal event of the week has 
heen the advance in prices on the great- 
er part of all the lighter finished pro- 
ducts. It amounts to $2 per ton on box 
annealed sheets, $1 per ton on blue an- 
nealed sheets, $2 per ton on galvanized 
sheets, 10c a box on tin plate, 10c a 
square on galvanized roofing and $1 pet- 
ton on wire products. 

There are further indications of a re- 
vival of buying of pig iron, although the 
movement is not yet quite general. 

How great the activity during the 
past year has been -is" reflected well by 
the figures of production of the United 
States Steel Corporation. During 1905 
the output of the blast furnaces of the 
constituent companies aggregated 10,- 
175,505 gross tons, as compared with 
7,975,530 gross tons in 1902, the pre- 
vious record year. The production of 
steel ingots reached the enormous total 
of 11,995,205 gross tons, as compared 
with 9,743,918 tons in the record year 
of 1902. 

It may be interesting to add that 
there have just been authorized exten- 
sions and improvements in plants by the 
corporation which will add very close to 
1,000,000 gross tons of pig iron, about 
535,000 tons of steel ingots and over 
760,000 tons of finished iron and steel 
to the annual capacity. This is exclusive 
of the enormous plant which is planned 
for the Chicago district. 

The output of coke and anthracite pig 
iron in December is shown by reports of 
production gathered to have gained only 
37,000 gross tons on that of November. 



January 13, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



British Columbia Trade News 

Vancouver, Jan. 5, 1006. 
Vancouver's building record has shown 
satisfactory growth for the year just 
completed. A total of almost $2-, 7 50,000 
in building permits was issued by the 
building inspector, as compared with a 
total for 1904 of about $2,000,000. So 
far as present indications go, the ycai 
just commenced will show no abatement 
of building activity. A number of new 
blocks and public buildings are now un- 
der construction and permits have al- 
ready been issued for several large 
blocks in growing portions of the busi- 
ness sections of the city. House-build- 
ing, too, has continued so far righl 
through the Winter, and numerous short 
spells of dry weather have greatly favor- 
ed the work. 

* * 
• 

In the clearing house returns for the 
year is given the concrete amount of in- 
crease in the financial transactions for 
the year. The total for the year was 
$88,686,740, an increase of over $14,- 
000,000 above 1904, which in its turn 
showed an increase of $8,000,000 over 

the total of 1903. 

* * 

Customs collections for 1905 for the 
port of Vancouver show a big increase, 
the figures being $1,654,857.81 in reve- 
nue collected. In 1904 the amount was 
$1,455,324.16. 

An increase of 31 per cent, in exports 
from this port is shown, the amount ex- 
ported being valued at $6,846,122. This 
is $2,167,211 more than the previous 

year. 

* • 
• 

In the mining industry the biggest ex- 
pectations have been almost realized. It 
was confidently hoped that shipments of 
ore from the mines of the Boundary dis- 
trict alone would this year total a mil- 
lion tons. Had it not been that the 
last week iii the year was a holiday 
week the ambition would have been rea- 
lized. As it was the figures reached 
928,352 tons, so that the million mark 
was in reach. The three smelters in the 
Boundary district, the Granby, the B. 
C. Copper Co. and the Dominion Copper 
Co., treated a total of 941,817 tons dur- 
ing the year. 

The output of the Rossland mines for 
the year was 323,000 tons, which is 
about the same as last year. 

The total coal output of the Vancou- 
ver Island mines for 1905 was 961,195 
tons. This was distributed as follows : 
From Wellington mines, 372,264 ; Co- 
mox mines, 429,057 tons ; Ladysmith 
mines, 210,081 tons ; Western Fuel Co., 
Nanaimo mines, 169,874 tons. This lat- 
ter mine was closed down some six 
months during the best season of the 

year. 

* * 

* 

The Wellington Colliery Co. has begun 
operations to open up a new coal field 
several miles from Wellington, where a 
splendid seam has been' discovered. The 
firm of R. Dunsmuir & Sons control 

the Wellington colliery. 

* * 

* 

Two districts in Northern British 
Columbia seem destined to be actively 
developed in a mining way next Spring. 
These are in the Windy Arm district 
near Tagish Lake and Lake Bennett, 
north- of Atlin camp, and the Telkwa 
Valley, close to Skeena River, in the 
section which is supposed to be in the 
line of progress projected by the Grand 



Trunk Pacific. The former proposition 
includes silver values of very high grade 
and in the Telkwa the copper prosped 
are equallj attractive. To improve the 
Telkwa districl there are large coal 
areas there, and all in such locations as 
to be easily developed by railway con 
struction. Many companies have been 
formed with the view of development 
work there next, Spring. 

In the Windj Arm district other finds 
besides silvei id native form are galena, 
argentite, pyrargite, and iron and arsen 
ical pyrites. The total distance from 
tidewater at Skagway to the new camp, 
Conrad City, on Windy Arm, is 79 
miles, 67 of which are by the White Pass 
Railway, and 12 miles on the lake from 
Caribou Crossing, at the foot of Bennett 
Lake, to Conrad City, oil Windy Arm, 
the centre of the new finds. This camp 
is predicted to be a very active centre 
early in the season, or as soon as navi- 
gation is opened, as the means of trans 
portation already exist, while the work 
of the past Summer has proven beyond 
cavil that valuable and extensive ore de- 
posits have been located. Mr. R. (!. 
McConnell, of the Dominion Geological 
Survey Department, makes an extensive 
and interesting report on the whole lo- 
cation. 

* 

In connection with the improvements 
of False Creek, Vancouver's second har- 
bor, Mr. Roy of the Dominion Public 
Works Department has completed his 
surveys and left for Ottawa. He will 
make his report there, but from what 
has been learned of his observations, 
there appears to be no difficulty in the 
way of dredging False Creek or Coal 
Harbor, the two portions of the water- 
front he examined. It is pointed out 
with respect to False Creek that if the 
city proceeds with reclamation work at 
the head of the creek, the Dominion Gov- 
ernment will no doubt make a deep 
channel in the lower part of the creek 
to give access to English Bay. Strong 
representations are being made to the 
civic authorities by many of the citizens 
urging immediate steps for this work. 

* * • 

The British Columbia Electric Co. 
announces that it will abolish connec- 
tion fees in installing light connections. 
* 

A number of employes of the N. 
Thompson Engineering Works have won 
a case against the assignee, whom they 
sued foi wages for work done after the 
assignment, aiid done at the instance of 
the assignee. The case turned on the 
adoption by the creditors of a resolution 
approving the action of the assignee in 
keeping the men at work. 

Some activity is shown in mining de- 
\ e lop men 1 on the coast close to Van- 
couver. Work is being done on Bo wen 
Island in English Bay and the force of 
men employed has recently been doubled 
On the Empress group, Howe Sound, 
close to the Britannia mine, a large 
force of men are engaged in development 
work. 

* * * 

Two smelters in the Boundary dislnrl 
have been closed by strikes of the em- 
ployes. They are the Dominion Copper 
Co.'s smelter at Boundary Falls and the 
B. C. Copper Co.'s smeiter at Green- 
wood. A question of making eight-hour 
shifts instead of twelve hours as at pre- 
sent caused the strike, which is expected 
to be settled shortly 

33 



Nova Scotia Trade News. 

Halifax, N.S., Jan. Hi, L906. 
All the jobbers are now busily engi 

in t&king stock and making a genuine 

clearing up for the opening ol the Spring 
trade, 'trade is quiet, as is usual at 

this season of the year, and there is no 
call for any special lines outsidi 
blacksmiths' supplies, 'flic season so fai 
has been exceptionally brisk for Hie 
blacksmithsj there being no snow what? 
evei in the city, and the ground being 
haul makes the demand good for caulks 
and horse shoes. Conditions in the 
country districts are entirely different, 
where there has been ample snow for all 
purposes and good sleighing for v.. 
This is all to the advantage of the lum 
bcnneii. Not for years have conditions 
been so favorable for lumbering opera- 
tions, and as a result enormous cuts are 
being made in some of the districts. 
The sledding is ideal, and the lumber- 
men arc taking every advantage of the 
open season and pushing the work. 



At Amherst last week the Robb En 
gineering Company entertained at din- 
ner at the Terrace Hotel their travelers, 
representatives, foremen and superin- 
tendents of departments. President D. 
W. Robb presided, and at length he out- 
lined the origin and progress of the 
company. Among those present were 
Mr. J. F. Porter, of Winnipeg, and Mr. 
Wm. McKay, of Toronto. One of the 
pleasant events of the evening was the 
presentation to D. W. Robb of a hand- 
some clock and candelabra by the mem- 
bers of the selling staff. Mr. Robb in 
referring to the companv's history said 
that on May 9, 1865 over forty years 
ago, the first sod was turned for the 
erection of a small foundry, which has 
since grown into the works' of the Robb 
Engineering Company. The original site 
consisted of two acres, and the first 
building to be erected was the foumli \ 
30x60 feet, with a monitor roof. In addi- 
tion a small machine shop, about 30 feet 
square, with engine and boiler house in 
the rear, was built. The first engine and 
boiler used for the machine shop was 
about 15-horse-power. Since then the 
growth of the company has been marvel- 
ous. New and extensive works have 
been established at Amherst and at 
Framingham, Mass., and branches open- 
ed at Montreal, Toronto and Winnipeg. 



Everything is booming at the Domin- 
ion Iron & Steel Co.'s mills at Sydney. 
In one day recently they put 700 steel 
rails through the process, placed them 
ready for market. This is the record 
foi one day's work (24 hours) since the 
opening of the mill. The company was 
under contract to the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way to furnish before the end of the 
year 25,000 tons of rails. I p to about 
the middle of December the nunibei ol 
tons shipped reached over 20,000, and 
then there was a rush to turn out the 
balance. The G.T.R. are so well pleas 
ed with the rails that they have placed 
a duplicate order with the company. The 
rails are of the heaviest type manufac- 
tured, weighing 80 pounds.' and 125 of 
them are required to lav one mile of 
road. The rails laid by the G.T.R. have 
undergone a most rigid test, and are 
considered a better product than any 
other kind used so far. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 



BEFORE you are many days 
older, you'll have a copy of 
our new Brush Book, — shows more 
kinds of better brushes than any 
supply house ever sent you yet — fact ! 
Right on the heels of the book 
vou'll probably see our salesman, — 
he may mention brushes to you, — 
please be good to him. 

If he and the book don't show 
you, — don't prove to you — that we 
can sell you more brush quality for 
every dollar than you ever bought 
before, don't be good to him, and 
do throw away the book. 

We have bought our stocks at 
prices that must have hurt some- 
body badly, — but don't you care for 
that. We have closed out some big 
makers for spot cash, — others we've 
taken whole outputs from in car- 
lots. 

Never had such a brush stock — 
never were fixed to quote so low for 
such values. Assortment is big 
enough for any dealer, — no matter 
what kind of a trade he sells, — 
prices are where you won't think 
twice of competition. Big talk — 
but true talk. 

And every brush we sell we guar- 
antee, — that means we replace any 
brush that any customer of- yours 
kicks about, if the kick is halfway 
reasonable. 

Please read the book, when it 
comes, — and talk to the man, when 
he comes. 

If you happen to want anything 
between now and then, our mail 
order department will take mighty 
good care of you, — it ships every 
order the day we get it, and the 
same old Stephens guarantee covers 
all it ships. 



Hardware and Metal Conditions in Manitoba. 



(Market quotations corrected by telegraph 



G. F. STEPHENS & CO. 



LIMITED 






WINNIPEG, CANADA 



Dealers arc now busy getting their 
stocks in tinier and business, as is na- 
tural at this time of year, is quiet, 
though a brisk Spring trade is looked 
for shortly. Builders' supplies are in 
good demand, the mild weather allow- 
ing of considerable outside work, and 
the painl and glass trade is reported 
good. Prices hold very firm, but there 
are very few. changes to note this week. 
In the ammunition list the discounts on 
Dominion R.F., Dominion G.F., pistol 
and Dominion military, for t lie territory 
from Calgarv to Edmonton and from 
Edmonton to Battleford, are now (it), 
30 and 4(1 per cent, respectively, but for 
the balance of the west they remain un- 
changed. 

Game Traps— A few game traps are 
still selling. Prices are unchanged. We 
quote : 

H. &N., discount 50 and 5 p.c. 

Victor, " 66?i p.c. 

Newhouse, " 35 P- c - 

Bear $7 each 

Lanterns— The market is "open" and 
it is hard to quote with anything ap- 
proaphing to exactitude. The average 
prices are about as follows: 

Cold blast lanterns $$ 25 per doz. 

Coppered cold blast lanterns 7 25 

Cold blast dash " ...... 7 75 j- 

Lift Lanterns 4 25 

Bluestone— Price for 190G delivery is 
$6.50 per cwt. 

Wire— Prices are steady. We quote: 

Barbed wire, 100 lb S3 °° 

Plain galvanized, 6 to 8.. $3 39 9-- $* 5° a 9° 

10 3 50 12.. 3 10 

' 13 3 20 14.. 3 9° 

15 4 45 l6 -- 4 6° 

Plain twist 3 o0 

Staples 1 5° 

Oiled annealed wire, ic. $2 96 n.. $j 02 

" " 12 . . 3 10 13 . . 3 20 

' " 14.. 3 3° if ■• 3 45 
Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horseshoes— Prices have been steady 
since the recent advance in steel shoes. 
Quotations are as follows: 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 $4 6 5 

No. 2 and larger .... 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 4 9° 

No. 2 and larger 4 6 5 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 5 °° 

No. 2 and larger 475 

Horsenails— Discounts are as follows: 
"C" brand, 40, 10 and 7 1-2 per cent., 
"M" brand and other brands, 55 and 
60 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

Wire Nails— The price has been steady 
since the recent decline to $2.60 per keg. 

Cut Nails— Price, $3.00 per keg, base 
price. None selling because of the low 
price of wire nails. 

Pressed Spikes— Prices are firmly held 
at following quotations: 

Pressed spikes, y t x 5 and 6 $4 60 

5-6 x s, 6 and 7 4 25 

" " Yi x 6, 7 an,d 8 4 10 

" 7-16 x 7 and 9 4 00 

" " % x 8, 9, to and 12 3 90 

^i x ioandi2 375 

34 



lip to 12 a.m. Friday, Jan. 12, 19015.) 
Office of Hardware and Mktai. 

Room 511, Union Bank Building, 

Winnipeg, Man. 

Screws — No change in price. Demand 
continues brisk at following unchanged 
discounts: 

■screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 

Nrts rnd Bolts— Discounts are un- 
changed and continue as follows: 

Boks>, carnage, Ji or smaller 60 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, H and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

" 7-i6andover 55P-C. 

Bolts, tire 65 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 p.c. 

Sleigh sh( e bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55P-C. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2}4c " 

Hex " case lots 3c. 

" smaller lots 2&C " 

Rivets— Discounts continue as follows: 

Rivets, iron 60 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

." No. 12 37 

Coil Chain— Unchanged in price. We 
quote: 

Ooil chain — 

3-16 inch $) 25 yi inch ... $7 20 

5-16 inch .... 5 20 % inch .... 4 60 

7-16 inch 4 45 % inch 4 30 

y% inch 410 H inch 4 00 

Shovels— Discounts on spades and 
shovels continue 40 and 5 per cent. 

Harvest Tools— Discounts are now 60 
and 5 per cent. 
Axe Handles— Quoted as follows: 

Axe handles, turned, s.g.hickory, doz $3 15 

No. r 1 90 No. 2 1 60 

Octagon extra. 230 Net 1 60 

Axes— Prices are quoted as follows: 

Bench axes, discount off list 40 p.c. 

Broad " " " 25 p.c. 

Royal Oak, per doz $ 6.25 

Maple Leaf, " 8.25 

Model " 8.50 

Black Prince " 7.25 

Blick Diamond " 9.25 

Standard Flint Edge, per doz 8.75 

Copper King, per doz 900 

Columbian, 10.75 

Handled axes, North Star, per doz 7.75 

" Black Prince, per doz 9.25 

" " Standard Flint Edge, per doz.. 10.50 
" " Copper King, per doz n. co 

Butts— The discount on wrought iron 
butts is 70 per cent. 

Churns — The discounts from list prices 
are 45 and 5 per cent. 

Chisels— Quoted at 70 per cent, off list 
prices. 

Auger Bits— Discount on common 
auger bits is 65 per cent. 

Blocks — Discount on steel blocks is 
35 per cent, off list prices; on wood, 55 
per cent. 

Fittings— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows : 

Wrought Couplings 60 p.c. 

Nipples 65 and 10 p.c. 

T'sand elbows 10 p.c. 

Malleable bushings 50 p.c. 

Malleable unions 60 p.c. 

Grindstones— The price is now 1 3-4c. 
per lb. 



January 13, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



Fork Handles— The discount is 40 per 
cent, from list prices. ■ 

Hinges— The discount in light "T" 
and strap hinges is 65 per cent, off list 
prices. 

Hooks— Prices are quoted as follows: 

Brush hooks, heavy, per doz $8.75 

Grass " per doz 1.70 

Draw Knives— The discount is 70 per 
cent, from list prices. 

Rules— Discounts are 50 and 10 per 
cent. 

Washers— On small quantities the dis- 
count is 35 per cent.; on full boxes it is 
40 per cent. 

Wringers— Prices are as follows: 

Royal Canadian, per doz $30.00 

R. B. , per doz 34-75 

Files— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
io vvs : 

" Arcade " 75 p. c. 

" Black Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62 V4 p.c. 

Building Paper— The big rush is of 
course over, but there is still a steady 
sale at unchanged prices. We quote : 

Joliette, plain 40c. 

'' tarred 65c. 

Cyclone, plain 55c. 

tarred 80c. 

Anchor, plain 55c. 

" tarred 65c. 

Pure fibre, plain 6or. 

" " tarred 80c. 

Tinware, Etc.— We quote again as fol- 
lows: 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 ana 10 p.c. 

" plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37 % p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c, 

Imperial 6d p.c. 

Cordage— The price is steady since the 
recent advance. We quote as follows. 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 11 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 75 

Lath varn 11 25 

Solder— Quoted now at 24c. per lb. 
with concessions for large quantities. 
Vises— Prices are quoted as follows: 

" Peter Wright," 30 to 34 i4V4c per lb. 

35 to 39 14c. 

" 40 and larger 13HC. " 

Anvils— "'Peter Wright" anvils are 
selling at lie. per lb. 

Power Horse Clippers— The "1902" 
power horse clipper is selling at $12, 
and the "Twentieth Century" at $6. 
The "1904" sheep shearing machines 
are sold at $13.60. 

Ammunition, Etc.— Shot has been ad- 
vanced 25 cents per cwt. Other prices 
and discounts are unchanged. We quote: 
Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.l* . 

50 and 5 p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 20 p.c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. 33H p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Dominion Eley's and Kynoch's soft, 
12 gauge. 

black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge. 1750 

soft, 10 gauge 19 50 

chilled, 10 gauge 2050 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 7 00 

Chilled 7 50 

Powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton 475 

F.F.G., Dupont's 500 



WINDOW GUARDS, 

OFFICE RAILING, 
IRON GATES, 

WIRE FENCING, 

COAL SCREENS, 

SPRING BEDS 

AND MATTRESSES 

MUNRO WIRE WORKS, Limited 



WINNIPEG, MAN 



NEW GLASGOW, N S. 



ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

AND ARCHITECTS' SUPPLIES, ETC. 

We carry a complete line of WINSOR & NEWTON'S 
and other hading manufacturers' goods in stock. Ask for 
our new catalogue. 

THE WINNIPEG PAINT AND GLASS CO., LIMITED 

WINNIPEG, CANADA 



WINNIPEG CEILING and ROOFING CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Corrugated Roofing and Siding, Metal 

Ceilings, Cornices, Etc. 

WINNIPEG, - MAN. 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, fid. and 1». Canisters 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN 0AKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, Lonflon, England 

Agent: 

JOHN F0RMAN, - 644 Craig Street . 

MONTREAL. 



Ask your customers 

if they don't need new pumps. 
If they do sell them our 

Standard Anti-Freezing Pumps 

They'll appreciate getting a 
pump that doesn't have to be 
thawn out every zero morning. 



— MoDougall Pumpi 
—Made In Canada. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices 



The 

R. McDougall Co. 
Limited. 

Gait, Ont. 




Standard Lanterns 
for 1906 



Banner Cold Blast Lantern (See New Design) 
Leader Cold Blast Lantern, 
Climax Safety Tubular Lantern, ' 



SAMPLES OF ABOVE READY FEBRUARY 1ST. 
For sale by all prominent jobbers of Hardware and Crockery. 

The " Banner" and " Leader" Lanterns are both warranted Wind-proof, 
and, as usual, surpass all others for quality and construction. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

ONTARIO LANTERN AND LAMP CO., "■'"» Hamilton, Ont. 

36 



Hardware ind Metal 



THE MARKETS 



January 13, 1906 



Iron and Steel— Prices are quoted as 
loll. 

0.11 non ( basis ) 

Swedish iron (basis) 

Sleigh shoe steel 

-Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel , Black Diamond , I oo lb 

Jessop 



2 6o 
4 75 
a 75 

3 25 
3 50 
9 5° 

i? 00 



Black Sheets — No change in price. We 
quote as before: 



Black M,< c;s, 10 to 16 gauge, ioo lb. 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 gauge 

2* gauge 

28 gauge 



3 5° 
3 75 

3 9° 

4 00 
4 10 

Galvanized Iron— The market is 
steady at the recent advance. We 

quote: 

Apollo, 1 6 trauge 3 9° 

1 8 and 20 gauge 1 10 

*2 and 24 gauge 4 45 

26 gauge 440 

28 gauge 4 65 

30 gauge or io*i oz 4 95 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 461 

26 gauge 4 65 

28 " 4 90 

Tin Plates— We now quote as follows: 

l lupiate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box .... 9 50 

IX " TI 50 

XXI " .... 13 50 

Terne Plates -Quoted at $9.00. 
Canada Plates— We quote: 

Canada plate, 18x21,18x24 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 

Canadapiate, full polished 



3 5o 

3 75 

4 25 

Sheet Zinc— The price is now $8.50 
for cask lots, and $9.00 for broken lots. 

Pig Lead— Pi? lead is now quoted at 
$5.00. ' 

Iron Pipe— Prices are still quoted as 
follows: 

Black iron pipe, 'A inch .... 

X " 

Black iron pipe, H inch 

K ■■ 



1% 



2 s 

2 85 

3 '5 

4 00 

5 75 

785 

9 4° 

12 90 

Petroleum and Gasoline— Prices are 
quoted now as follows: 

Silver Star, per gal 21'Ac. 

Sunlight " 22HC 

Eocene 24 V4 c. 

Pennoline 25 'Ac. 

Crystal Spray " 2454c. 

Silver Light 22 'Ac. 

Gasoline, y-72 (Engine) 25 Vic 

tin barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg.) 

Paints, Oils and Turpentine — There is 
an average trade for the present sea- 
son. Prices are steady. We quote: 

White lead (pure) {650 

Bladder putty, in bbls o 02V4 

' ' in kegs o 02 y t 

Turpentine, pure in barrels 100 

Less than barrel lots 1 09 

Linseed oil, raw o 59 

Boiled o 62 

Window Glass— We quote: 

16-oz. O.G , single, in 50-ft. boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches $2.25 

26 to 40 2-4° 

16-oz. O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases— 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to 40 425 

41 to 50 4-75 

51 to 60 " 5-25 

61 to 70 " 5-75 



21-oz.C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases — 

26 to 40 united inches 7.35 

41 to 50 8.40 

51 to 60 9.45 

61 to 70 10.50 

71 to 80 u-55 

81 ti 85 12.60 

86 to 90 14-75 

16 to 95 17.30 

6 to 100 " 



New Brunswick Trade News 

St. John, Jan. 8, 1906. 
Though the chronicling of the doings 
m1 the Tariff Commission may not, 
strictly speaking, come within the 
scope of Hardware and Metal, it will 
not be amiss to tell something of the 
session of the Commission here, so far 
as it concerned the hardware interests 
especially. 



One of the first gentlemen to speak 
before the commissioners here was Mr. 
J. Sutton Clarke, of St. George. Mr. 
Clarke is not a hardwareman; he is, 
among other things, a packer of canned 
fish. His purpose is appearing before 
the Commission was to present a re- 
quest that tin plate should be put on 
the free list. Increase in the tin plate 
duty, he said, would make for propor- 
tionate increase in the cost to consum- 
ers. Hon. Mr. Fielding spoke at this 
stage of a request previously made to 
the Commissioners, that machinery 
used in the manufacture of fish cans 
should be placed on the free list also. 



Mr. W. S. Fisher spoke on behalf of 
the manufacturers' association. He 
expressed appreciation of the Govern- 
ment's action in having the Commis- 
sion formed. Mr. Fisher then com- 
mented on the fact that the importa- 
tion of United States made stoves in- 
to the Northwest is increasing. Under 
existing tariff conditions there is dan- 
ger of further increase in these im- 
portations. 

* , * 

Mr. Charles McDonald expressed the 
opinion that the tariff does not figure 
greatly in the general run of the busi- 
ness done by the members of the asso- 
ciation. He gave it as his view, also, 
that the preferential tariff should ap- 
pl" solelv to goods brought through 
Canadian ports. (A resolution to this 
effect was recently passed by the local 
branch of the manufacturers' associa- 
tion.) Mr. McDonald would so arrange 
matters as to add 10 per cent, to the 
tariff, take off the one-third to the 
general importer, and give an addi- 
tional 10 per cent, off to persons who 
bring in their goods through Canadian 
ports. 

* * * 

Mr. lames Pender expressed satisfac 
lion with the present tariff. Barbed 
and galvani/.ed wire, he said, might be 
placed on the list of dutiable articles. 
A duty on these wires would, Mr. Pen- 
der contended, lead several concerns, 
among them his own, to go into their 
manufacture. He also made the point 
that Canadian railroads should be 
made to give such freight rates as 
would enable eastern manufacturers to 
enter the western markets in competi 

36 



tion with United States manufacturers. 
Mr. William Britckhof, of the Port- 
land Rolling Mills, asked that the 
dumping clause be not applied to im- 
portations of steel billets. 



The Morris Safety Nut Company. 
Limited, has been made certain conces- 
sions by the city and will shortly be- 
gin to enlarge its plant here, it plans 
to instal a modern nut and bolt plant, 
in a communication addressed to the 
city council the company stated its in- 
tention of putting up large furnace and 
hearth buildings, a rolling mill, a nut 
and bolt building, wareroom and power- 
room. The company has been in op- 
eration for a year, and already does a 
good business. The nut of which it 
makes a specialty is the invention of 
a St. John man. 



TRAVELER'S NARROW ESCAPE. 

George Ramsden, who represents Cav- 
erhill, Learmont & Co. in Eastern On- 
tario, had a narrow escape from serious 
injury last week. Mr. Ramsden, whose 
home is in Port Hope, was returning 
from a trip east, and on alighting from 
the train took his seat in the Queen's 
Hotel closed hack. While the hackman 
was in the baggage room the horses 
started off, and they had gained great 
speed before Mr. Ramsden realized that 
they had no driver. He immediately 
lowered the window and opened the 
door, swinging himself out of the cab 
with, fortunately, no further mishap 
than a thorough plastering of mud. The 
horses were finally stopped at the 
Queen's Hotel. 

Anyone who has visited Port Hope 
will appreciate the danger in which Mr. 
Ramsden was placed, especially in view 
of (he fact that trains were shunting 
011 the Midland Division tracks at that 
time. 



IMPROVEMENTS TO "M. R. M/' 

Pursuing their policy of keeping up 
with modern development, the Montreal 
Rolling Mills Co. are laying plans, and, 
in fact, the work is now well under 
way, for a new and modern Butt-weld 
pipe mill. 

This mill will be located on the pro- 
perty acquired some years ago with the 
Hodgson iron & Tube Co. when this 
concern was absorbed bv the Montreal 
Rolling Mills Co. 

The equipment of the mill will be up- 
to-date in every respect, and, in point of 
efficiency, will be equal to the best of 
American mills. The improvements will 
involve an expenditure of from $125,000 
to $150,000. 



CHANGES IN DOMINION STEEL. 

As announced some time ago. Mr. 
Graham Fraser has retired from the 
general managership of the Dominion 
Iron & Steel Co., and has been suc- 
ceeded by Mr. P. Jones,, formerly gen- 
eral sales agent of the company. This 
has occasioned a general round of pro 
motions. Mr. J. Percy McNaughton, 
who has for the past few years been 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Stationed at Montreal, lias boon pro 

moted to be general sales agent, with 
headquarters it Sydney. To till the 
position of western sales agent thus 
made vacant, Mr. Phillips Williams, 
formerly eastern sales agent, has been 
promoted to the Montreal office. 

During the past week or two Mr. Mc- 
Naughton has been introducing Mr. 
Williams on his territory, and both 
gentlemen have been receiving congratu- 
lations on their respective promotions. 



•good roofing 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS 

When sending catalogues for review, manu- 
facturers would confer a favor by pointing out 
the new articles that they contain. It would 
assist the editor in writing the review. 



Lithographed Tinware. 

A sample of the work done by the 
Thomas Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal, 
which does them credit is their 1906 
calendar, it being a small 4 1-2 x (i 1-2 
inch embossed and lithographed sheet of 
tin, on which is printed a calendar, the 
illustration being a beautiful peacock 
in variegated colors. The calendar is 
really a work of art and dealers who 
have not received one will find it worth 
their trouble in sending for a sample, 
mentioning Hardware and Metal, of 
course. The Davidson Co. also got out 
neat invitation and menu "cards" on 
tin. on the occasion of their ninth annual 
banquet and re-union of travelers, etc, 
on Dec. 29. 



Nail and Tack Catalogue. 

A bound hook, of pocket size, has been 
sent to the trade by the Peck Rolling 
Wills. Montreal, giving their latest cata- 
logue of iron and steel plates, horse- 
shoes, spikes, nails, tacks, etc. The 8(5 
pages contain many illustrations and 
much tabulated matter of interest to 
the hardware trade. This paper should 
he mentioned in any letters of inquiry 
sent the company. 



Calendars All Gone. 

Purvis Bros., Sudbury^ wish Hardware 
and Metal to announce that the demand 
for their calendars has been so great thai 
the supply has been exhaust oil. 



Mechanics' Tools. 

Russell <x Irwin Manufacturing Co., 
New Britain, Conn., are supplying the 
trade with catalogue and price sheets 
of the James Swan Co 's premium me- 
chanics' tools, the Russell & Irwin Co. 
being sole agents for the latter com- 
pany. The catalogue contains over 70 
pages showing illustrations of various 
Tools and tool cabinets, both cutting an 1 
boring tools being described and prices 
on them quoted. The manufacturers 
will send copies to any hardware mer- 
chants who have not yet added this cata- 
logue to their file. Mention this paper 
in any correspondence. 



"Eastlake" Metallic Shingles will surely interest your neighbor 
who has just had the wood shingles on his roof ripped off by 
lightning. 

No wise man will ever want to use wood shingles again when 
the lightning, fire, rust and storm resisting qualities of 'Eastlake" 
Metallic Shingles are once made evident to him. 

All around you new buildings are going up and old ones being 
repaired. Why let other dealers supply the shingles, etc., when 
the trade, at a good profit, is yours if you will go after it and 
show people who have given the matter little thought, the advan- 
tages of "Metallic" building materials over wood ? 



OUR NEW We have just issued the most complete 

$10 OOO Catalogue ever offered to the Metal Trade. 

__ '_. _.^,.._ It is a veritable encyclopaedia of all that's 
CATALOGUE prac t,Val and beautiful in the Art Manipu- 
lation of Sheet Metal. Book contains 440 pages, superbly 
bound and illustrated. We send it free upon request, to 
any builder, contractor or dealer of responsibility. 

THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. 

OF CANADA, Limited 

(Established Twenty Years) 

Toronto and Winnipeg 



We also manufacture: 

" Metallic " Ceilings and Wall Plates 
" Metallic " Cornices, Skylights and 

Ventilators 
" Metallic " Sheet Metal Fronts 
" Metallic" Siding, (Stone, Brick, etc.i 
"Irrtpervia" Fireproof Windows 
" Empire " Metallic Shingles 
" Metallic " Crestings and Finials 
"Metallic " Corrugated Iron 
"Hayes" Metallic Lathing 
" Metallic " Eavet rough and Conductor 

Pipe 
" Metallic" Pressed Zinc Ornaments 
"Richardson's" Pressed Metal Doors 

and Sheet Metal Building Materials 

of every description. 

401 



The Village Blacksmith. 

One of the world's famous pictures, 
"The Village Blacksmith," has been 
reproduced on a calendar, which Ludger 
Gravel, of Montreal, is sending to his 
friends in the trade. The picture is in 
natural colors and is an excellent repro- 
(Mi'-tion the original. Mr. i> ravel 
n ;akes._a specialty of blacksmith's sup- 
plies which -makes the calendar most ap- 
propriate as well as a nice adornment 
to any hardw areman 's store. Kp 
doubt Mr. Gravel will be please. 1 to 
send a copy of the calendar to any 
hardwareman who will drop him a card. 



1906 Calendars. 

Three fine calendars received during 

the past week were from the John Mor- 
row Machine Screw Co., Ingersoil, the 
Capewell Horse Nail Co., Toronto, and 
E. K. Spinney, wholesale hardware and 
iron merchant, Yarmouth, N.S. AH 
three are meritable productions, the two 
first mentioned heing typical of the class 
of business the companies are engaged in. 
end the last being a highly colored pic- 
ture of a female beauty, the color fea- 
ture being strong enough to indicate 
that a full stock of colors is carried at 
the Spinney warehouses. Readers who 
send for copies of the above should 
mention this paper. 



"Good Cheer." 

\ wreath of holly leaves and berries, 
tied with red ribbon and encircling the 
words "Good Cheer," made an appro- 
priate design on the cover of an em- 
bossed card sent out to customers by the 
James Stewart Mfg. Co., manufacturers 
of '"'Good Cheer!' stoves and ranges, 
Woodstock and Winnipeg. The card 

37 



wished customers the season's greetings 
and was a suitable reminder of the holi- 
day season. 



Two Fine Catalogues. 

The Pedlar People, Oshawa. have just 
issued two elaborate catalogues describ- 
ing their sheet metal building material. 
No. 14 (' deals with ceiling and wall de- 
signs, chiefly, and comprises L20 pages, 
8 x Id inches in size, and including sev- 
eral hundred illustrations, many of them 
being full page size, and giving an ac- 
curate idea of the beautiful designs 
manufactured for decorating the inter- 
ior of buildings of all kinds. Views of 
several buildings in which Pedlar metal 
lath or interior decorations have been 
used, are also given. Catalogue No. 14 
R is devoted to shingles, roofings, sid- 
ings, store fronts, metal lath, cornices, 
etc. It contains 112 pages, the book be- 
ing gotten up in pocket size. It is 
equally well illustrated as its companion. 
work, and in addition to the cuts, full 
printed descriptions are given in both 
hooks. The covers are uniform in a yel- 
lowed colored stiff paper. Accompany- 
ing the catalogues was a neat card on 
which is printed photographic repro- 
ductions of the likenesses of Henry Ped- 
lar, George Henry Pedlar, sr., and 
George Henry Pedlar, jr.. whose enter- 
prise has resulted in the growth of their 
extensive business, seven branch offices 
now doing: business in selling the pro- 
duct of their factory. The catalogues 
can he procured by sending a post ear-.l 
reouesting that thev be mailed. This 
offer should be mentioned on the card. 



A five-storey temperance hotel is to 
be built at Winnipeg, a site having been 
bought for about $l").d00. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 



INVESTIGATION INTO TACK ASSOCIATION. 

Continued from page 23. 



Discouraging Factors. 

In September, 1893, a letter was 
written to the Montreal Rolling .Mills. 
to the effect that if Messrs. Taylor. 
were permitted to sell at 
the United States price it will tend to 
disorganize the association. 

(tn September 27, 1893, the secretary 
wrote the Montreal Rolling .Mills re the 
complaint that Messrs. S. R. Foster & 
had — . * 1 1 1 to Kos> & Co.. and 
Messrs. Prescott, allowing them }'2'. 
per cent., and informing the Montreal 
Rolling Mills that that firm had bi 
them not t«i press the matter further. 
promising that it should not occui 
again. 

The secretary wrote Foster & Son a 
strong letter, saying : "We hope this 
i- the last ease of the kind with which 
we shall have to deal, as these matters, 
however small, tend t.> disorganize the 

assi icfation. " 

In April. 1893, the secretary informed 
the Ontario Tack Co. that in conse- 
quence of an addition to the jobbers' 
five firms had sent in notice of 
withdrawal from the association, unless 
the additions were struck off again. 

Rebates to Jobbers. 

In April. 1893, members were inform- 
ed by letter that carpet tacks might be 
sold at 55 per cent, off list prices, less 
rebate to jobbers of 12A per cent., less 

5 per cent, for cash in 30 days. 

The secretary wrote to Samuel, Ben- 
jamin & Co., advising them that rebate 
to purchasers of $1,000 worth of tacks 
was to be 12.', and 2.1 per cemt., saying 
also that the secretary-treasurer did 
not think it prudent to publish this 
price on the official list of the associa- 
tion. The same terms were to be given 
to those taking $250 or $500 worth. 

On June 27, 1803, notice was sent to 
all members of the cancellation of the 
agreement between the association and 
Messrs. Reed & Wilson governing: the 
purchase and sale of tacks. 

On Julv 4. 1893. the secretary wrote 
to the Montreal Rolling Mills acknowl- 
edging their letter about Caverhill, 

6 Learmont, and TTobbs Hardware Co., 
and askine if thev were agreeable to 
let the iobbers sell at 7.\ per cent, dis- 
count off $250 within 6 months. 

At the meeting held in June, 1893. it 
was determined that the jobbers' lists 
should be abolished, and a quantity 
discount instituted instead. 

Competition Shown. 

In October. 1893, the Ontario Tack- 
Co. asked permission to sell at a cer- 
tain price, and the secretary replied : 
'We do noi -ay that we can give you 
permission to sell tacitly at 10 per 
cent, discount." 

On August It. 1803. the Massey- 
ffarris Co. were written to. informing 
them that their name should b« 
brought tin at the next meeting for a 
place on the iobbers' list. 

Mr. Currv : T thought the jobb 
were abolished." 

Mr. Tilley : "Thev were abolished, 
but persons who used a certain class of 

• e kept note of. " 



Special Privileges Given. 

On October 19, 1893, a letter was 
written to the Ontario Tack Co. and 
signed bj all the members, authorizing 
them to sell Aaron & Co. tacks at a 
special price. 

Mr. Curry : "] have read this to 
show that everything must be done by 
consent of the association. Individuals 
had no discretion." 

On November 7. L893, the secretary 
wrote to the Montreal Rolling Mills; 
living consent of the association to 
their request lor permission to give a 
credit note to all their customers tor 
some sales which had already been 
made, as they were in ignorance that 
the price had 1 been lowered. 

In December, 189:!. members were in- 
formed that Messrs. Pender & Co., St. 
John, have signed the association 
agreement to maintain prices. 

Preferred Lists. 

In March, 1894, Messrs. Nowell & 
Dagnall requested the association to 
place them on the preferred list. The 
secretary wrote. saying that goods 
were all sold on quantity basis, and 
consequently there was no preferred 
list. 

Lower Prices Offered. 

On March 20, 1894, the secretary 
again wrote to the Hobbs Hardware 
Co. with reference to their alleged offer 
to customers in Manitoba and North- 
west Territories, of tacks at prices 5 
per cent, below those of the associa- 
tion,^ and also tacks in kegs at an ex- 
tra 7\ per cent, discount. 

On April 26, 1894, the secretary wrote 
to the Montreal Rolling Mills, saying 
that he had heard from the Hobbs 
Company, and asked the Montreal Roll- 
ing Mills if thev could eive him any 
further information. The Hobbs Hard- 
ware Co. had written, saving that this 
o'Ter had been made because their 
travelers had been unable to call in per- 
son, but that in no instance had the 
offer been accepted. Thev had actually 
sold nothing except at the association 
nrices. 

Open Market Suggested. 

On June 24, 1894, a letter was written 
to the Pillow-Hersey Co. mentioning 
1hat Messrs. Woodall and Pender & Co. 
were manufacturers of shoe tacks. "They 
must join the association or shoe tacks 
must he made an open market." ran the 
letter. On June 12, 1894, a letter had 
been written to Mr. Woodall asking him 
1o join the association, but he never re- 
ceived the communication. 

On June 15, 1894, the Montreal Roll- 
ing Mills were informed that members 
had agreed to invite Mr. Woodall and 
Messrs. Pender & Co. to join the asso- 
ciation. Mr. Pender was asked to make 
a deposit of $50 subject to forfeiture for 
violation. 

A telegram was sent to the Montreal 
Polling Mills on June 30, 1894, saying, 
"Whitton willing to make up to 1 Inch 
65, wire him what you decide." 

In July, 1891, the secretary wrote to 
the Ontario Tack Comnany askine them 
whether galvanized tacks were sold sull- 
ied to association rules. lie stated in 

38 



his letter that they were being sold at 
a discount of 30 per cent, and that he 
could not find that they were mentioned 
as being within the compass of the as- 
sociation's rules. 

In July, 1891, the Graham Nail Works 
agreed to abide by the juice fixed by the 
association for best flour barrel nails. 

Fines Reduced. 

From a Letter written by the secre- 
tary to one of the manufacturers at this 
time it appeared that the penalty for 
infringement of the association rules had 
been reduced from $300 to $250. 

Col. Denison remarked that the rules 
of the association did not seem to be as 
immutable as the laws of the Medes and 
Persians. 

Mr. Tilley : "The penalty for viola- 
tion is now $100." 

On July 20, 1894, the Peck-Benny Co. 
wrote the secretary with regard to' their 
quotation of Caverhill, Learmont &' Co. 
of galvanized roofing nails, saying that 
they had booked the order in perfect 
good faith, believing that article to be 
without the scope of the association's 
rules. Under the circumstances they 
would withdraw their quotation to that 
firm, giving a discount of 30 per cent, 
and would not quote that price any 
more. 

The secretary wrote to the Pillow- 
llersey Co. informing them that the 
Montreal Rolling Mills were not the of- 
fenders in regard to the sale of galvan- 
ized roofing nails. 

At a meeting of the association held 
on June 26, 1894, the secretary was in- 
structed to ask Mr. Pender to deposit 
his cheque for $50 in the funds of the 
association in case of violation. In re- 
ply Mr. Pender said that he had not 
promised to put up $50 and that he was 
not familiar with the above rule. He 
stated that as Mr. Woodall sold the 
shoe tacks before referred to without re- 
spect to the price of the association 
there was no advantage to him in join- 
ing. 

On September 17, 1894, the Ontario 
Tack Co. were informed that Mr. G. F. 
Stephens of Winnipeg had been placed on 
the association's preferred list for glaz- 
iers' points. 

In October, 1894, Hill & Forbes were 
struck off the jobbers' list and members 
were informed they could not sell them 
at jobbers' prices. In the same month 
the secretary wrote to Peck, Benny & 
Co. informing them that P. D. Dods & 
Co. had been struck off the lists of the 
association for glaziers' points because 
they refused to sign the declaration re- 
quired by the association. They after- 
wards agreed to join. 

The secretary wrote to the Montreal 
Rolling Mills asking their sanction to 
the Ontario Tack Co. selling American 
upholstering tacks and American car- 
riage tacks at GO per cent, off the price 
of Swedes. 

Wednesday's Evidence. 

The secretary wrote on November 6, 
1894, to the Pillow-Hersey Co. with re- 
ference to galvanized roofing nails, in- 
forming them that Messrs. Abbott & 
Co. had refused to sign the association 
agreement with regard to this article, 
and also that Peck, Benny & Co. did not 
want to bind themselves in this matter. 
The other members of the association 
thought they both ought to be bound as 
Abbott & Co. were underselling. Ihem. 

The Montreal Rolling Mills wrote the 
secretary with reference to the request 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



of the Ontario Tack Co. for permission 
to sell American carriage tacks at a re- 
bate of GU per cent, and American up- 
holstering tacks at a rebate of 62^ per 
cent. They said that they did not, wish 
to stand in the way of any member who 
had to fight American competition, but 
that before they gave their consent they 
would like a few more particulars. 

On December 27, 189 1, the secretary 
wrote to Wood, Vallance & Co. asking 
why they had sold carpet tacks below 
the price allowed by the association. 

A letter was written to the Ontario 
Tack Company on December 31, 1894, 
which said that at the time of the last 
meeting the price of brass wire rivets 
had been 19c. It was agreed to raise 
the price to 20c. The above company 
were asked what they thought the price 
should be in the Maritime Provinces. 
Under same date the secretary wrote to 
Peck, Benny & Co. to the effect that it 
had been found that they were selling 
the above brass rivets at the old price 
of 19c, whereas the price had been raised 
to 20c. They were asked to offer an ex- 
planation of their action. 

Infringing on Jobber's Rights. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co. wrote to 
the secretary on January 8, 1895, stat- 
ing that they were very much displeased 
with an addition the association had 
made to their list of articles governed 
by association rules, and that unless 
they withdrew the addition the writer 
would certainly withdraw from the as- 
sociation as they considered the associa- 
tion was infringing on the jobbers' 
rights. A letter to the same effect was 
written to the secretary by Howland & 
Son. 

With reference to the dispute over the 
price of brass rivets, Peck, Benny & Co. 
wrote that the total sales for the com- 
bined months of September and October 
were only $335. They had forgotten 
that the old price had been rescinded, 
but would in future bear in mind that 
the correct price was 20c. The secretary 
wrote to the Montreal Rolling Mill's 
asking them if they were satisfied with 
this explanation. 

On January 12, 1895, the secretary 
wrote to Caverhill, Learmont <fe Co. 
with reference to their letter of the 8th 
inst. and said that he did not consider 
that they had got to the root of the 
matter. He pointed out that if the man- 
ufacturer did not get sufficient business 
from the jobber he required legislation 
which would enable him to a certain ex- 
tent to do without the, jobber. In reply 
to this letter Caverhill , Learmont & 
Co. wrote that they had decided that 
unless the old state of affairs was re- 
turned to they must withdraw from the 
association and sell at any price they 
saw fit. 

The secretary wrote the Montreal 
Rolling Mills in reference to the above 
dispute, informing them of the attitude 
of the jobbers who wished to sell to the 
purchasers of $125. 

The large manufacturers' seem to have 
considered that the .purchasers of $125 
worth should buy from them direct. The 
Maritime manufacturers, however, com- 
plained that their firms in this particu- 
lar trade were much, smaller than in the 
other provinces. 

On January 17, 1895, the Massey-Har- 
ris Co. was quoted with the sanction of 
the members at the previous general 
meeting : 6-oz. tin harvester tacks at 
10;}-, and 12-oz. tin harvester tacks at 8. 

The secretary wrote in Julv, 1895, to 



bhe Montreal Rolling Mills with refer- 
ence to the dispute, with the jobbers and 

Caverhill, Learmont, & Co.'s letter, s.ij- 
ing that the matter was deserving of 
discussion by the members. "We think," 
said he, "that we were indiscreet m 
giving any reason to Caverhill, Lear- 
mont & Co." 

Mr. Curry read a letter to the Peter- 
boro Manufacturing Company in which 
Hie expression about all the manufactur- 
ers of tacks in Canada being members 
of the association was again made use 
Of. The letter staled that the great ob- 
ject of the association was to retain 
the tack trade in Canada in spite of 
American competition. A similar letter 
was written to Maxwell & Co., St. 
Mary's. 

Examination of Books. 

Mi. Curry asked Mr. Frame about the 
duties of the inspectors employed by the 
association. 

Mr. Curry : "Did they examine the 
manufacturers' books '.'" 

Mr. Frame : "Yes." 

Mr. Curry : "They also examined the 
books of the jobbers ?" 

Mr. Frame : "They might if the job- 
bers were agreeable." 

Mr. Curry : "They had the right to 
under the agreement ?" 

Mr. Frame : "I forget the terms of the 
agreement." 

Mr. Curry : "Do they not exercise the 
right to examine the jobbers' books in 
case of complaint ?" 

Mr. Frame : "It would be considered 
right to go to the jobbers' books if they 
would let us." 

Magistrate Deuisonj "Have they 
ever refused?" 

Mr. Frame: "There have been eases." 
Mr. Curry: ''Have you ever examin- 
ed them V ' 

Mr. Frame: "J don't remember any 
taek instance." 

In January. 1'895, Caverhill, Lear- 
mont & Co. wrote, saying that they 
should cease to be parties to'the agree- 
ment governing the sale of lacks. The 
secretary replied, acknowledging their 
letter, and saying that it should be laid 
before the association. A special meet- 
ing should be called and would have 
taken place before, had Mr. Whitton 
been well enough to travel. The mat- 
ter must stand over till then. 

The secretary wrote . in February, 
1895, to Peck, Benny & Co., asking 
whether they thought it was advisable 
to ask Messrs. Harris to join the ass i- 
.cdation lor tacks as well as for cut 
nails. Messrs. Harris were also written 
to and asked if they were willing to be- 
come members. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co. again wrote, 
savin-.- that they could not consent to 
any further delay in regard to the job- 
bers' dispute. 

The Holms Hardware Co., on February 
12, 1895, were written to with regard to 
a chaiL'e which had been laid against 
them, of filling an order for 2,000 pounds 
of cheese hi x tacks at a price 5 per eent. 
better than that allowed by the asso- 
ciation, and were asked to give their 
reasons for so doiilg. 

A Division of Profits. 
The following letter was written to 
i he Montreal Rolling Mills by the secre- 
tary, in February, ISO." : 

39 



' ' Willi respect to the order of t he 
Massev-llarris Co., we heard in an in 
direct way that Mr. Osborne staled that 

his company would not give an order 
for these goods, i<> be divided amongst 
the various members of the association. 

Our own impression is that if il were 
pointed ou1 to that gentleman that one 
member of I he assoeialioii was going to 

manufacture all the tacks, we should 
stand a good chance of obtaining the or- 
der. Of course, some arrangement 
would have to be 'made by which the 
members manufacturing the goods would 
pay something to the other members lor 
this privilege.' " 

(Signed) IL & T. JENKINS. 

Magistrate Denison: "He would have 
to have enough profit over to divide" 
amongst the others. Ibis is just the 
same as the plumbers' case. Whose poc- 
ket does it come from :' " 

Mr. Curry: '^Either from the pur- 
chaser or from the manufacturer who 
was chosen to do the work." 

Mr. Tilley: "They 'lid not want the 
order to go to the States, so Mr. Hardy 
tried to plan some arrangement by 
which all the members would be satis- 
lied. This never went through." 

Mr. Curry: "It is not necessary for 
it to have passed, so long as the in- 
dention was objectionable." 

Mr. Curry here made mention of the 
pooling arrangements of the associa- 
tion. 

Mr. Tilley: "There was no pool." 

Mr. Curry: "There was." 

Mr. Tilley : "There was no pool at 
this time." 

Mr. Curry: "We passed a letter some 
time ago referring to a pool." 

Mr. Tilley: "According to the min- 
utes the pool was not established until 
1S99." 

With reference to the Massey-Harris 
Co., the magistrate held that one man 
should do all the work and get all the 
profit. 

A Saving in Production. 

Mr. Tilley: "Mr. Whitton says that 
if one man had the whole order he would 
be able to execute it at a lower cost 
than if it were divided up. The asso- 
ciation should not be convicted because 
Mr. Hardy had proposed (but not car- 
ried out) what was considered to be an 
objectionable line of action." 

Magistrate Denison: "In a conspir- 
acy case of that kind, the intention of 
one member was sufficient to incriminate 
all." 

Mr. Curry said that it was not bad 
law to say that all the members were 
responsible for a proposition of this 
kind, as they were all banded together. 

On February IS, IS!).",, the Montreal 
Rolling Mills were informed by letter 
that the association's inspectors were 
going to make an examination of Peck, 
Benny & t'o's hooks. 

Competition Threatened. 

On the same date he wrote to Messrs. 
Pender & Co.. eharsing him with having 
sold iron rivets ;:l less than association 
price. Although there was no actual 
agreement, yet Mr. Pender had verbally 
arranged to maintain association price 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



excepi in the case of Packard & 
It' tlic verbal agreement " :,s not adhered 
lid Hie writer, the members will 
have |o reduce the price on this line 

The Magistrate: "Quite siguificanl 
in its way ' Ii shows that they were not 
Btruggliug for lower prices ' 

Canadians Forcsd to Combine. 

The sales of tacks For the year 
amount to $126,999.29, the total for all 
the manufacturers combined, and the 
magistrate considered these figures show 
oil ;\ small volume of business. 

Mr. Tilley: '"It' they did not com 
bine they would have to close down! Any 
United states factory could spoil 
the Canadian tack trade any day." 

Pender & Go. wrote denying the charge 
of having sold rivets at $6.15, f.o.b. To- 
ronto. 

On March 1, "ISO."), the secretary wrote 
to the. members, informing them thai 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co! were not en- 
titled to rebate, as they bad retired from 
the association. 

In March, 1895, Peck, Benny & Co. 
wrote R. & T. Jenkins with reference to 
some manufacturer who was alleged to 
lling cut tacks at less than asso- 
ciation prices. They informed Messrs. 
Jenkins i bat they did not know who the 
offending party was. but that it had oc- 
curred to them that W. T. WbodaJl 
mighl be tbe manufacturer in question, 
as he bad recently added to bis fac- 
tory. "If he is the Jonah," ran tbe 
letter, "we shall have to bring prices 
down below a living profit in order to 
bring him into the association. 

Tbe Montreal Rolling Mills wrote on 
- in e subject, asking tbe secretary 
to inform them as soon as possible who 
i be offender was. 

ArnericVn. Competition. 

With reference to the threat of Arm- 
strong & Co.. Guelph, that unless they 
were allowed rebate they would place 
their order in U. S. A.. Mr. Tilley said 
that there were some firms who insisted 
on buying their goods at 5 per cent lie- 
low the price at which anyone else could 
purchase, and that in order to bring one 
particular manufacturer to their terms. 
they would give their order to a compet- 
ing manufacturer at a higher price than 
the first manufacturer had quoted, to 
penalize him until he agreed to their 
terms. 

In January. 1897, the Portland Roll- 
ing Mills wrote, asking permission to 
lower in order to meet American coin- 
petition. The secretary, thereupon. 
wrote to the Montreal Rolling Mills, in- 
forming them that the Portland Rolling 
Mills had asked permission to lower 
their prices, as a S,t. John firm, and also 
a Halifax firm, had been buying in the 
Stale-, and asking their opinion. The 
secretary a.lso wrote, informing the Port- 
land Rolling Mills that an informing 
meeting had been called, and that be 
could not give them the free hand they 
asked for. 

In February. 1897, the secretary wrote 

all the members, informing them that 

Portland Rolling Mills had sent in their 

rnation, because they did not get 



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Enameloid is a specialty that every dealer 
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the required permission above referred 
to. Permission was accordingly grant- 
ed them. 

The two linns who had been buying in 
the States were the Amherst Shoe Co. 
and J. S. Sime & Co. 

In April, 1898, the secretary wrote 
the .Montreal Rolling .Mills Co. aneut the 
alleged sale on the part of the Pillow 
llersey Co. to Lewis Pins. & Co., of 
goods below the association price. He 
informed them that he did not think the 
association had the right to question 
Lewis Bros. & Co. as to the price at 
which they sold to the Laurentide Paper 
Co., but that thev ought not to be told 
that they are not bound to disclose the 
price. 

On April 2.~>, 1898, the secretary wrote 
to Pender & Co., and all the other tnem- 
.bers, informing them that thev must 
subn it their shoefinders J list to the see- 
retary, in order that be may compile 
from them an official list and remove 
from tbe list any that he thought it de- 
sirable to remove. Only those whose 
names were on the official list were lo 
be entitled lo the 12 1-2 per cent, dis- 
count. 



Correspondence as Evidence. 

This concluded tbe examination of 
association letter book No. 1, and Mr. 
Curry went on to the letter book in 
use in 1902, without reading the in- 
termediate letters, putting them in, how- 
ever, as evidence. 

On January 27, 1902, the secretary 
wrote to the Canada Hardware Co., of 
Montreal, re Quebec canals. "We have 
Messrs. Lewis Bros. & Go's explanation, 
which was confidential, so that we can- 
not detail it to you. We are satisfied 
with the explanation." 

He wrote also to the Pillow, Hersey 
Co. on Jan. 3, 1902, with reference 
to the 5 per cent, loyalty discount, ex- 
plaining that the gross amount of the 
invoice was equivalent to 4.37 per cenr. 
off the uross amount of tbe invoice. 

Mr. Curry at this point remarked that 
it must, have been necessary for them 
to work together or they would not, 
have gone to so much trouble, have wiit- 
ten so many letters, or gone to so tim 'h 
expense in order to keep the associati >.i 
in line. 

This concluded, Hie evidence given up 
to Thursday noon. 



40 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDRY AND METAL 
INDUSTRIES 



YEAR'S ACTIVITY IN N.S. 

During; the year 1905 the Nova Scotia 
SteeJ & Coal Co. produeed 560,000 tons 
of coal, 1.20,000 ions eoke, 58j000 ions 
pig iron, 22,000 tons steel, the steel fur- 
naces only producing since -luly k.s'. 
These are the largest figures in the 
history of the emopany: The com- 
pany predicts an output oi' 750,000 Ions 
of coal for 1906. 

Last year I he Dominion Iron & Steel 
Co's total production of pig' iron was 
162,000 tons, open hearth steel furnaces 
173,500 tons, and rolling mills 47,000 
tons. Of eighty-pound steel rails, -14,- 
000 have been already turned out. The 
production of eoke amounted to 242,150 
tons. At the beginning of 1905 six open 
hearth furnaces were in operation. This 
number was gradually increased until 
the whole ten were in use in Septem- 
ber and remaining months of the year. 



NOVA SCOTIA COAL PRODUCTION. 

The following is an approximate es- 
timate of the shipments of the various 
coal mining companies in Nova Scotia 
during 1905: 

Dominion Coal Co. -2,91 2,000 tons; 
132,000 increase. 

N. S. Steel & Coal Co., Sydney Mines 
-533,000 tons; 94,000 increase. 

Cowrie & Blockhouse— 35,000 Ions; 
400 increase. 

Inverness Railway & Coal Co.— 136.- 
000 tons; 29,000 increase. 

Port Hood Coal Co.-12,000 tons; 50,- 
000 decrease. 

Cumberland Railway & Coal Co.— 
416,000 tons; 17,000 decrease. 

International Coal Co. -217,000 tons; 
25,000 decrease. 

Marsh C. N. S. S. & S. Co. -32,000 
tons. 25,000 decrease. 

Acadia Coal Co. -258.000 tons; 3,000 
increase. 

Sundry Cape Breton collieries — 150,- 
000 tons; 3,000 increase. 

Sundry Cumberland collieries — 150,- 
000 tons; 17,000 increase. 

Total— 4,716,000 tons, or an increase 
in round figures of close on 100,000 
tons. 

METAL NOTES. 

In 1905 the Granby smelter treated 
650,000 tons of ore, and in 1906, with its 
two new large furnaces and with its 
six old furnaces enlarged, it should 
treat 85,000 to 90,000 tons of ore per 
month, or at least 1,000,000 tons for the 
year. 

What is Supposed to be an excellent 
seam of coal has been discovered at 
Little Bras d'Or, N.S. 

The Britannia smelter at Crofton, B.C., 
has been blown in after a long shut down 
during which many additions have been 
made. 



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41 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



SELLING HARDWARE BUSINESS 

One of Montreal's oldest retail hard- 
ware stands is now being disposed oi 
John Milieu .v Sons, whose head office 
I St. Catherine street and who 
also a branch in Toronto, have de- 
cided to give up their retail hardware 
department, and having sold their 
plumbing supplies in a lump, they are 
now running om the remainder ol their 
quickly as possible. 

Thirty-eight years ago John Milieu 
opened a small hardware store on St. 
■ line street, Montreal. His busi- 
ness, however-, soon grew to such pro- 
portions thai il could not be accommo- 
dated in these limited quarters. Con- 
sequently after nine years in this place 
he purchased the building on the corner 
of Plessis street at present occupied by 
the firm. For the last twenty-nine 
years Mr. Milieu, associated during part 
of that time with his sons, has been en- 
... a growing business, but much of 
nergies have been directed to the 
agenC) and specially branch, which has 
become so important as to completely 
overshadow the retail hardware depart- 
ment. 

Under these circumstances, then, it 
has been decided to devote the firm's 
ies exclusively to this trade, and 
Mr. Milieu has jusl sold for a good fig- 
ure the building on St. Catherine street. 
The premises formerly occupied by the 
Laurie Engine Works, at 321 St. James 
street, extending right back to Craig, 
have been secured and will be lilted up 
in the most modern style. Contracts 
have already been let for this work. The 
ollice fittings will be of oak, while the 
warehouse is lo lie trimmed with pine. 
This location in the heart of the down- 
town section, in what might be termed 
the "machinery quarter," will be much 
better fitted to the firm's requirements. 
Canadian distributors for the 
Shelby steel tubing, and jobbers of such 
specialties as gas engine fittings, launch 
fittings, automobile supplies, and bicycle 
builders' sundries, John Millen & Sims 
will hereafter be in a much better posi- 
tion to expand their trade. And in the 
meantime there is a good opportunity 
for someone to step in and secure their 
whole stock of hardware, taking advan- 
tage of the firm's long-established con- 
nection. 



INTERESTING LEGAL DECISION. 

A case of much importance to the 
mercantile community was decided by 
Judge Chisholm at Gall on January 10. 
Seely & Smith, Montreal, shoes, sued 
on an accepted draft of Mark Mundy, ex- 
mayor, retail shoe dealer. The defence 
was that the draft was accepted before 
the goods were examined at the request 
of the consignors, who promised to make 
right any errors. The merchant kept on- 
ly part of the goods, sending back the 
balance as not up to sample, and refus- 
ing to pay therefor. 

The judge held the acceptance of the 
draft mighl, purely on legal grounds, 
compel defendant io pay for all Ihe 
goods, but the court was one of equity, 
and therefore the pledge of the vplaintiffs 
to correct errors was sufficient to debar 
them from recovering the balance. $6.6. 
The judge also held that under law the 
defendants should not have returned the 
goods, but simply refused to a< 

and notifv the plaintiffs to that 
effect. They hold goods at their own 
risk. 



Either Way You Look At It 

From the standpoint of either safety or accuracy, no better weapon for defence 

or attack can be had 

than the Iver Johnson 



Revolver. No safety mechanism could be 

more simple and perfect — a device that means safety, 

without any "ifs" or "buts" about it. The 

Iver Johnson 

REVOLVERS 



need not bo handled carefully; 
with chambers fully loaded, 
drop it on the floor, hammer 
the hammer— it can't possibly 
go off unless you deliberately 
pull the trigger. 

Iver Johnson Revolvers are for 

sale at all dealers. 
Hammer, $6.50 Hammerless, S7.80 

Write for cmr bright little 
booklet, "Shots" and complete 
catalogue, free. 

Jver Johason's Arms and Cycle WorKs^ 

F1TCHBURC. MASS. 



WIRE 



It's time to think about Wire for the 
Spring fencing trade. 

We can supply all sizes of 

Oiled and Annealed Wire 

in both large and small diameter coils. 

Our process of oiling insures a dry sur- 
face, which permits of handling without 
loss of its protective properties. 

SPECIFY /^^V BRAND 

The Montreal Rolling Mills Co, 



We also manufacture 



Bright Wire 
Hay Baling Wire 



Annealed Wire 
Bale Ties, etc. 



42 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & GO. 



Only 
Wholesale 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 
38-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO 



LIMITED 



Wholesale 
Only 



ORSE BLANKETS 



RETURNED 

JAN 15 190 




HETURr 

MN 15 1906 




No. 

I. 

3. 

IX. 

140. 

540. 

AI40. 



No. 
22. 
75. 
75. 
450. 
20. 
77. 



Size 
60x70 in. 
62x70 " 
62 x 70 " 
62 x 70 " 
70 X 70 " 
70 x 70 " 



Jute Horse Blankets 

Striped Jute, Unlined 



% Black Lined 

%Wool " 

Extra Heavy, % Wool. 



Size 

60 x 70 in 
64 X70 " 

61 X70 " 
64 X 70 " 
70 X 70 " 
70 X 70 " 



Kersey Horse Blankets 



Plain Kersey. Ked .. 
" Fawn. 

Blue.. 
Heavy Striped ... 

Heavy, Checked .. . . 



''Stayon" Horse Blanket 

Size 
1 Quebec," 65 x 70 in. Windsor Kersey, Brown 

No. 
1264. 70x72" " Striped 



Burlington "Stayon," Shaped 



Alpine,' 
Fulton,' 



Size 
78 x 72 in. 
78 X 72 " 



Brown Kersey 
Striped "... 



RETURNED 

JAN 15 1906 




HORSE OL-IF»F3|IMQ MACHIN 



RETURNED 
JAT '06 



"20th Century" Clipper 

Has 12-inch positive geai drive; steel flexible shaft 4% 
feet long. Complete with one set Stewart one-nut tension 
knives. Weighs 15 lbs. 

This is a wonderful little machine. It is simple, compact 
and can easily l>e carried from place to place. It is arranged 
to be suspended from the ceiling anywhere by rope, which 
is included in the box. This permits all parts of the horse 
reached with ease. It turns easy, cuts fast and requires no 
experience to operate. Just the thing for a small btable. 




1902 Chicago" Clipper 



Has positive power ; rigid base: fine, strong crank handle ; 6%-foot flexible 
steel shaft, all gears are cut from solid metal, and wearing parts all tool steel, 
hardened. Can be turned with either right or left hand. Complete with one 
set of Stewart one-nut tension knives in case. Weight, boxed, 56 lbs. 

This machine-is surprisingly strong and durable. The world's record for 
fast clipping was made with it at the St. Louis Exposition -time 13% minutes. 
A boy can turn it all day without tiring. It satisfies completely the needs of 
the large stable. 







New Stewart" Inclosed Gear Clipper, Latest Model 



Has new style rigid base ; tubular upright. All gears are cut from solid 
metal and areenclosed in a dust-proof metal box. They run constantly in a bath 
of oil which reduces- friction to a minimum. All wearing parts are hardened 
tool steel. New tvpe, light, easy running flexible shaft ay z feet long. Complete 
with one set of Stewart one-nut tension knives. Weight, each, boxed, 36 lbs. 

This new machine meets the demand for a very high grade clipper at a 
price anv horse owner can afford. Every moving part if inclosed and safe from 
dust and dirt of all kinds. It runs easy and cuts with the greatest speed. Is 
very compact ; can be carried around conveniently. By all odds a superior 
machine in construction, materials and action. 



FOR HAND HORSE CLIPPER, SINGER GIRTH, ETC., SEE OUR CATALOGUE 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



Our Prices Are Right 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory : Dufferin Street, Toronto. 

43 



We Ship Promptly. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 




PATENT PAINT STRAINER. 

A capital idea in the way of a louse 
bottomed painl strainei lias been put <>n 
the English market bj Messrs. Skegg & 
Co . Oldtield Road, .Manchester. A painl 
strainer with removable bottom is no1 a 
new idea. There have been several de- 
vices of this kind on the market, but 
many have been cumbersome, expensive. 
and very dirty in use. Skegg's invention 
is very clean, as the sieve can be put in 
position simply by pressure, and it locks 
itself securely. The illustrations clearly 
show the construction of the strainer. 
The loose sieve is dropped into the bot- 
tom of the funnel and pressed into posi- 
tion by working down the metal edge of 
the sjeve When it is required to put in 




what i> meant by the term " mineral 
paints'" (that is, whether while paint 
alone is included), they will probably 
be luard from on i he question. 

It is thought that Mr. Wilmotl refers 
to paints which are mined and manu- 
factured in Canada. In the matter ol 
white lead, which is mined in British 
Columbia and corroded in Montreal, it 
is imperative, in accordance with laws 
now existing, that all white leads brand- 
ed ••pure" or "genuine," should be 
free from adulteration of any kind, and. 
if any person were to suspect that pack- 
ages of ground white lead, branded 
"pure" contains any. extraneous mat- 
ter, he should have il analysed. In case 
il is found to he reduced in anv way by 
an adulterant, the grinder could be sev- 
erely punished. 

Of course there are paints which eon- 
tain ether ingredients besides white 
lead, and these mixtures are preferred 
by some, who contend that they work 
equally as well, for their purpose; he- 
sides being obtained at a lower price 



than pure while lead. These packages, 
however, are not branded "pure" 01' 
"genuine," by any honest maker. 

Coming to Hie other mineral paints, 
such as oxides, graphites and fireproof. 
painl s, there is no doubt a wide range 
of Ibis class of paint, which is variously 
treated to meet the demand for cheap 
paints. Iiui anyone who ' lakes the 
trouble to ask Tor ''pure" oxides and 
"pure" granhite, bearing the brand and 
name of well-known makers, can gel 
exactly what he asks lor. 

OIL DEVELOPMENT IN ALBERTA. 

The Western Oil & Coal Co. have a 
project in contemplation to build a pipe 
line fro Macleorl, Alberta, and make 
that, town its distributing point. The 
company are now operating three wells 
on its property, which consists of 16,- 
000 acres of coal and oil areas near the 
international boundary, about 40 miles 
south of Macleod. Storage tanks and a 
refinery will be erected at Macleod, and 
the pipe line will cost $100,000. 



PLIN OrLOOSC STRAINER A- 

A Patent Paint Strainer. 

a new sieve, the old one can be levered 
up by insert inn a puttv knife under its 
edge, when it springs out quite easily. 
As the sieve is quite flat in the bottom 
no dirt or skins of painl are encouraged 
to accumulate, so that it is bound to be 
cleaner than a rounded sieve. The bowl 
of the strainer will las! for years, be- 
cause there is no wear upon it, and a 
new sieve can be put in at any time at 
^mall expense. The sieves are made 
in two grades of mesh and fit each bowl 
perfectly. 

ARE PAINTS ADULTERATED? 

A despatch from Ottawa, dated Jan- 
uary .">, reads as follows: "Mr. Wilmot. 
nl' the Geographical Survey stall', who 
has been examining samples of mineral 
paints on the Canadian market, finds 
thai, as a rule, they arc adulterated he- 
yond measure, in a ureal many case-, in 
the extent of lill per cent. In a pamph- 
let Mi. Wilreutt is now preparing, he 
will call attention to the large dep 
in Canada, of the natural pfvKic'iK 
lit; t would make the very finest and most 
enduring painl in the world." 

Canadian manufacturers are await- 
ing, with interest, the appearance of 
this pamphlet, and. when they learn Jusl 



^*^*.-^-%^m^*.-%.-*^*^*.-R 



TORONTO, Ontario, Canada 



Limited 



Out for Spring Business I 

Our travellers will solicit your 
orders some time before opening 
of Spring Trade. Wait for their 

proposition. Hollywood, Elasti- 
lite, Orolite, Mangolite, Dreni- 
tine, M. L Varnish Stain and 

Coach Enamel are old standards 
worthy of consideration. 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Company 1 



.-•*'»• ••? 



44 



January 13, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Meta. 



Do You Keep It? 



Do You Keep It? 



Exceedingly durable, possessing great resisting qualities to acids, alkalies, sulphur or chemical fumes, weather 



extremes, etc. 



GRAPHITE PAINT 



is just the paint you should stock up. 

Graphite Paint is admirably suited for painting Iron and Wooden Bridges, Cars, Elevators, Steamboats, etc.; in 
fact, any metal or wooden surface where the exposure is great. 

There is a heavy demand for this class of goods. You do well to write for our catalogue now so that you will 
have full information. 



THE STANDARD PAINT &VARNISH WORKS CO., Limited, Windsor, ont. 



DRAFT EXCLUDER 



The patents, or rights to manufacture 
a drafc excluder are for sale for Canada 
and the United States. The Draft Ex- 
cluder is an English invention and is re- 
garded as the most effective appliance 
that has yet been produced It can be 
fastened on any door in a few minutes. 
It is so constructed that when the door 
closes, wind, water and even air are pre- 
vented from passing between the foot ot 
the door and the floor. It is strong and 
durable, but at the same time light 
and neat and does not in any way dis- 
figure the door to which it may be 
attached. 

The chief feature of its superiority over 
others is that when the door is closed the 
Excluder presses very firmly against 
the floor, yet the moment the door is 
opened even the smallest degree the pres- 
sure is released, so that the door may 
swing backwards and forwards as freely 
as if there were no appliance upon it. 

It goes on upon the inside of the door. 

COST OF PRODUCTION 

The Excluder is constructed of mild 
sheet metal and rubber, and it costs in 
England about three shillings and three 
pence to produce each Excluder. The 
rubber may be replaced by wood and in 
that case the cost of production would 
be reduced to about two shillings and 
six pence. These calculations are based 
on cost of steel and rubber in England. 

Address inquiries to 
SOLICITOR, care of Hardware and Metal 
Toronto Office. (tl) 



Manufacturers' 



nr* Hardware and 

10 Metal has in- 

quiries from lime 
to time from 
m auufacturers 
Aflrgflfc anc ' °therswant- 

AgWlllo ; n g representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

■• HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 



are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 



To be obtained from the 
principal Hardware 
Dealers and Glass 



Merchants. 



Agent, tor Canada: A Ramsay & Son Company, Montreal 




Raw Unseed 
Boiled Linseed 
Pale Boiled Linseed 
Pale Refined Linseed 



"DOMINION' 
BRAND 

OILS GUARANTEED GENUINE. 



Canadian Agents— 
J. A. BERNARD, 

21 St. Peter street., Quebec 
HOMER TAYLOR, 
Temple Bldg., Montreal 



FRED'K FENNER & CO., LTD. 

PENINSULAR HOUSE, MONUMENT ST., E.C. 

LONDON, ENGLAND. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 




Ahead of all others in quality and workmanship. If sparks of fine quality, set 
by experts, are what you require, buy Diamonds of A. Shaw & Son's make. 
Canadian Agent 

©odf-rey s. pelton 

388 ST. PAUL ST., MONTREAL 



Will Hold Dp a Shell! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Bet- 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



45 




PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

IftM*".."! ^^-^f Largest Variety, 
JStty^Z^^y/f Toilet, Hand, Electric Pows 

*^0</ ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

BIND FOR CATALOGUE TO 
A»rleaa Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, HJH..C8* 
Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited special NewjYork 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 



"Anchor 

AND 

English 

Liquid 

Paints" 



Paint economy, like economy in 
other lines, depends upon getting 
good value for your money. 

Anchor and 
English Liquid 
Paints 

we know to be the best value 
obtainable in paint. 
They are perfect paints. There 
is nothing used in their manu- 
facture but the purest pigments, 
linseed oil, turpentine, dryers, 
and the world's best white lead — 
BRANDRAM'S B. B. GENU- 
INE 





Manufactured by 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited 

HALIFAX and ST. JOHN 

HENDERSON & POTTS GO., 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



QUEBEC. 

Office oi llw:i>» u;i and Metal, 

232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 12, 1906. 

Notwithstanding the Winter season, 
which is now upon us, the various manu- 
facturers report that their mills are 
busily engaged, both in orders for im- 
mediate shipment, and preparing stock 
lor early Spring, 

One of the features of t lie week has 
been a good demand for white lead, and 
so scarce has this become, that prices 
have advanced about 50 cents per hund- 
red pounds. In fact, as one grinder re- 
marks, it is almost as easy to get gold 
as lead, to-day. 

Red lead is also beginning to feel 
strength, and quotations on this article 
are also advanced. 

Canadian makers of Paris green state 
that inquiries, so far, have been 
phenomenal. So much so, that the first 
product has all been sold within a week 
or ten days. Owing to the lively demand 
which still exists, they are now manu- 
facturing a second lot, which, neces- 
sarily, will he at increased figures, as 
chemicals are much higher and very 
scarce. We understand that American 
makers of Paris green have cancelled all 
quotations, owing to the scarcity of ar- 
senic. 

Linseed Oil— The tone in linseed is 
firmer than for some time past. It is 
extremely difficult to obtain large quanti- 
ties, and the position is such that job- 
bers, while they will supply regular cus- 
tomers with single barrels at a price one 
cent lower than we quote, have raised 
their figures, under ordinary circum- 
stances, to 52c. and 55c. A peculiar 
feature of the trade is . that the larger 
the quantity required, the larger the 
pi ice asked. We ouote as follows: Raw. 
(iic to four barrels, 52c; five to nine 
barrels, 51c; boiled, one to four barrels, 
55c: five to nine barrels, 54c, f.o.b. 
Montreal, net 30 days. 

Turpentine— The prevailing impression 
among the trade is that turpentine will 
remain steady for some time now. We 
quote: Single barrel, 93c per gallon. 
Two barrels or over, 92c For smaller 
quantities than barrel, 5c extra per 
gallon is charged. Standard gallon is 
8.40 lbs. f.o.b. point of shipment, net 
30 days. 

Ground White Lead— The demand has 
been so great as to create a decided 
scarcity, which has driven prices up- 
ward again. We now- give the follow- 
ing prices: P>est brand Government 
standards," $6.00 to $6.05;, No. 1, $5.65 to 
$5.80; No. 2. $5.30 to $5.55; No. 3, $5.05 
to $5.30: all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— We quote: Parrels, 
$5.40; 100 lb. packages, $5.65; 6 to 10 
lb. tins, $6.65. 

46 



Dry White Zinc— Our prices are as 
follows: Red seal, 7c to 8c; French 
V. M., (>r. to 7c; Lehigh, 5c to 6c 

White Zinc (ground in oil) — We quote 
as follows: Pure, Sc. to 9c; No. 1, 6 
l-2c. to 7 l-2c; No. 2, 5 l-4c to 6 l-4c 
Putty— Our quotations are: Pure lin- 
seed oil, $1.75 to $1.85; bulk in barre's, 
$1.50; in 25-lb. irons, $1.80; in tins, 
$1.90: bladdered putty in barrels, $1.75. 
Orange Mineral— We give the follow- 
ing prices: Casks, 7 l-4c ; 100-lb. kegs, 
7 l-2c. ; smaller quantities, 8 l-2c 

Red Lead— Ibices have again been ad- 
vanced. There is a scarcity in the mar- 
ket which will keep prices firm for 
some time. We are now quoting as 
follows: Genuine red lead in casks, $5.00 
to $5.25; in 100-lb. kegs, $5.25; in less 
quantities at the rate of $6.00 per 100 
lbs. : No. 1 red lead, casks, $4.75; kegs, 
$5.00, and smaller quantities, $5.75. 

Gum Shellac — We still quote: Fine 
orange, 55e. per lb.; med. orange, 50c 
per lb.; bleached shellac (white), 60c. 
per lb. 

Paris Green (for 1906)— We quote 
as follows: Barrels, 600 lbs., 15 l-4c 
for Canadian Government standard, 
to 15 3-4c for Berger's English; 
kegs, 250 lbs., 15 l-2c to 16c ; drums, 25 
lbs., 16 l-2c to 17c; drums, 50 and 100 
lbs., 16c to 16 l-2c; 1 lb. packets, 17c 
to 17 l-2c; 1 lb. tins, 18c to 18 l-2c; 
1-2 lb. packages, 19c to 20 l-2c per 
pound. Terms, 2 per cent, off on Berg- 
er's English. 

Shellac Varnish— We quote as follows: 
$2.50 to $2.60; pure orange, $2.40 to 
$2.50; No. 1 orange, $2.35 to $2.45. 

Mixed Paints— We quote from $1.20 to 
$1.40 per gallon. 

Castor Oil— Fluctuations have been 
numerous of late, though the tendency 
is generally upward. We are at pres- 
ent quoting: First, in cases 8 l-2c, in 
barrels Sc ; seconds, in cases Sc, in bar- 
rels 7 l-2c 

Refined Petroleum— We still quote: 
American water white, 16 l-2c and 17 
l-2c ; Canadian prime white, 14 l-2c 
and 15 l-2c; IS l-2c and 19 l-2c ex 
warehouse. 

Window Glass— Large bookings for 
Spring delivery have been made during 
the week. Everything is as firm as be- 
fore, and indications are that fancy 
prices will be demanded next Summer. 
We quote: First break, 50 feet, 
$2.10; second break, $2.20; first break. 
100 feet, $4.25; third break, 100 feet, 
$4.75; fourth break. 100 feet, $5; fifth 
break, 100 feet, $5.25; sixth break, 100 
feet. $5.75; seventh break, 100 feet. 
$6.25; eighth break, 100 feet, $6.50. Dia- 
mond star, first break, 50 feet, $2.30: 
second break. 50 feet, $2.50; first break. 
100 feet, $4.40: second do., $4.80: third 
do., $5.75; fourth do., $6.50; fifth do.. 



January 13, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



$7.50; sixth do., $8, and seventh do., $9. 
Double thick, first break, 50 feet, $3.45; 
second break, $3.75 ; first break, 100 feet, 
$6.75; second do., $7.25; third do.; $8.75; 
fourth do., $10; fifth do., $11.50; sixth 
do., $12.50: seventh do., $14; eighth do., 
$16.50; ninth do., $18; tenth do., $20; 
eleventh do., $24.00, and twelfth do.. 
$28.50. 

ONTARIO. 

( iffire of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan. 12, 1906. 

Linseed oil has gone ballooning this 
week, owing In reports from India that 
seed will be scarce and very high in 
price. Sales for present consumption 
are very small at present, but much 
booking for Spring delivery is being 
done because of the general impression 
thai prices during the coming season 
will be higher than last year. Until 
the opening of navigation prices will lie 
on the advance, it is said, but after that 
all is problematical. At any rate 
present quotations are soaring high and 
last week's advance of 4c. has been du- 
plicated this week with the prospect of 
further advances. 

White and red lead and putty also 
show advances this week, lead being very 
firm at the advanced price. Turpentine 
remains steady at last week's figures. 

White Lead— Ex Toronto, pure white, 
$6.05; No. 1, $5.67 1-2: No. 2, $5.30: 
No. 3, $5.05; No. 4, $4.80 in packages of 
25 lbs. and upwards; l-2e. per lb. extra 
will be charged for 12 1-2 lb. packages; 
genuine dry white lead, in casks, $5.40. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lbs., $5.00, ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., 
$5.50; No. 1, in casks of 500 lbs., $4.75; 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $5.25. 

Dry White Zinc — In casks, 7c, in 100 
lbs., 7 l-2c. ; No. 1, in casks 6c. in 100 
lbs. 6 l-2c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— In 25- 
lb. irons, 8c, in 12 1-2 lbs, 8 l-2c 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gal'oii lots, 57 to 
90c. per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1.00 per 100 lbs. 

Whiting— 60c to 65c per 100 lbs.; 
Gilders' Avhiting, 75c. 

Paris Green (for 1906) -We quote 
as follows: Barrels, 600 lbs., 15 l-4c 
for Canadian Government standard, 
to 15 3-4ci. for Berger's English; 
kegs, 250 lbs., 15 12c to 16c ; drums, 25 
lbs., 1'6 l-2c. to 17c; drums, 50 and 100 
lbs., 16c to 16 l-2c; 1 lb. packets, 17c 
to 17 l-2c; 1 lb. tins, 18c to 18 l-2c. ; 
1-2 lb. packages, 19c to 20 l-2c per 
pound. Terms, 2 per cent, off on Berg- 
er's English. 

Shellac Varnish — Pure orange in 
barre's, $2.80; white, $2.90 per barrel; 
No. 1 (orange), $2.25. 

Linseed Oil— Our quotations are: Raw, 
1 to 4 barrels, 60c; boiled, 62c; 5 to 9 
barrels, raw, 59c.; boiled, 61c. Toronto. 
Han _ i It <>ii, London and Guelph, net 30 
days. Advance of 2c. for delivery to 
outside points. 

Turpentine— Single barrel lots, 97c 
f.o.b., point of shipment, net 




RAH«i]S«n TaOy 



"SPRAY! BROTHERS, SPRAY!" 

Tune"ROW! BROTHERS, ROW!" 
(Apologies to Moore) 

"Quickly, when comes the growing "Spray ! brothers, Spray ! the bugs 

time, grow fast, 

"The potato plants flourish and "And the fungi strikes like a bane- 

potato bugs climb. ful blast, 

"Soon as the blossoms have fallen "Spray! brothers, Spray! the har- 

down, vest comes on 

"The codling moth gets moving "When sound fruit and potatoes 

aroun'. reward work well done." 



c 





PARIS 
GREEN 



Kills 



T CO.'S 

POTATO 
BUGS 



-MADE ONLY BY THE- 



CANADA PAINT COMPANY 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



January 13, 1906 



thirty days. For less quantities 
than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra will be 
added, and for 5-gallon packages, 50c., 
and 10-gallon packages SOc. will be 
charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bar- 
rels, 5 to 25e. per lb. ; cabinet glue, in 
barrels, 11 1-2 to 12cj emery glue, in 
bane's, 15c.; bookbinders' ground, 11 
l-'-'c: fines! American white, 19c; No. 1 
American white, 15c. per lb. 

Putty— Ordinary, bladders in barrels, 

i; pure linseed oil. $2.00 to .-?2.10; 

bulk in Sin) lb. .asks. $1.50: pure, 

$1.95 to $2.00: 100-lb. kegs, 25c. extra. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2.00 
per barrel. 

Liquid Paints -Pure, $1.20 to $1.35 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 70c. to SOc. 

Bridge Paints— 75c. to $1.00. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 8 1-2 to 
9c. per lb., and 10c. for single tins. 

Refined Petroleum— Trade continues 
normal. We quote : Canadian prime 
white, 14c. ; water white, 16c. ; American 
water white, 16c. to 18c. ex warehouse. 

Crude Petroleum— Prices continue un- 
changed. We quote: Canadian, $1.36; 
Pennsylvania, $1.61 ; Ohio, 94c. 



SUBSTITUTE FOR WHIlE LEAD. 

The campaign against white lead in 
France has assumed strong propor- 
tions. A meeting at Paris lately com- 
posed of nearly 2,000 scientists, con- 
tractors, masters and workmen, put 
into definite form the dangers of lead 



poisoning among painters, The ar- 
raignment having been completed and 
driven home by statistics and scientific 
testimony from which there could be no 
reasonable appeal, the meeting took up 
the question of a practical remedy. 
This was declared to be simply the 
abolition by law of the manufacture 
and use of white lead as a painting 
material and its replacement by zinc 
white, a substitute which is superior 
in whiteness, equally durable, harmless 
to human health, and only 1 per cent. 
more expensive to produce. 

To accomplish this reform there is 
now before the French Senate an Act 
submitted to the Chamber of Depu- 
ties by Mr. •!• L. Breton, and adopted 
with substantial unanimity. This nro- 
position recognizes the vested rights of 
white lead manufacturers and will al- 
low 7 them four years from the date of 
enactment of the proposed law in which 
to close up their business or convert 
their factories to the uroduction of col- 
ors having a zinc base. After that 
white lead may no longer be manufac- 
tured in France. 



THOSE WHO FAIL. 

It is ofttimes true that those who 
seem to fail are indeed more successful 
than those with whom all things appear 
to go well. It is not always the people 
whose names are on everybody's lips 
and who get frequent mention in the 
newspapers who are doing the most 
good; ofttimes those of whom little is 
heard, who work away in quiet and ob- 
scurity, are doing more to bless the 
world than those who seem so conspicu- 



ous. A writer tells of passing through 
a meadow and finding the air full of 
fragrance. Yet he saw no flowers and 
wondered whence the fragrance came. 
In his quest he found that beneath the 
tall, showy grass multitudes of little 
lowly flowers were growing, hidden 
away out of sight, yet pouring forth 
sweet odors. It is often the lowly lives 
that do the most to sweeten the world. 
-Ex. 



PRICE DEMORALIZERS. 

This is a free country and every man 
who goes into business has a perfect 
right to demoralize prices if he wants 
to. But in the great majority of in- 
stances the price demoralizer is in the 
crawfish class before the other fellows 
are through with him. We can learn 
by the experience of others. It is un- 
doubtedly due to this fact that the per- 
centage of new merchants who think 
they can slash their way into trade is 
growing remarkably less. That is one 
tendency toward saner methods in mer- 
chandising. The public is quite wise. 
It accepts all of the goods the new 
merchant will offer below cost and buys 
the best of the order where it is sure 
reliable merchandise is being sold at 
sensible prices. A review of the price 
slashing campaigns yields very little en- 
couragement to the man who is tempt- 
ed to ero into the slashing business. The 
day is here when we must win business 
on smoother methods than selling 
staples below cost. The merchant who 
cannot win business on these better 
methods is due for a shoot down the 
slide sooner or later. 



TO THE VARNISH BUYER 

the most serious considerations are quality, reliability and 
uniformity, and these qualifications are of special importance to 
the dealer who is trying to build up a permanent varnish trade. 

Berry Brothers' label or brand may be safely relied upon as 
ensuring the above conditions. 

Our varnishes are the safest goods to handle and the surest and 
most reliable goods to use. 

BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

VRNISH MANUFACTURERS 

WALRERVILLE, ONT. 

Write for our 100 page illustrated catalogue. Every dealer should have a copy for reference. 



48 



January 13, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



CANADA PAINT EXTENSIONS. 

Owing to the pressure of their increas- 
ing business, the Canada Paint Company 
have for some tim.e past been cramped 
for room in their Montreal plant. As 
Ihcir ground space was already almost 
entirely taken up, the directors con- 
ceived the idea of extending the wing 
devoted to the varnish tank department, 
thus utilizing the remaining ground 
space and giving a splendid additional 
floor area by adding another storey to 
this wing. The result has been a sur- 
prising improvement in conditions, and 
has put the company's facilities in the 
very front rank bf Canadian paint indus- 
tries. 

A Hardware and Metal representative 
who was shown through the works re- 



vertising department, where they are 
cut into small pieces and gummed (by 
machinery) to the sample cards. 

The next department visited was the 
dry grinding mill, where the paints are 
ground up in machinery which is oper- 
ated on much the same principle as that 
of an ordinary flour mill. The stock and 
packing rooms are adjacent, while on 
the next floor below is the shipping 
room proper, with the superintendent's 
office. Entering another part of the 
buildinp- we come to the printers' ink 
department, where ink in different col- 
ors is manufactured by the Frontenac 
Ink Works, a subsidiary company. A 
separate wing is now reached by a short 
bridge, and here the "specials" depart- 
ment is found. Its mission is to manu- 



each mixer holds 200 gallons, and I he 
daily capacity is over 2,000 gallons. 

An interesting process is seen in the 
lead and putty room. Here the dry 
white lead and oil are mixed in chasers, 
and passed to the pulp mixers. A belt 
there feeds the product to two sets of 
rolls. A double-mixing- and double-roll- 
ing system is in operation in this room, 
the daily output of which is over 22 
tons. The varnish and oil department, 
situated in this wing, is entirely fire- 
proof. It is here that the varnish is 
stored, matured, and prepared for ship- 
ment. 

The dry color works of the company 
are next reached, these being situated in 
a separate building. Here are the kilns 
for drying the colors. They are taken 




Canada Paint Company's Montreal plant, showing recent extensions to the Varnish Tank Department. 



cently was much impressed with the 
spirit ol thoroughness which pervades all 
the departments of the company. On the 
third floor of the main building is sit- 
uated the advertising department, where 
color cards are made up for the different 
customers according to their require- 
ments. Many labels (in fact, all except 
those which are lithographed) are print- 
ed here also, and a large staff is em. 
ployed getting out the company's varied 
advertising matter. Leaving this room, 
a large warehouse is entered, where 
oxides are stored. Kalsomine is also 
packed here by a most ingenious device. 
The painting "department, which is real- 
ly a branch of the advertising depart- 
ment, is situated close at hand. It is 
here that the color sheets- are painted 
and dried before being taken to the ad- 



facture stains, oils, paints and other ar- 
ticles outside the ordinary run of goods. 
Artists' tubes are filled in this room. It 
is on this wing that the extension has 
been made. Consisting of four flats, it 
will enlarge departments on all the 
floors. The construction of this new 
wing is of the most modern kind,. Heavy 
fire doors of the latest make are so 
hung as to be opened and closed with 
the greatest ease. Mill flooring is used 
throughout, and an automatic sprinkler 
system minimizes the danger of fire. 

The mixing department (in the vicin- 
ity of which the dry colors are stored) 
is one of the features of the building. 
Every arrangement is here made to save 
manual labor in conveying the heavy 
lead and other ingredients to the mix- 
ers. In the liquid paint department, 

49 



out of these kilns in lumps, put through 
the grinding machine, and then stored. 
A large store shed is a constituent part 
of this building. 

The Canada Paint Co. operate their 
own electric lighting plant, the machin- 
ery being run by water power. They also 
employ their own mechanics in every de- 
partment for the purpose of making re- 
newals, repairs, and extensions. The 
company naturally feel gratified at the 
large increase their business has ex- 
perienced during J 905, and they have 
made every effort to equip themselves 
for a greater output this year. 



Not how much, but how often, is the 
way to handle your advertising proposi- 
tion. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 




LOOKING TOWARDS SPRING. 

WITH Christmas over and the holiday trade a thing- 
of the past, merchants can now turn their atten- 
tion with some degree of care to the necessaries 
for Spring. Will this Spring's business bulk up more 
than last year's ? That is the important question, be- 
cause week for week and month for month the merchant 
should attempt to excel his previous records. 

To accomplish this there must be no let-up in energy 
and enterprise. Make all the departments go with 
an additional hum. Take time to look over every man's 
samples. There is no knowing when something may turn 
up which will just suit your particular trade. Even if 
there is nothing you want it will freshen you up to take 
a look at what others are buying. 

However, there is another way to increase business, 
and that is to take a department which has not hitherto 
been pushed, or has been altogether neglected, and make 
a feature of it. 

Profit in Wall Paper. 

Have you really worked the wall paper department 
for all it was worth in the past ? The chances are you 
haven't. Supposing you lay out from now till Spring to 
open up a good live campaign. Make your selection of 
papers now when you have the complete range to choose 
from. Plan big. Order enough to make a good big 
showing. You can do this without any great expenditure 
of capital, for wall paper can be bought in very cheap 
grades. 

You will not find a department which will prove more 
satisfactory than this. It is neat, clean stuff to handle ; 
it is sold in definite quantities, that is to say, in com- 
plete rolls ; there is no cutting nor measuring required ; 
and finally, it is sold in large enough quantities to make 
each sale worth while. 

Prepare in Advance. 

Anticipation is the keynote for the present. The de- 
partment is quiescent now, but none the less, now is the 
time to complete preparations. Selections should be made 
and the necessary quantity estimated. Then decide upon 
the way you will handle the stock, where you will keep 
it and how bring it before the public. 

It is too often the case that merchants do not look 
beyond the week in which they are living. After all, is 
not this one of the chief reasons of success for such men 
as Timothy Eaton, namely, that they can see far enough 
ahead to anticipate the wants of the public ? Be provi- 
dent and decide upon your course now while you have 
time. Novel schemes for assisting sales should be figured 
out during the quiet season, not while the stress of busi- 
ness is upon one. 



"Yes," said the general merchant, "it is true that 
we propose to establish a hospital as an adjunct to our 
store." "To treat the victims of the bargain rushes ?" 
was asked. "Yes, but that is merely a beginning. Later 
on I expect to see the business branch out, and I dare 
say we shall treat all comers for all sorts of complaints 
at exceptionally low figures. In my mind's eye I can 
see our advertisement reading : 

" 'SPECIAL THIS DAY ONLY ! 

' 'Appendicitis Operations at Cut Rates. 

' 'Positively, Only One Operation to Each Customer ! 

' 'Satisfaction Guaranteed or Appendix Replaced 

and 

" 'Money Refunded !' " 

—Puck. 




McArthur, Corneille & Co. 

MONTREAL 

Glue and Gelatine 



An extensive assortment, to suit ell requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



~^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 



of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 
Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 



of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



50 



January 13, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 











Stoves and Tinware 











GOOD TIN ROOFING. 

The lasting qualities of the tin roof 
are dependent on both the manufacturer 
and the roofing contractor, says the 
Metal Worker. It is a matter of com- 
mon knowledge that there are tin roofs 
on buildings in different sections of the 
country which have been in use half a 
century and give promise of equally long 
future service. A roofing contractor 
calls the attention of the manufacturer 
to these roofs when he has complaint 
about roofs that have been put on with- 
in the last decade. That there is cause 
for complaint about service rendered by 
some roofs is not only evident, but this 
fact has had a tendencv to make many 
builders seriously consider the use of 
slate or shingles and so change the ar- 
chitecture of the building as to render 
the use of these materials practicable. 

It is not necessary to go further into 
an explanation of the existing condi- 
tions. It is far better to give some at- 
tention to the causes creating it. The 
black sheets which are the basis of all 
tin and terne plates are steel to-day, 
whereas the old tin plates were made of 
iron. The fact that formerly tin plates 
were made of iron was the cause of no 
small annoyance in the early days from 
the breaking along seams, and the diffi- 
culty in working them easily, which is 
not found with the soft steel plates of 
to-day. These troubles of the early days 
are unknown to some of the complain- 
ants of this time and are possibly for- 
gotten by the older roofers. 

The Coating of the Plate. 

Another point that it has been con- 
venient to forget is the character and 
weight of the coating of the early 
plates. There was less variation in the 
amount of the coating and a greater per- 
centage of tin entered into it than into 
the coating of the roofing plates now in 
general use. The quality and thickness 
of this coating not only securely pro- 
tected the iron sheet, but was an im- 
portant factor in prolonging the life of 
the roof. Since the manufacture of tin 
plate has assumed proportions in this 
country the price is largely governed by 
the weight of the coating, so that the 
roofer can secure either a skim-coated 
sheet or as heavily coated sheets as the 
earlier roofers universally used. It is 
simply a matter of price. If heavily 
coated sheets are purchased then usually 
the roofer has a right to complain if the 
coating is not applied in such a manner 
as to thoroughly protect the steel sheet 
generally used in terne plates of this 
day. It is possible that the coating is 
not always applied with as great care 
as is essential to long continued dura- 
bility. These are conditions over which 
the manufacturer has absolute control, 
and if any of the operations are not 
completed with that thoroughness and 
care which are essential to long life of 
the finished product the manufacturer 
should be brought to account. 

It is not fair, however, for the roofers 
who are purchasing the cheapest tin 



plates on the market and those which 
carry the least coating to bring the tin 
roof into disrepute as the result of 
their own selections. The manufacturer 
cannot be expected to escape all censure 
for catering to this demand. His posi- 
tion is of greater responsibility, and he 
can be justly expected to protect not 
onfy his own reputation but the reputa- 
tion of the tin roof by withdrawing the 
cheaper and less durable plates from the 
market and expending more energy in 
the sale and use of heavilv coated plates. 
A great deal has been said by both the 
roofers and those who sell tin plates 
about pin holes in roof plates. It is a 
matter of vital importance and only re- 
quires a conscientious investigation to 
discover the cause and remove it. Some 
difference of opinion exists as to the 
cause. Roofers claim that the plates are 
not made of as good material as those 




Types of French Stoves, 

of the early day. Manufacturers, on the 
other hand, state that too many of the 
lightly coated plates are purchased and 
that sufficient care is not taken in the 
protection of the plates after they are 
put on the roof. 

The Protective Covering. 
This brings to light another important 
factor in the durability' of 'the roof. In 
the early days there was a greater dis- 
position to use the best material, and a 
mixture of red lead and good linseed oil 
was the basis of the paint used on roofs. 
Later on cheaper materials that furnish- 
ed the necessary bodv were substituted 
for the red lead, but the linseed oil was 
still the principal protecting agent. To 
still further cheapen the body of the 
paint materials which are said to be de- 
structive have been used. Some of these 
body materials or colors have been found 
upon analysis to contain sulphur to the 
extent of 1 to 3 per cent, and have been 
used in connection with manufactured 
oils in which good linseed oil is not used 
to the extent of even 50 per cent. In 
many instances quick driers have been 

51 



so largely used that the paint cracks 
and curls or scales from the material 
which it is intended to protect. It has 
none of Hie elasticity of a good linseed 
oil paint. 

The use of paints which have e\ 
small percentage of sulDhur has been 
proved disastrous to the plate, even 
when heavily coated, and much more 
quickly when a plate with a light coat- 
ing is used. The exposure of such plates 
to the atmosphere with its contained 
moisture has the effect, under the right 
conditions, of developing sulphuric or 
sulnhurous acid, which starts rust 
spots at innumerable small points, gen- 
erally known as pin holes. 

Considerable studv has been given to 
this subject by both manufacturers and 
roofers desirous of building up and main- 
taining a good reputation. It has been 
noted that wherever an old roofer with 
an excellent reputation has an influence 
on any considerable section of country 
there is less complaint from pin hole tin 
plate than from other sections where 
sharp competition governs the trade. 
The roofer with a desire to maintain 
his reputation secures a price that will 
enable him to. use a heavily coated 
plate. Another of his customs is to use 
a good paint having a body material 
ground in oil and to use a larger per- 
centage of good linseed oil in mixing it 
than is customary in the competition 
districts. 

A Subject for Discussion. 
In view of the many complaints that 
are brought to tin plate houses and the 
interest which the trade is taking in the 
subject, and the fact that hesitation is 
manifest on the part of some builders as 
to the use of tin plates on their build- 
ings, these ideas have been presented for 
the consideration of the trade. There 
can be no doubt that some benefit will 
be derived if all concerned will look 
closely into the suggestions as to the 
cause of the trouble and the remedies. 
AH may not agree with the ideas pre- 
sented, and the experience of those who 
have the welfare of the trade at heart 
will be gladlv received should thev care 
to discuss this subject. It must be clear 
that no benefit will be derived from, an 
extended enumeration of the troubles of 
those who have not raven that discrimi- 
nating care to their purchases which is 
essential to building up any branch of 
trade. Such experiences are well known 
already. Great benefit, however, will 
come from a presentation of the infor- 
mation that has been gained by the more 
successful manufacturers and roofers, 
who are invited to discuss this impor- 
tant question with a view to discover- 
ing the cause of the trouble and apply- 
ing a remedy. 

FRENCH STOVES IN ENGLAND. 

A 48-hour stove which is gaining favor 
in England is shown in the accompany- 
ing illustration, it being a product of the 
Godin works at Guise, France. The pat- 
tern is made in four sizes, between 53 
and 60 inches high, which have heating 
capacities of from 5,300 to 10,fiOO cubic 
feet of space. As will be seen, the out- 
let is at a height which allows of the 
stove being used in front of an ordinary 
register opening, and provision is made 
for keeping the air moist. The Godin 
stoves, although designed for anthracite, 
pre coually suitable for coal and coke. 

English papers sav it is a curious fact 
that while the English market has only 



Hardware and Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



January 13, 1906 



slowl) accepted the French models, 

which are undoubtedly economical in fuel 
consumption, the colonies have taken 
numbers, especially patterns fin- 
ished in vitreous enamels, both self color 
and decorated. 

CHEAP SHEARS FOR CUTTING 
TIN. 

A novel device tor cut tins; tin is shown 
in the accompanying illustration. The 
materials required are two old 16-inch 
tiles, a small bolt, a block of wood and 
a couple of screws. Cut one of the dies 
the length you wish the knife (shown 
"A" in tiie cut) to be. and grind one 
side and one edge sharp and square. 
Drill holes in the top for fastening the 
knife to the block of wood, using the 
screws. Grind the top and edge of the 
other file ("B") sharp and square. Drill 
a hole in the end and mount the file on 
the wood with a bolt. Tin, sheet iron, 
etc.. can be cut with this device very 
satisfactorily. 




Cheap Shears for Cutting Tin. 

SYDNEY'S IRON INDUSTRY. 

The stove foundry of the A. C. 
Thompson Co., at North Sydney, is 
now selling its goods to merchants in 
all parts of Quebec and the Maritime 
Provinces, according to a recent report. 
Speaking of the outlook for 1906, As- 
sistant Manager Treen said prospects 
were very bright. The company is put- 
ting in some new lines of heating and 
cooking stoves. North Sydney, having 
iron, coal and coke so convenient, is an 
ideal spot for stove manufacture. The 
Reliance hot water boiler is another 
line manufactured, and the manufacture 
of soil pipe will be commenced early 
next Summer. This branch of the work 
will add considerably to the number of 
men employed about the plant. The 
only soil pipe at present made in the 
Maritime Provinces is turned out by 
the Londonderry Pipe Foundry Co. 

HARDWARE TRADE ITEMS. 

How is the stock of stove pipe, 

elbows, etc.? No telling when you will 

get a call for a lot of these. 

• • 
• 

Make the stove or furnace that heats 
your store a perpetual demonstration. 
Keep it in good shape and show the 



prospective customer how easy it is to 
take care of and how little fueL it burns 
for the heat obtained. 



Keep the accessories moving — the 
drums, radiators, registers, and all the 
smaller things that increase the effi- 
cacy of the stove. 

* . • 

Don't worry about your competitor. 
Sill stoves at the best prices you can 
and make a reasonable profit. That is 
what your aim should be. 



Don't be afraid to ask the manufac- 
turers for cuts to use in your stove 
advertising. They are always glad to 
help you in every way to advertise their 
line. 



MAKING COLD DRAWN SHAFTING. 

LESS than a year ago no cold-drawn 
shafting was made in Canada. 
Now there are in Canada two 
large plants, one already manufactur- 
ing and the other rapidly approaching 
that position. The requirements of any 
factory always constitute with it a 
large amount of shafting, and upon this 
and its proper adjustment and bearings 
depends to considerable extent the pow- 
er economy of operating the plant. Very 
special machinery is required' for the 
manufacture of cold-drawn shafting, and 
the equipment seen in the plant of the 
Union Drawn Steel Co., at Hamilton, 
is a revelation to any one not convers- 
ant with this line of manufacture. Prob- 
ably in no other line of metal working 
machinery are such long beds required 
nor such lengthy and ponderous driving 
gears. 

The raw material of the cold-drawn 
steel company's plant is the finished 
product of the rolling mills. The first 
operation consists of placing the bars to 
be drawn in a bath, where they are 
thoroughly cleaned. The operations are 
few but all important. The material is 
then taken to one of the heavy drawing 
machines and drawn through a solid die 
of the exact size correct to 2-1,000 of 
an inch. From this machine it passes 
through a specially designed straight- 
ening machine, and from there to the 
cntting-off machine, where it is cut the 
exact length ordered. When the length 
has been cut off as desired every bar is 
tested on live rollers the same as if it 
were running on centres. Any crooks 
or bends that may have existed in the 
bar after leaving the cutting-off ma- 
chine are thus removed. 

Tn addition to the drawing machines, 
where any suze of shaft up to three 
inches mav be drawn, a lathe has been 
installed to turn shafting from 3 to 9 
inches, with no limit to the lene-th ex- 
cent, of course, that of the building, 
which is bv no means of small propor- 
tion. This is the onlv stvle of machine 
in existence that finishes the shaft com- 
plete and readv for use after coming 
from the rolling mill. 

Tt mie-ht be presumed from this that 
the equipment of a cold drawn shafting 
plant is small, but this is not the casff. 
As the special machines required are all 
of enormous size, and the multiplicity 
of gears and belting remu'red in running 
these, from the larce induction motors 
that have been installed, is bewildering 
on first sight. As a particular favor and 
52 



departure from usual custom, the repre- 
sentative of Canadian Machinery was 
shown through the plant mentioned, and 
is indebted to Mr. A. J. McMahon for 
the interesting insight into the method 
of manufacturing cold-drawn shafting, 
whose manufacture requires not only 
machines of enormous power but of re- 
markable accuracy. 

It is announced that the Bruce Mines 
have been transferred to the Copper & 
Smelter Co. of Ontario. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned, 
and endorsed "Tender for metallic fittings for Post 
Office Department, Ottawa, Ont.," will be received at 
tin's office until Saturday, January 20, 1906, inclusively, 
for the construction of metallic fittings for Savings Bank 
branch, Ottawa, Ont., Post Office. 

Plans and specifications can be seen and forms of 
tender obtained at this Department. 

Persons tendering are notified that tenders will not 
be considered unless made oil the printed form supplied, 
and signed with their actual signatures. 

Each tender must be accompanied by an accepted 
cheque on a chartered bank, made payable to the order 
of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, equal 
to ten per cent. (10 p.c.) ot the amount of the tender, 
which will be forfeited if the party tendering decline to 
enter into a contract when called upon to do so, or if 
he fail to complete the work contracted for. If the 
tender be not accepted the cheque will be returned. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order., 
FRED. GELINAS, 

Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, January 10, 1906. 
Newspapers inserting this advertisement without 
authority from the Department, will not be paid for 
it. (2) 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned 
and endorsed " Tender for Hamilton Wharf," will 
be received at this office up to and including February 5, 
1906, inclusively, for the construction of a wharf in the 
City of Hamilton, Wentworth County, Ont., according 
to a plan and specification to be seen at the office of J. 
G. Sing, Esq., Resident Engineer, Confederation Life 
Building, Toronto, on application to the Postmaster of 
Hamilton, Ont., and at the Department of Public- 
Works, Ottawa. 

Tenders will not be considered unless made on the 
printed form supplied, and signed with the actual signa- 
tures of tenderers. 

An accepted cheque on a chartered bank, payable to the 
order of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, 
for eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00), must accompany 
each tender. The cheque will be forfeited if the party 
tendering decline the contract or fail to complete the 
work contracted for, and will be returned in case of non- 
acceptance of tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order, 

FRED. GELINAS, 



Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, December 16, 1905. 



Secretary. 



Newspapers inserting this advertisement witho llt 
uthority from the Department will not be paid f or 

• (3) 



January 13, 1906 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal 



Ventilation is Important 



as a feature of modern buildings. 

There are many buildings and residences, 
whose occupants are afflicted with drowsiness 
and headaches, because the ventilation is im- 
perfect, or his been altogether neglected. 

THE AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

is unexcelled as a means of producing pure 
air in large buildings, closet rooms, vaults of 
churches, schools, factories, stables, etc. 

As will be seen from the accompanying il- 
lustration, The Aeolian Ventilator is very 
ornamental in appearance, while also posses- 
sing exceptional lasting qualities. 

We like to talk about the "Aeolian" 

Will you write us for particulars ? 

Read this testimonial : 

Ottawa, June 4th, 1903. 
Messrs. The J. W. Harris Co., Limited, Montreal. 
Gentlemen— In reply to your letter of 1st of June 
instant, beg to say the "Akolia-n" Ventilators we 
got from you have always proved satisfactory to us 
and we can recommend them where such an article is 
required. Yours respectfully, 

McKlNLEY & NORTHWOOI). 

The Price is Inconsiderable in Comparison with the Results. 
Manufactured by 

THE J. W. HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 

SUCCESSORS TO LESSARD & HARRIS, CONTRACTORS 
Montreal 




THE AEOLIAN VENTILATOR 

(Can be supplied in cop- 
per, if so desired.) 



Stands Every Test 

"" THE EMPIRE 

QUEEN 
RANGE 

stands every test 
because it is con- 
structed with an 
eye to economy, 
efficiency, appear, 
ance. In addition, 
it is easy to clean, 
looks well, and has 
all the latest fea. 
i tures without the 
unessentials. 

The Empire Queen 
Range is an ideal 
baker, so the woman's ideal stove. 

If you are not carrying The Empire Queen Range, you are missing 
just that much business. 

Agents wanted. 8end for Booklet. 




The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 

OWEN SOUND, Ontario 



Limited, 



THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limited, 238 King St., Winnipeg, Man. 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., 126 West Craig St., 
Montreal, Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



"Samson" Milk Can Trimmings 




BQDY 



Section of "Samson" Milk Can Bottom. 



Strongest, neatest, most sanitary 
and only one-piece bottom made. 



Has no seams or rivets to corrode and collect dirt. 

Every bottom in each size is of an exact diameter. Being stamped out 
with a die — not spun — there can be no variation as in a bottom made in 
several pieces. 

Requires less solder and work in putting together than pieced bottoms — 
also wears longer. —^^—-—2==^=====^ 

Th© IN/lcOlary Manufacturing Oo. 



LONDON, 



TORONTO, 



MONTREAL, 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER, 



ST. JOHN, N.B. 



HAMILTON 



'Everything -for the Tinshop." 



53 



Hardware and Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



January 13, 1906 



A Reputation-Building Range 

The quality of your wares should build up your reputation and talk strong for a bigger volume of business all the time. 

We are great sticklers for QUALITY. Every article we manufacture is up to 
the top notch of perfection. 

Quality is stamped all over and through and through the 




Oxford Chancellor Range 



and to say it ought to be on your floor is putting it mildly. 

The Oxford Chancellor is durable, economical, a perfect cooking apparatus and 
a trade winner. 

The body of this range is constructed of the best quality cold rolled steel sheets. 
It burns hard or soft coal or wood. Fire-box fittings are furnished for either coal or 
wood or both, as desired. 

The oven is roomy in all sizes. 

An additional draft slide is placed at the top of the fire-door, making the Oxford 
Chancellor the most economical fuel consumer on the market. 

The Reservoir of planished copper is placed next the fire-box and heats very 
quickly. It can be attached or detached by any one in a few minutes. 
Our guarantee bond goes with every range. The Oxford Chancellor is handsome in appearance and easily kept clean. 

It certainly will pay you to put the Oxford Chancellor on your floor — it sells itself. 

Send for Catalogue 61. 

\A/E also manufacture Cast Iron Stoves and Ranges. Gas Stoves, Ranges and Heaters, Hotel Ranges and complete Hotel Kitchen Outfits, 
* " Warm Air Furnaces and all kinds of cooking and heating apparatus, Plumbers' Supplies. 

The Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 



TORONTO 

The Gurney-Massey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. 



WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 8 3 

The Gurney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta. 



Grimsby, Ont., Jan. i, 1906. 
To the Trade : 

In extending to you our very best wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year, we 
trust the past year has yielded both pleasure and profit and that the experience gained will 
enable you better than ever to push onward to the goal of success. 

For our customers of 1905 we have the most kindly feeling. We appreciate their 
favors and kindnesses and most sincerely hope to have a continuation of same. 

On the other hand, added facilities and new lines will enable us to serve you better than 
ever and to care for those new customers which we earnestly hope to secure. 

For 1906 we call your attention to 

Walker Stoves and Ranges 

" SUCCESSFUL EVERYWHERE " 

and wish to say that all our experience, energy and time will be devoted to making 
good this motto. 

Sincerely yours, 

The Walker Steel Range Company, Limned 

Grimsby, Ont. 



54 



January 13, 1906 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal 




" VICTORIA " IMPROVED 
COAL GRATE 

24%x30>£. Dump Grate. Double Damper 



•'MADE IN CANADA" 

Take note of it. In your neit 
order specify 

Mantel 
Coal Grates 

liuisliert in Oxidized Copper, Brass 
or Dull Black. 

Mantel Coal Grates are fast winning 
favor. 

Wouldn't you like to sell them ? 

Whittaker Stove Works 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



A BRIGHT STORE 

PLEASES YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTS BUSINESS 
SAVES TIME 

A modern Acetylene plant will light your 
store perfectly and economically. Ask 
us about it. 

THE CONTINENTAL HEAT & LIGHT GO. 

MONTREAL 




A GUARANTEE 

THAT MEANS SOMETHING 

If any stove dealer receives 

Sterne's 

Asbestos Stove and 

Furnace Cement 

and is not satisfied with it, or if he 
does not find it exactly as represented, 
or if he has any reason for returning 
it, or if he returns it without any 
reason, he may have his money back 
by return mail, without "any talk." 



6. F. STERNE & SON, MANUFAC I" R " S r i 



BRANTFORD, ONT. 



WANTED TINSMITH 

The best medium in Canada in which to advertise 
for tinsmiths is Hardware and Metal. 

Hardware and Metal will bring you replies from all 
parts of Canada. Last week one of our advertisers 
received a reply from the Yukon. 

Enclose money with ad. 

Rate: 2c. per word for first insertion. 

ic. per word for subsequent issues. 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 



The New 

National Oak 

HeaLer 

For Hard or Soft Coal, Lignite, Coke or Wood 

Smoke consuming. Double Heater from floor. 
Duplex Crates. Double Mica Door. Straight, Deep 
Firepot. Deep Reflector Ring. Hot Blast Ring is 
entirely outside — does not obstruct interior. Smoke 
Pipe Collar is in rear of double-heating collar. No 
Elbows or Offsets required to connect with double- 
heating flue. 




I 

X 



T Made only by 

| the MOFFAT STOVE CO., limited 

4 winnipec WESTON, ONT. calcary 

♦ No other manufacturer in the world has a stove just like 

▲ this. In brief, it's the biggest, tallest and best stove of its kind ever 

X offered. Places you absolutely beyond competition. Seize the oppor- 
tunity and write for the agency to-day. 



*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




56 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Class 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



WINDOW 



GLASS 



PLATE 

GLASS 



TORONTO 

MONTREAL 

OTTAWA 

LONDON 

WINNIPEG 



Building and Industrial News 

Rajldii u;> vm'.Mi ■:m would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source building and industrial news 
oi any son. the formation or Incorporation ol companies, estaouBhmenl or enlargement o! mills, 
i lundi ies or other works, railway or mining news. All correspondence will be 
treated as confidential when desired. 



A large new saw mill is to be built 
at Beaudette, on the Rainy River, next 

Spring. 

Owing to the defeat of the bonus by- 
law, the proposed box factory is not to 
be built at Stratford. 

The Canadian Pacific are rapidly 
pushing ahead the work of double- 
tracking between Winnipeg and Fort 
William. 

The Quebec Central Railway intends 
to build several branch lines this year, 
and will enter Quebec City over the 
new bridge when it is completed. 

Contracts have been signed and it is 
now assured that the Patent Roofing 
Company of Lafayette, Ind., will estab- 
lish a branch factory at Brantford. 

Mr. R. J. Elwell, of Boston, is set- 
ting up the machinery of the Brant- 
ford Felt & Rubber Company, in the 
building formerly occupied by the 
Bailey Cutlery Company, at Brantford. 

The Klondyke Mines Railway is to be 
built from Dawson to Stewart Cross- 
ing, a distance of 84 miles. T. W. 
O'Brien has been in the east and has 
successfully arranged the financing of 
the project. 

About two hundred men are engaged 
in the shipyards of the B. C. Marine 
Railway Company, at Victoria. A 
large steamer is being built for the 
C.P.R., and several smaller vessels are 
also under construction. 

Three hundred tons of steel rails are 
being shipped to North Vancouver, 
where they will be used in the con- 
struction of a tram line through the 
townsite recently laid out across the 
inlet from the city of Vancouver. 

H. H. Collier, solicitor for the Buf- 
falo, Niagara & Toronto Railway, says 
that building operations will commence 
early in the Spring. The proposed line 
wi}l run from Niagara-on-the-Lake to 
Buffalo, through St. David's and 
Bridgeburg, with a branch to St. 
Catharines and Welland. 

By-laws to raise $20,000 for improve- 
ments for waterworks, $14,000 for elec- 
tric light, and $12,000 for telephone 
improvements, and to give Whalen & 
Bowman exemption from taxes to build 
a marine drydock and machine shop, 
were carried at Fort William on Janu- 
ary 1 by large majorities. 

The Michigan Central Railway Com- 
pany have been building a few engines 
at their shops at St. Thomas, but 
have decided to discontinue this work, 
as it is now possible to buy engines 
cheaper in Montreal than they can be 
built for at St. Thomas. The change 
will mean a reduction in working force 
of about forty men. 

The Southern Light & Power Com- 
pany, Toronto, an enterprise closely 
associated with the York County Loan 
Company, has been declared insolvent, 
and the company will be wound up. 
They are in debt to the Canadian 
Portland Cement Company to the am- 

66 



ount of $1,700, and many other claims 
have been made against them. 

The McLaughlin boiler shop, St. 
John, N.B., has-been reopened, after 
several years' idleness. It has been 
leased to Alex. Wilson, mechanical en- 
gineer, and James O'Donnell, .boiler 
maker, who have the sub-contract for 
supplying the iron work for the I.C.R, 
A company will be formed and about 
50 men given employment in building 
boilers and in a machine shop to be 
established. 

D. K. Ross, commercial agent in 
Australia, has advised the Department 
of Trade and Commerce that the im- 
portations of Canadian farm machinery 
into Australia are increasing. During 
the months of September, October and 
November, Victoria alone imported 
3,000 tons of this class of implements 
from Canada, and the total importa- 
tions into the whole of Australia in 
that period exceeded 6,000 tons. In 
addition large shipments were on their 
way. Progress is being made in intro- 
ducing Canadian cultivators, plows, 
harrows and sewing machines. 

The Grand Trunk has decided to 
spend more than a million dollars by 
placing the following exceptionally large 
orders for motive power : Ten ten- 
wheel passenger engines, with the Lo- 
comotive & Machine Company, Mont- 
real; ten ten-wheel passenger engines, 
with the Locomotive Company, New 
York; fifteen Richmond compound con- 
solidated engines, Locomotive & Ma- 
chine Company, Montreal; six Rich- 
mond compound consolidated engines, 
Canada Foundry Company', Toronto; 40 
Richmond compound consolidated en- 
gines, Locomotive & Machine Company, 
Montreal, making in all 81 locomotives, 
20 of which are passenger and 61 
freight engines. As the former cost 
approximately $15,000 each and the 
latter $18,000 each, the total outlay 
represented amounts to $1,398,000. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway Com- 
pany intend to proceed with the con- 
struction of a new trunk line from 
Winnipeg to Edmonton, about 800 
miles in length. The route will be 
some distance to the south of the Can- 
adian Northern, and well to the north 
of the present C.P.R. main line to Cal- 
gary. The company will utilize the 
Manitoba & Northwestern line, and 
will have about 500 miles to construct. 
The line is expected to be in operation 
before the end of 1907. Work at both 
ends and in the middle will be simul- 
taneously pushed forward. The com- 
pany has mow in hand in the Northwest 
work which will involve within the next 
two years an expenditure of between 
$5,000,000 and $6,000,000. It has also 
been decided to proceed forthwith with 
the construction of a high level bridge 
across the Saskatchewan River, which 
would enable the railway to enter the 
city. The cost of this bridge, with 
the two miles of additional track that 



January 13, 1906 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



Hardware and Metal 



the extension will involve, will be about 
+2,000,000. 

The Grand Trunk Railway Companj 
have issued the following statement 
giving details of the work decided on 
in order to supply electrical energy at 
St. Clair tunnel. The contract has been 
awarded to the Westinghouse Electric 
& Manufacturing Company. The work 
is to be started at once, and brought 
to completion as quickly as possible. 
The system that will be adopted is 
known as the alternating current sys- 
tem, with overhead conductors, the 
conductors in the interior of the tunnel 
being placed upon the walls and in the 
J railway yards, and will be supported by 
steel bridg-es. The rails will be oper- 
ated by alternating current. Locomo- 
tives capable of hauling a passenger 
train on the grade at the rate of 20 to 
25 miles an hour and a freight train of 
10,000 tons at the rate of ten miles an 
hour, will be used. The interior of the 
tunnel and the vards on both the Unit- 
ed States' and Canadian sides of the 
St. Clair will be lighted by electricity 
from the power generated in the exten- 
sive power house that it will be neces- 
sary to erect. The length of the tun- 
nel proper is P>,025 feet, and of the 
open portal approaches 5,603 feet addi- 
tional, or more than two miles in all, 
making it one of the longest submarine 
tunnels in the world. 

Companies Incorporated. 

Siche G-as Co., Toronto, share capi- 
tal $100,000; purpose, to manufacture, 
sell and operate gas apparatus and 
sunplies. The directors are F. L. H. 
Sims, J. H. Chewett, and R. G. Hun- 
ter, all of Toronto. 

Thorold Natural Gas Co., Toronto, 
share capital $40,000; purpose, to re- 
fine petroleum oil. natural gas, manu- 
factured eras, or electricity. The direc- 
tors are C. A. Moss, W. Gilchrist, and 
J. A. Thompson, all of Toronto. 

Vermillion River Iron Ore Co., To- 
ronto, share capital $80,000: purpose, 
to carry on the operations of a murine. 
milling reduction and development 
eompanl. The directors are F. .1. Ren- 
ton, J. W. McRonald and Ella A. 
Francis, all of Toronto. 

C. Parsons & Son, Toronto, share 
capital $150,000: mirnose. to carry on 
the business of tanners, dealers in 
hides, leather, etc. The directors are C. 
Parsons, W. O. Parsons. Frances S. 
Parsons. Alice E. Parsons, and J. E. 
Roswell, all of Toronto. 

Rvmond Revelonmcnt Co.. Ottawa, 
share capital $250,000; purpose, to 
carry on the business of a minine\ mill- 
insr, reduction and develonment com- 
pany. The directors are C. W. F. Gor- 
rp\]. A. T. Shillinp-ton. of Ottawa, and 
R. J. Arnold. W. L. Arnold, and P. O. 
Arnold, of Chicago, Rl. 

Wendifo Progressive Minin" - & De- 
velopment Go., New r Liskeard, share 
capital $40,000- mirnose. to carry on 
the business of a mining-, milling, re- 
duction and develonment company. The 
directors are J. Cox. S. R. Enlett. of 
New Liskeard. and O. W. Slade and J. 
W. Foreman, of Rvmond township. 

The Excelsion Rabbit & Car Bearing 1 
Co. has been organized at Moncton, 
\ T .B.. bv Joseph R. Stratton, R. A. 
Rorden. E. M. Jones. Jas. P. Ross. 
Moncton; and Edmund Simpson. Petit- 



codiac. The object is to manufacture 
and deal in babbit and other anti-fric- 
tion metals, car bearings, etc. The 
capital stock is to be $1011, CHI). 

Terrill Cobalt Mining Co., Sault Ste 
Marie, share capital $1(10,000; pur] 
to carry on the business of a mining, 
milling, reduction and development 
company. The directors are W. E. 
Gimby, D. I. Millar, A. G. Terrill, W. 
B. Moorehouse, A. Mclntyre, G. Wool- 
rich and E. Pogcrs, all of Sault Ste 
Marie; R. H. Schultz, of Toronto, and 
11. II. Tavlor, Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 



BUILDING NOTES. 

St. Luke's congregation, Halifax, are 
to build a new cathedral. 

Frank Holmes, Nutana, Sask., is call- 
ing for tenders for the construction of 
a school house. 

A new Baptist church is to be built 
on Ossinerton avenue, Toronto, at a 
cost of $10,000. 

The Woodstock Collegiate Institute 
board are considering the question of 
building a new school. 

The Credit Foncier Franco-Canadien 
has purchased a site in Winnineg. with 
a frontage of 00 feet, and will build a 
large bank structure next Spring. 

W. H. Northcote, Hamilton, has se- 
cured a permit to build a brick house 
in that city, to cost $1,800. and Mark 
Lawrence is to build one to cost $1,700, 

L. O. Orothe & Co., cie-ar manufac- 
turers. Montreal, have purchased a site 
for $32,500. and propose to erect fac- 
torv buildings. etc.. to cost about 
$200,000. 

CFMENT COATED WIRE NAILS 

For over fifty years the use of wire 
nails has been general in Enrone. where 
thev have entirelv superseded the old 
hand-forced and cut. nails. Tt is onlv in 
recent vears that the conservative Eng- 
lishman has recognized their snneri- 
oritv. while in China and Ja»an wooden 
peers have Ion" - been discarded and lar°-e 
importations of wire nails are made 
from the United States and Europe, 
writes A. C. Rnlofson in Hardware. 

Twenty-five venrs aco the manufac- 
ture of wire n^i'ls commenced, in a 
small wav. in the United States, and 
at that time a shinmont of 25 Ve.es was 
made to one of the largest of the lead- 
ing wholesale houses in San Francisco. 
This marked the introduction of wire 
nails on the Pacific Coast and their 
consumption increased with leans and 
bounds, so that in a short time thev 
almost entirelv drove out the old stvle 
cut nail which was being manufactured 
in Oakland, California. 

Tn the course of a few vears the cut 
nail manufacturers closed down and 
have never reopened their mills. Manu- 
facturers, wishing to keen abreast with 
the times, started wire nail plants on 
the Pacific Coast. and at the present 
time there are two at Oakland, one in 
San Francisco, and one being started 
in Vancouver. B.C. 

The advantage of wire nails became 
so apparent that the engineer, architect 
and carpenter were quick to adopt 
them, and thev have come into such 
sreneral use that the term "nail" is ac- 
cepted as meaning- wire nail. Tt was 



generally admitted that the article 
designated "Smooth Wire Nail" by the 
trade, was more economical than the 
cut nail because there were a greatei 
nu m her of them to the pound, but a 
disadvantage lay in the fact that thev 
did not hold as well as the old-style 
cut nail. This naturally turned the 
American inventive genius to a consid 
eration of the subject, and many so- 
called improvements were adopted to 
increase the holding- power. Thev were 
barbed, made flat, triangular and other 
shapes, but none of these changes were 
effective, nor did thev come into "- en eral 
use. 

Later J. C. Pearson, of Roston, dis- 
covered a process of coating the ordin- 
ary nail with a compound which, in 
lieu of a short comprehensive name, he 
called "cement." This compound con- 
sisted largely of resin because of its 
holding power. 

Nails dinned in this compound were 
introduced by specialists who, strange 
to say, devoted most of their atten- 
tion to the making of boxes, and they 
met with great success. To-dav there 
is scnrcelv anv class of packing box on 
the Pacific Coast that is not fastened 
with one of these nails.' 

Railroad companies are using them 
largely to the exclusion of other nails 
and the Southern Pacific Company has 
used thousands of kegs of them in its 
building- and car works. 

These coated nails are now being car- 
ried by all the leading jobbing houses 
on the Pacific Coast, and they are gen- 
erally finding their way to the retail 
stores. As thev are sold at the same 
price ner keg - as the common wire nails, 
it is believed that they will supersede 
the latter and come into general use, 
which will mark a new epoch in the 
nail trade. 

A NEW USE FOR GLASS. 

Like reinforced concrete, reinforced 
glass is now more and more emploved 
in buildings. Reinforced gdass is made 
by rolliner two sheets of glass between 
which is placed a metallic grating. The 
product shows remarkable cohesion and 
tenacity; and, in case of breaking, the 
pieces of glass, instead of separating", 
remain adherent, held bv the metallic 
grating. That is the principal advant- 
age of reinforced class. Ry intersecting- 
experiments, recently made. MM. Schler- 
nitzauer and Crocket, of Paris, France, 
have proved that a plate of reinforced 
gdass, slig-htly less than a quarter of an 
inch thick, -and a trifle over four feet 
long bv a foot and a half wide, could 
sunnort a weight of about 1.047 pounds. 
Under 1,322 pounds it did not break, 
but was only bent and cracked. Rein- 
forced gdass has another important pro- 
perty : a small building', the walls of 
which are made of reinforced edass. re 
sists a verv lively fire lit on the inside: 
w-hereas an ordinary window breaks at 
the first touches of the flame. 

Such properties clearlv fit reinforced 
gdass for roofing-, shop-windows, and 
class partitions; but its application to 
the construction of staircases is par- 
ticularlv successful, for glass staircases 
allow the easv lierhtmer of the descents 
into the basements. Their steps are 
not slipperv. and. in case of fire, their 
superioritv over wooden staircases is 
; in-..ntestahle. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 



FIRST CONCRETE SKY SCRAPER 



Till: Ingalls building, Cincinnati, oc- 
cupies I lie entire area of a coiner 
lot 50x100 feet and is fifteen stor- 
ies and a full attic, practically sixteen 
stories, rising to a height of 210 feet 
above the sidewalk. One half of the 
basement is the usual twelve feet deep ; 
hut the other half, containing the power 
plant, is twenty feet deep. The founda- 
tions extend five feet below this, so that 
the entire height of the construction 
from bottom of foundations is 2;ir> feet, 
entirely concrete steel. The building is, 
in fact', a concrete box having eight inch 
walls, concrete floors and roof, concrete 
beams, concrete columns, concrete 
stairs ; the whole being entirely devoid 
of the usual I-beams, Z-bars, angle 
irons, plates, rivets, bolts, etc., having 



A brief description, therefore, may not 
be out of place at this point. In the 
first place, then, let it be understood 
that for structural purposes the concrete 
should be made of strictly high grade 
Portland cement, clean sand, containing 
if possible grains of variable size, and 
crushed stone or gravel. In superstruc- 
ture, limestone should not be used, as 
it would too readily be injured in a fire. 
Such concrete should be dense, that is 
to say, the voids should be well filled, 
and all thoroughly tamped. Enough 
water should be used to make a soft 
concrete, so as to insure perfect contact 
with the steel bars ; for concrete-steel, 
it must be remembered, depends for its 
strength chiefly upon the adhesion be- 
tween the concrete and the steel. The 



however, that the amount of steel used 
should be determined by actual calcula- 
tian, and not by guess work or rule of 
thumb as is apt to be the case. 

Walls, if used merely as curtain walls, 
may be as thin as three to four inches, 
or not more than six to eight inches, as 
may be required by the depth of the 
window box ; they should, however, be 
reinforced by a network of bars, placed 
not over three or four feet apart both 
vertically and horizontally, to prevent 
shrinkage cracks. 

In the Ingalls building, the Ransome 
system of cold twisted square bars was 
used throughout. This gives excellent 
results, due to the greatly increased ten- 
sile strength of the bars after twisting, 
and the mechanical grip of the twisted 
bar on the concrete. 

The floors are continuous slabs five 





Concrete Skyscraper in course of const 



The Ingalls Building completed. 



only bars imbedded in concrete, with 
the ends interlaced, making actually a 
complete concrete monolith of the en- 
tire building, covered on the exterior on- 
ly with a veneer from four to six inches 
thick of white marble for the lower 
three stories, glazed gray brick for the 
next eleven, and glazed white terra 
cotta for the top storey and cornice. 

The principles of concrete-steel are 
rapidly coming to be fairly well under- 
stood, especially so by the structural 
engineers, for, after all, it is primarily 
an engineering proposition. But without 
question, a large proportion of the pro- 
fession, and certainly the great major- 
ity of architects, have not as yet had 
actual experience in its use, and per- 
haps have not given the subject the 
serious consideration which it deserves. 



concrete itself is figured only in com- 
pression, never in tension, and wherever 
tension occurs, this is taken up by steel 
bars ; as for instance in the bottom of 
a beam or footing, or near the surface 
of a column where wind or other bend- 
ing stresses must be considered. The 
compression in columns is taken up 
chiefly by the concrete ; but where this 
is not sufficient, vertical steel bars are 
inserted, which, however, must be thor- 
oughly tied together to prevent spread- 
ing. Shearing stresses in beams and 
columns are taken up first by the con- 
crete, but this must be' reinforced by 
bars placed across the line of shear. 

Floors are preferably made in slabs of 
uniform thickness and reinforced near the 
underside with bars or steel mesh of 
various forms. It is of importance, 

58 



inches thick, reinforced with a mesh of 
three-quarter inch square twisted steel 
bars from eighteen to twenty inches on 
centres in both directions and strength- 
ened by a beam or rib across the centre 
of the column bay of sixteen by twenty 
inches, dividing this into two panels, 
each sixteen feet square, without any 
other supporting beams. 

The columns have stiffening bars 
placed on two opposite sides near the 
surface to take the wind strains. They 
are further reinforced near the centre by 
compression bars, which take up all 
such load as may be required in excess 
of the carrying capacity of the concrete 
alone. These bars not being in tension 
need not be twisted, and accordingly 
plain round bars were used of various 
sizes, according to location, from two 



January 13, 1906 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



Hardware and Metal 



and one-half to three and one-half inches 
in the basement, diminishing in numbers 
and sizes in succeeding stories until they 
were reduced to one inch and then en- 
tirely dispensed with at about the tenth 
floor, from which point on, the concrete 
was sufficient to do all the work. The 
. interior or compression bars had the 
ends milled off and were joined just 
above the floor level by a sleeve of 
steam pipe, a trifle larger than the bars 
and grouted with cement. They were 
then tied together firmly at three or 
four points in the height by small bars 
bent around them. The exterior or wind 
bars were joined in the centre of the 
storey height by splices, which consist- 
ed of several smaller bars wired about 
the joint. The column was further re- 
inforced by means of hoops of one quar- 
ter inch bars, placed around all the bars 
near the surface at intervals of from 
twelve to eighteen inches throughout 
the height. As stated before, these pre- 
vent the spreading of the bars and take 
up the excess of vertical shear. 

The question has been asked as to 
how the girders were connected to the 
columns. Very simply indeed, the girder 
bars merely extend in between the col- 
umn bars and the concrete of the one 
being monolithic with that of the other 
completes and perfects the connection, 
than which nothing could be more se- 
cure. 

The walls above the piers of the low- 
er two stories are eight inches thick 
and afford the best possible system of 
wind bracing, inasmuch as the entire 
mass between the head of one window 
and the sill of the one next above is 
figured as a beam with rods top and 
bottom. 

The method of supporting the exterior 
facing of marble, brick, or terra cotta, 
as the case may be, is as simple as it is 
effective. 

In case of the marble work or granite, 
if such be used, for the lower stories, a 
concrete ledge or corbel is formed 
around the piers just below the side- 
walk level, and these afford the neces- 
sary foundation for such face work. 

In case of the face brick above, the 
various floor slabs are merely extended 
out beyond the wall three inches ; this 
forms a ledge for the support of the 
brick facing, each storey being indepen- 
dent of the other, and is afterward cov- 
ered with a one-inch tile, or whatever 
may be desired. 

All face work, however, is securely an- 
chored by means of round wrought iron 
bars which are built into the concrete by 
boring holes of proper size through the 
wood forms and inserting the anchors, 
which are perfectly straight at the 
time, but are afterward bent to suit ; 
they must be straight so that the form- 
work can be drawn over them upon be- 
ing removed when the concrete has suf- 
ficiently set. 

In case of the cornice, which is of 
terra cotta, the roof slab was simply 
projected out as a cantilever to the re- 
quired distance, which in this case was 
five feet. Sleeves of sheet iron were in- 
serted at proper points and remained 
built into the concrete, and bolts to se- 
cure the terra cotta were afterward in- 
serted through them and grouted in 
place. 

In a brief sketch like this, it would be 
impossible to describe the many points 
of advantage peculiar to this method of 
construction. There are many, and it 
might suffice to say that numerous new 
problems were encountered, and while 



BEST ELBOWS 

FOR 

CONDUCTOR 
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BEAR 
TRADE MARK 





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from 

ICE PRESSURE 



Made in . . . 

6 Materials. 
5 Angles. 
14 Sizes. 
1,225 Varieties. 




For Sale by the TRADE 

in Canada. Write for 

catalogue and 

samples to 

Ferdinand Dieckmann 

1180-82-84 HAERISON AVE. 

CINCINNATI, 0., U.S.A. 



Start Right 

Now is the time, with 
stock-taking over, to make 
your plans for a record- 
breaking season's trade for 
1906. 

You can make money 
selling heating goods, but 
you must start right — you 
must have the right agency 
and you may safely follow 
the lead of hundreds of the 
wisest and most successful 
dealers in the trade in 
Canada, by basing your 
season's prospects on the 



Pease 
Economy 



line of heating goods. 

They will cover the 
whole range of your needs 
— save you endless worry 
and annoyance, build up 
your heating business on a 
firm and enduring founda- 
tion and, besides, will make 
substantial profits for you. 

Better Write To-day. 



Pease Foundry'Co., Limited 

TORONTO 

Pease-Waldon Co., 

WINNIPEG 



59 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



January 13, 1906 



tlu-v were all solved in a satisfat 
manner, it must be remembered that 
tins is the first attempt to make a 

I application of the concrete-steel 
in to the sky-scraper problem, and 
it has apparently been eminently 
satisfactory, it is not claimed to be fin- 
al in ^11 respects, and there will un- 
doubtedly be marked improvements here 
and there as the system develops. 

During the progress of the work on 
the Ingalls building, wise ones among 
men ol great ability, who should have 
known better, predicted that the struc- 
ture would never reach the roof and 
that, even if it did, it would certainly 
crack all to pieces by shrinkage and 
that it could not possibly withstand 
wind pressure. The facts are that it did 
reach the roof; that there are no 
shrinkage cracks and that the building 
not only lias not been blown over, but 
that in" the highest winds there is not 
even a perceptible tremor, and that too 
with concrete walls only eight inches 
thick from bottom to top, and the floors 
but five inches thick in unbroken slabs 
sixteen feet square, a portion of which 
on the second floor carries a bank vault 
weighing nearly a hundred tons. Such 
and other equallv absurd arguments 
have fallen to the ground.— Valve World. 



BUSINESS CHANGES. 
Ontario. 
K tauter & Ritchie, hardware and tin- 
smiths. Ethel, were burnt out, 

J R. Reeves, plumber, Toronto, has 
assigned to E. R. C. Clarkson. 

('dim Wesley cV Son, hardware mer- 
chants, Aylmer, Ont., are advertising 
their business for sale. 

H W. Denves, hardware merchant, 
Garleton Place, stock, etc., advertised 
for sale. Assets to be sold by tender 
17th inst. 

Quebec. 

Watts & Mailhot, hardware merchants, 
Montreal, are dissolving partnership. 

Western Canada. 

R. P. Allen, hardware merchant, Min- 
to, has sold out. 

Geo. Mcintosh, hardware merchant, 
Osier, has sold out to Peter Woelk. 

Ileslip, Kellv & Young, hardware mer- 
chants, High River, Alta., burnt out. 

A. Fountain, agricultural implements, 
Douglass, Man., has been succeeded by 
D. Caradice. 

George B. Hughes, lumber and hard- 
ware dealer, Teulon, Man., has sold out 
to W. I). Gillespie. 

W. & J. Stewart, hardware mer- 
chants, Plum Coulee. Man., have sold 
their Winkler branch. 

MatRonald cV Fleming, hardware mer- 
chants, Winnipeg, have sold their Maui 
.el branch to S. Drewe. 



EXTENSION TO ANGUS SHOPS. 
The C.P.R. Angus Locomotive & Car 

Shops, already the largest of their kind 
on the contingent, are continually being 
enlarged, and the railway officials now 
find it necessary to provide addit 
car shop accommodation. Two exten- 
sions are to be built, each 100 feet by 
072 feet, costing in the neighborhood of 
a quarter of a million dollars. Tt is 
expected that other additions will also 
have to be mad'' shortly. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 

Advertisement* under this heading, 2c. a word Brsl 
insertion : lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but live figures (a 
$1,000) .ire allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can tins rule be overlooked. 
Advertisements received without remittance cannot be 
aekiuus tedged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, live 
cents must be added to eost to eover postage, . t< 

SITUATIONS WANTED. 

ENGLISHMAN, exceptional Canadian and 
British experience ; capable reliable worker ; 
hardware office or store; used to managing work- 
ing business. Palmer, 122 McGill, Toronto. 
Ontario. [5 22 ] 

BY experienced hardware salesman, either as 
salesman or traveler for hardware specialties, 
paints oro Is; energetic salesman ; good references. 
Box 237 Hardware and Metal. [3] 



YOUNG man with eleven vpars practical 
experience in hardware business desires 
position fs traveler; Ai references. Box 25c, 
Hardware and Metal [3] 

TRAVELLING sale-man wanted to handle a 
well-known line of stoves and hot air furnaces 
in Ontario; state experience. Box cot, Hard- 
ware and Metal. [2] 

SUPERINTENDENT WANTED. 

FIRST-CLASS man to take full management of 
Furnace and Stove plant ; would prefer if he 
wo\t1d take a financial interest in ihe business, 
which will bear the closest of investigation. Ad- 
dress Room "C" Confederation Life Rnildine. 
Toronto. [52-?l 

FOR SALE. 

HARDW 'RE business in good town, surrounded 
bv best filming country in Canada. St^ck 
$5.00; turn-over $2%, rooperannum. Good profits. 
Reason for selling, dissolution nf partnership. 
Address Box 139, HARDWARE AND METAL. [4]' 

HARDWARE business, thriving town in Western 
Ontario. Wiite at once; Box 483, E c sex, 
Ont. [2] 

PART set of tinsmith tools in good shape; will 
sell cheap. Apply to Box 500, HARDWARE 
and Metal. |>] 

F OR SALE 

GROWING hardware and furniture business in 
1 o-a-head Western Manitoba town ; invest- 
ment of slightly over three thousand, less than 
three years ago, will show at the end of tlrrd vear 
surplus about twelve thousand ; owner retiring ; 
this will soon go. Apply quick to Box 236, 
Hardware and Metal 

SITUATIONS VACANT. 



LAFARGE (A) CEMENT 

for setting, pointing and backing 
Limestone, Granite or Marble where 
freedom from discoloration is desired. 
Send for descriptive catalogue. 

Drain Pipes, Sewer Bricks, 

Fire Bricks, Building Bricks, 
Portland Cement, 

Road Paving Bricks and Blocks 

F. HYDE & CO. 

KINO, QUEEN and WELLINGTON STS. 

MONTREAL 

STREET PAVINO and SIDEWALK S a SPECIALTY 

SILICA BARYTIG STONE GO. 

OF ONTARIO Limited 



w 



ANTED tinsmith, good all-aro'-nd man. 
Yearly job. • Must be temperate. Single 
man preferred. State wages and experier.ee. 
Porteous Br<-s., Carlyle, Sask. [4] 

ll/ANTED, catalogue man, who has had 
" ' previous expeience on complete hardware 
catalogue work: state salary required ; only those 
with a thorough knowledge of hardware need 
apply. Box R. W. J., Hardware and Metal, 
Montreal. , [2] 



STOVE MANUFACTURERS 

IF you intend opening up a branch in Canada 
for the manufacture of stoves, it will be to your 
interest to communicate with A. B., Room C, 
Confederation Life Building. Toronto. tS 22 ] 

60 



Wat-r Proof Floors tor 
Malt Houses, Brewer- 
ies, Slaughter Houses, 
Cheese Factories, Cel- 
lar, Stable Floors, etc- 



Head Office : 

Ingersoll, Ontario. 

Walter Mills.General Manager 
Ask for quotations for 
Septic Tanks. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 
Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works 

"Machinery " Newport NfwpORT. MoN. . F.NGL'Nn 



:) Covert Mfg. Go. 

TROY, N.Y. 




Harness Snaps. Chain, 
Rope and Web Goods, 
etc. For sale by Jobbers 
°»»™ 3 * at Manufacturers' prices. 

302 




USE 

"HERCUL 



5" BRAND 
PORTLAND CEMENT 



Manufactured by 

THE GREY & BRUCE PORTLAND CEMENT CO. 

OWEN SOUND 

J. McLAUCHLAN, President. 

>..#..#..»..•..•.••"••••••••*•••••••■••"••••••••••"••••"•■•••• 

THE IMPERIAL CEMENT CO., Limited j 

Makers of the Celebrated Brand 

"IMPERIAL" PRTLAND CEMENT j 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. j 

...FULL STOCK... 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



IweSwe 



« 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

THE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON, OUT. TORONTO. ONT 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



January 13, 1906 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



Hardware and Metal 



ki 



DOMINION BRAND 



» 



" w. 



ROOFING MATERIALS ARE 
THE BEST FOR YOU 

BECAUSE they are ihe most durable and in every way the most satisfactory. 
BECAUSE their quality remains long after the price is forgotten. 
BECAUSE they are the easiest to sell. You know what that means. 
Write if you can't call 




TARRED 



LOCKERBY & McCOMB,« s *hann.„st., Montreal 



SELLING GOODS FOR PROFIT 

is the ambition of all dealers, but where is the profit if not careful to select goods that sell ? CHURCH'S 

ALABASTINE 

is in demand all the time because it fills the bill exactly for wall tinting and decorating on old walls and new. 
Our up-to-date methods of advertising help to create and increase the demand. ALABASTINE once used, 
always used, because results are right. 

ALABASTINE is put up in five-pound packages, twenty tints and white. Deep shades and white are also 
put up in 2 }4 -pound packages. ♦ 

ALABASTINE is a durable wall-coating. Hardens with age. Sells easily and affords good profit. Dealers, 
write us for prices. Order from jobbers or direct from 



THE ALABASTINE CO., Limited, 



Paris, Ont. 



Choosing Cylinder Locks 

j. An Eye to Price. 

True, price is not the factor with you that it is with the final buyer, but, then if you buy 
high-priced locks simply because you think foreign-made goods must be better, don't you 
see you lessen your chances for sales ? 

Even if foreign- made locks were superior to 

GURNEY CYLINDER LOCKS 

the price of the latter would be in their favor. But the truth is, that Gurney Cylinder Locks 
are not only cheaper, but they are better than most other locks. 

You cannot get a better quotation than we can give, and you cannot get cylinder locks 
better suited for the trade than Curney Cylinder Locks. 

We have published a Catalogue and also Supplements to it. These will give you full 
particulars about the locks, and our numerous designs in artistic trimmings. Send for them. 

THE GURNEY, TILDEN CO., LIMITED 



BRANCHES: 
WINNIPEG ^Tilden, Gurney & Co., Limited 
VANCOUVER-The Gurney, Tilden Co., Limited 



HAMILTON 



AGENCY: 



Montreal, P. Q., Charles Nicoll, 

85 St. Peter St. 



61 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND S T E A M F I T T I N G 



January 13, 1906 



MANUFACTURERS OF 




MADE IN CANADA." 



Write us at once if you want to secure- 



A CATALOGUE 

of the' latest designs of Porcelain Enamelled Bath Tubs 
Sink*, Urinals, Latrines Etc. 

Now ready for distribution and will be mailed on application. 

THE ONLY MANUFACTURERS OF ENAMELLED WARE IN CANADA 



Head Office and Factory : 

Port Hope, Out. 



Sales Office: 

So Colborne St., Toronto. 



M 1 




HICH-CRADE 



PLUMBING GOODS 

and Supplies 



The JAMES MORRISON BRASS MFG. GO. 




RETURNED 

JAN 1* ?qoj' 



TORONTO 



Limited 



The "Astoria" — A high-grade closet combination 
with latest sanitary improvements. 



62 



January 13, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 




THE GAS PRODUCER FOR HEATING PROCESSES. 



The early discussions, in England and 
Europe, of producer gas or "poor" gas, 
A, as it was called, awakened but little in- 
terest in this country. Our coal supply 
was generous, and the price of fuel com- 
paratively low ; moreover, just at that 
time the great possibilities of natural 
gas were discovered, and aroused so 
much enthusiastic interest that little 
thought was given to any other form of 
fuel. Gas producers were looked upon by 
American manufacturers as unnecessary 
and of questionable economy. More than 
that, the producers themselves were de- 
signed in such small sizes that the 
American, using only large units in his 
processes, failed to recognize the possi- 
bilities of the new gas. 

Nature was so prodigal of her gifts in 
this country, that men saw at first no 
need of economy in their use. In time, 
however, it became apparent that the 
supply of natural gas was not unlimited, 
but that, at the rate it was being used, 
the end would eventually be reached. 

The advantages of a gas fuel had by 
this time been learned ; its cleanliness, 
its controllability, its power, and its 
economy. Manufacturers not in the nat- 
ural gas region had begun to ask if any 
form of gaseous fuel could be found, 
which would enable them to meet the 
competition of cheap natural gas ; and 
when it was seen that the failing nat- 
ural gas supply might compel a return 
to coal and wood as the only means of 
producing heat, the attitude of America 
toward the gas producer was entirely 
changed. 

Finding here a subject worthy of their 
attention, American engineers thorough- 
ly investigated English and European 
methods, and then began experimenting 
to see if they could devise a producer 
that would meet the needs of the Ameri- 
can manufacturer. Instead of devoting 
their energies to improving the details 
of small producers, as was being done on 
the continent, they turned their atten- 
tion to devising producers of increased 
capacity, and with an automatic feed de- 
vice which would allow the producer to 
be run both continuously and uniformly. 
These eflorta resulted in the development 
of producers of larger capacities than 
had been thought possible. Other im- 
provements have been added, until at 
least one American gas producer has 
readied such a high state of efficiency 
that not only are American manufactur- 
ers becoming aroused to its merits, but 
numerous European firms are ordering it 
in preference to the cheaper producers 
made at home. 

Prejudice Against Gas Machines. 

In many localities a prejudice exists 
against the gas producer, due to the 
failure of some particular make, design- 
ed and put upon the market by a boiler 
maker or machinist lacking the neces- 
sary engineering knowledge and exper- 
ience. It is a mistake, however, to re- 



fuse to investigate this subject because 
of the blunders of some. The designing 
of a gas producer, and the adaptation of 
producer gas to various heating opera- 
tions, are problems which so far have 
only been successfully accomplished by 
engineering companies having wide ex- 
perience in many forms of heating opera- 
tions. The manufacture and installation 
of gas producers is a business which, 
like the steam turbine or other great in- 
novations, requires much special know- 
ledge, and during its infancy must neces- 
sarily be limited to those having special 
facilities for obtaining the necessary ex- 
perience. 

The best type of American gas pro- 
ducer may be briefly described as fol- 
lows : 

An upright cylindrical steel shell, 10 
to 14 feet in diameter, and of about the 




Gas Producer for Heating Purposes. 

same height, slightly tapering at the 
base, lined with firebrick. In this is kept 
a bed of ashes at the bottom, two or 
three feet deep, and above a layer of 
partially burned coal of about the same 
depth. A forced draft of air and steam 
of the proper proportion is admitted in- 
to the bottom of the producer through 
a large spreader or hood and passes up 
through the ashes and incandescent coal 
or carbon, with which it unites to form 
producer gas, which is led out through 
a large' firebrick-lined nozzle near the 
top of the producer to the flue leading 
to the furnace, where the gas is to be 
burned. There is no grate to this pro- 
ducer, the ashes being held in a large 
basin of water, which forms an effectual 
seal, preventing the generated gases from 
escaping. A steam blower creates an 
artificial draft for burning the coal, and 
at the same time sends in enough steam 
to enrich the gas, keep down the tem- 

63 



perature of the fire, "and soften the clink- 
ers. The quantity of gas made is ac- 
curately controlled by the amount of 
steam turned on the blower. 

On top of the producer is located a 
water-sealed automatic feed, for spread- 
ing the coal evenly and regularly over 
the entire burning area. Upon the con- 
tinuous and accurate operation of this 
feed a large measure of the success of 
the producer depends. 

It is obvious that if the fuel bed can 
always be kept in the same condition as 
regards temperature, depth and density, 
the gas produced will be constantly uni- 
form. The paramount factors in main- 
taining uniform conditions in the fuel 
bed are first, the constant and even 
feeding in and spreading of the coal , 
second, the constant and even agitation 
of the fuel and ash bed ; third, the con- 
stant and even removal of the ashes , 
and fourth, the even blowing of the en- 
tire fuel bed. 

The quality of the gas, the perfection 
of the producer, and the economy of its 
operation depend almost entirely upon 
the degree of efficiency attained in these 
four operations. 

Much Experimenting Done. 

With this end in view three at least of 
our leading manufacturers are spending 
considerable money in extensive experi- 
menting. One of them is now offering a 
producer that, it is claimed, will per- 
form all of these vital operations auto- 
matically and hence with a degree of 
perfection quite beyond anything hereto- 
fore obtained. In the ordinary old type 
of producer, the coal is hand fed and 
hand spread (if spread at all), the fuel 
and ash beds are hand poked every few 
hours (depending upon the faithfulness of 
the operator), the ashes are removed 
every 24 to 3b' hours, and the blower- 
hood is so designed as to make an even 
distribution of air throughout the pro- 
ducer impossible. 

With our best producers, however, even 
though they are but partially automatic, 
great economies in numerous industries 
have been effected— the fuel bill often be- 
ing cut down one-half and the capacity 
increased one-third. 

How are such economies possible ? 

In the first place, in direct firing with 
solid fuel, combustion is always imper- 
fect, often over fifty per cent, of the 
energy of the coal passing up the chim- 
ney in the form of incompletely burned 
gas and heat to create the necessary 
draft. Accompanying this is the indraw- 
ing of a large excess of cold air through 
the grates, "to make the fire burn." 
Then there is a waste of coal through 
the grates with the ashes ; the loss by 
radiation is very large, and finally, in 
applying the heat, it is usually impossi- 
ble to distribute it to the exact places 
where required. 

In the second place, the labor neces- 
sary for handling the coal at the various 
furnaces is a costly item. 

In the third place, a direct coal fire is 
difficult to control ; at times more heat 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



will be produced than can be utilized, 
while at other times the heat will fall 
far short of the required amount. 

Finalb whenever a plant is shut 

down, whether every night, only [or an 

hour, or lor a day or two. there is al- 

a great waste in banking the fires 

and firing up again. 

Contrast tins with the conditions when 
a modern gas producer is used. 

Advantages Enumerated. 

In the last place, in a properly ar- 
ranged gas furnace there is perfect com- 
bustion, so that small allowance need be 
made for loss of fuel value. This is a 
noteworthy fact, and calls for emphasis. 
All the coal put into a good gas pro- 
ducer is wholly converted into gas and 
ashes, so that all available heat in the 
coal is utilized, except a small radia- 
tion loss. .Moreover, the air used for 
combustion is not cold, but is already 
raised to a high temperature by means 
of legenerators, which thus conserve 
nearh all of tiie otherwise wasted heat 
of the furnaces. In the case of melting 
furnaces, this feature alone means a 
saving of 50 per cent. There is, then, 
DO loss of coal through the grates, and 
tne heat lost by radiation from the pro- 
ducer and Hues is a very small item. 
Moreover, the heal from the burning gas 
may be applied at the very point where 
needed. 

In the second place, the coal is all re- 
ceived and handled at one point, thus 
greatly reducing the labor bill. 

In the third place, a producer-gas fire 
is ahvavs under perfect control, allowing 
accurate regulation of the heat to meet 
the changing requirements of the furnace. 

Finally, it the plant is shut down over- 
night, or even over Sunday, there is 
practically no loss. It takiy but a few 
minutes to get up the required amount 
of heat, even when the producer has been 
idle for two or three days. 

But what are some of the figures gain- 
ed by actual working experience ? 

In rolling mills with direct firing, 
about 300 pounds of coal per gross ton 
of finished product are required in the 
heating furnaces ; with producer gas, on- 
ly 122 to 150 pounds are needed. 

in melting glass under the old method, 
one pound of coal was required for each 
pound of glass ; with producer gas, the 
same results are obtained with one-half 
pound of coal per pound of glass. 

Saving of Fuel. 

Formerly, in steel works one ton of 
coal was consumed in melting one ton of 
iron, and 1,500 pounds of coal per ton 
of iron are still required with direct 
coal firing. Willi producer gas, but 600 
00 pounds cif coal per ton of iron are 
needed. 

But fuel economy is not the only ad- 
vantage to be derived from producer gas. 
Its use often greatly increases the out- 
put of a given plant, and provides facili- 
ties for accomplishing results that would 
be impossible with solid fuel. 

A producer has recently been installed 
for lime burning, resulting in an increas- 
ed capacity oi 30 per cent, and a de- 
crease in the cost of fuel of '18 per rent. 

The comparison of producer gas with 
other forms of fuel is easily made. 

In the manufacture of illuminating gas 
a large amount ol waste is unavoidable, 
and it is necessary to make a certain 
proportion of by-product, or oil must be 
used for enrichment. This practically 
puts illuminating gas entirely out of 
consideration. 



In the limited regions where natural 

l;.is is very cheap— say, 5 1 to tiA cents 
per 1,000 feet— coal must lie low in price 
lo SI per ton— in order that pro- 
ducer gas may successfully compete with 
natural gas. Hut since slack coal can be 
used advantageously in the host pin 
ducers, it is not an impossible proposi- 
tion even in the natural gas regions. 

If oil and producer gas could he fired 
with equal economy, then oil at one cent 

a gallon would he as cheap a fuel as 
producer gas made from coal at $1 per 
ton ; at $2 per ton for coal, the value 
of oil would he 1.7 cents per gallon. But 
oil, as a rule, cannot he fired with more 
than one-half the economy of producer 
gas . hence, producer gas made from coal 
at $2 per ton would he as economical as 
oil at one cent per gallon. The present 
price of fuel oil in the neighborhood of ' 
New York city is trom 3 cents to 5 
ciMi Is per gallon. 

From these figures the manufacturer 
can easily decide which fuel would be 
most economical for him in his locality. 

Capable of Varied Uses. 

The following is but a partial list of 
the many lines of business to which pro- 
ducer gas is being adapted with marked 
economy, and usually with largely in- 
creased capacities ; Heating iron and 
steel in rolling mills and steel works of 
all descriptions ; smelting and refining 
zinc, lead, copper, and all metalliferous 
ores ; manufacturing lime, sewer pipe, 
pottery, brick, etc. ; in chemical works, 
for heating the retorts, stills, roasting 
floors, boiling kettles and evaporating 
pans ; in enameling and japanning ovens, 
paint works, etc. ; for heating and weld- 
ing in locomotive works, boiler works, 
pipe mills, variety iron works, and rail- 
road repair shops ; in brass and copper- 
mills, plate mills, malleable iron works; 
in spring works ; in ore roasting and the 
manufacture of phosphates, soda ash, 
carbons, etc. ; in sugar refineries, ship- 
building establishments, the manufacture 
of carriages, and the making of gkiss. 

From a position of relative unimpor- 
tance, the gas producer is thus being 
brought to a high state of efficiency, ami 
shows itself to be of such value in so 
many lines of manufacture that it would 
be hard to find a subject of wider or 
more practical interest. 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES IN AFRICA 

Africa, both north and south, is an 
important customer for electrical sup- 
plies of every description, and although 
the British firms have been capturing 
the majority of contracts, United States 
manufacturers intend to go after a 
larger share of the trade by t lie prosecu- 
tion of an energetic campaign and by 
having competent and forcible men in 
the field. American trade has been fall- 
ing off in 1905, the last month reported 
being May, in which there was a de- 
crease in the shipments of electrical ma- 
chinery from the corresponding month in 
1001 of $2,800. 

The great activity in the electrical 
trade is not by any means confined to 
South Africa, for in Egypt and other 
northern provinces large electrical prob- 
lems are under consideration. As, for 
instance, the Soudan Government is con-' 
sidering the introduction of an extensive. 
electric tramway system into Khar- 
toum. Neither cables nor overhead wires 
will he used, the intention being to 
store i be electric power in the cars. It 

04 



is expected that the system will be ex 
tended to Omdurman. Public and private 
installations of electric light on an ex- 
tensive scale, electrical power, etc.. are 
under consideration, and for years to 
come Egypl s trade will run up into the 
millions. As the British are in cpnfrrol 
in Egypl they look upon that field as 
p. u t of their empire. American manu- 
facturers consider, however, that as 
the] have captured the mining rrnachiherj 
trade on the Hand they can do likewise 
in the electrical held. 

ELLIS ADJUSTABLE "S" WRENCH 

Patterson, Gottfried & Hunter, 1 46- 
150 Centre street, New York, have re- 
cently put on the market the Ellis ad- 
justable offset "S" wrench here illus- 




Fig. 1.— Ellis Adjustable Ofi'sct S Wrench. 

trated. Fig. 1 represents the wrench 
with jaws offset to the left. This is 
accomplished by means of a small 
round head spring- pin which, pulled 
slightly toward the person, allows the 
jaws portion to be swung to right, cen- 
tre or left, releasing the pressure on 
pin, causing it to catch in either of the 
three perpendicular square notches 
shown. Fig. 2 illustrates the same 
wrench with pipe jaw inserted, thus 
making the tool quickly interchangeable 
from a nut wrench to a pipe wrench, a 
valuable feature in a portable kit and 
for automobiling, etc. The importance 
of this wrench is its adaptability for 
working around corners, behind pipes, 
and in many otherwise difficult and in- 




FlG. 2. — Wrench with Pipe Jaw Inserted. 

accessible places. There are four sizes, 
and the jaw openings are operated by 
the milled edge barrel screw, the jaw 
capacity being the same standard as in 
regular wrenches, size for size. The 6 
and 8 inch sizes are nickel plated. The 
8, 12 and 18 inch sizes have a pistol 
finish. This style of wrench can be 
supplied in all sizes named, with either 
plain or pipe jaw, and in 6, 8 and 12 
inch sizes with both plain and pipe 
jaws. All pipe jaws are pistol finished. 
Mention Hardware and Metal in any 
communications to this firm. 



Why not make more of an effort on 
gymnasium goods and home exercisers'? 
There are many of these devices that 
should sell in every town. If there is 
no gymnasium sell exercisers to indi- 
viduals or boxing gloves to some of the 
young "sports" and striking bags te 
others 

* * 
* 

No man ever lost anything by honesty 
—honesty in the goods lie sells and hon- 
esty in talking them. 



January 13, 1906 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



TRUE BILLS AGAINST PLUMBERS 



The grand jury for the Assize Court 
now sitting 1 in Toronto, and presided 
over by Chancellor Boyd, on Tuesday 
took up the hearing of the cases of 
plumbers committed for trial on vari- 
ous charges. There were a larg-e num- 
ber of members of the different branches 
of the trade present, and much specula- 
tion was indulged in as to what the re- 
sults of the present trials would be. 
.Judge Boyd, in his address to the 
grand jury, referred to the plumbers' 
case, and the charge of conspiracy was 
-i fully explained. There are three groups 
— the supply men, plumbers and em- 
ployes. Justfce Clute has made a care- 
ful investigation, and laid down the law 
in one case. If it was found that there 
had been a combine to stifle competi- 
tion and raise prices, a true bill should 
be found. Where plumbing was neces- 
sary to keep you warm in Winter or 
from being parched in Summer, these 
men are charged with raising the prices 
and making you pay. 

Two Bonus Cases Decided. 

First on the programme were the 
charges of fraud laid against master 
plumbers who received bonuses on con- 
tracts which were awarded to others. 
In each case the jury returned true bills 
and the accused, therefore, go on to the 
court for trial. 

One case was against William J. Mc- 
Guire, George F. McGuire, George 
Clapperton, Joseph Wright, Henry Ho- 
garth, Alexander Purdy, Watson Mash- 
inter, and David Menzies. The charge 
of conspiracy against them includes, be- 
sides an alleged attempt to restrain 
trade and manufacture of plumbers' 
supplies, a conspiracy to defraud the 
Toronto Bedding Company of the sum 
of $400. 

The other true bill is against George 
F. McGuire, William J. McGuire, Alex- 
ander Purdy, James B. Fitzsimons, 
Kenneth J. Allison, Watson Mashinter, 
Henry B. Hogarth, Charles Robertson, 
Francis R. Maxwell, Herbert Johnson, 
George Wallis, James Fiddes. George 
Clapperton, and Joseph Wright. Be- 
sides the general charge of conspiracy, 
there is an additional charge of con- 
spiracy to defraud Messrs. Warwick 
Bros. & Rutter of the sum of $1,200. 

The Reeves Case. 

On Wednesday the grand jury returned 
true bills against W. J. Storey, Wil- 
liam Bush, F. J. Lawlor, Charles 
Corner, Charles H. Beavis, K. J. Alli- 
son, Lewis Legrow and W. J. Mason, 
charged with conspiracy to injure John 
B. Reeves and hindering his workmen 
and employes, and enticing the work- 
men from his service. They are also 
charged with restraining trade, by con- 
spiring- with Fred Armstrong, P. J. 
Hayes, and R. W. Harrison. 

Other True Bills Found. 

Another true bill charges W. J. Stev- 
enson, A. Malcolm, George Clapperton, 
Joseph Wright, Alexander Purdy, II. 
Mahonev and R. Mahoney with conspir- 
ing and defrauding- the Homewood San- 
itarium of Guelph of $800 on work 
done. 

True bills were also brought in 
against 22 plumbers on the charge of 
conspiracy, upon which they were sent 
for trial by Magistrate Denison, the 



cases against the 120 being taken up by 
the grand jury in batches of about hall 
a dozen at a time. 

None of the cases are to come up for 
trial before the grand jury has a chance 
to hear all the plumbers' cases before 
the court. It is probable that all those 
committed will have true bills found 
against them, and the real trials of the 
different cases will be taken up on Mon- 
day. 

Reeves an Absconder. 

An incident that will have an impor- 
tant bearing on the cases to come be- 
fore Judg-e Boyd is the absconding of 
J. B. Reeves, the man who made the 
original charges which brought down 
the house of cards around the heads of 
journeymen, master plumbers, and sup- 
ply men. The history of Reeves' con- 
nection with the plumbing business in 
Toronto has been disastrous to all with 
whom he has come in contact, but 
his final exit from the scene of his ac- 
tivities should be a benefit to the trade 
in g-eneral, not only because of trade 
reasons but because of the effect it will 
have on the cases now before the court. 
He having become an absconder, the 
question naturally arises as to whether 
the evidence given by him in helping to 
convict plumbers can be relied upon. 

Supply Men Hit Hard. 

Reeves was originally a member of 
the plumbers' union, acting as treasurer 
of that bodv. A couple of years ago 
he told a story of burglars making off 
with all the union money in his posses- 
sion, but he settled with the union by 
giving notes for the deficit, some of 
which he has paid. He soon branched 
out as a master plumber, and remained 
a member of the Master Plumbers' As- 
sociation until last Summer, and after 
drawing - out he commenced paying union 
men 50 cents per hour, while at the 
same time cutting prices awav down in 
order to get jobs in competition with 
other master plumbers. This had its 
natural result. No business man can 
continue to pav his bills if he does not 
do business at a profit. The finale 
shows him to have left the citv owing 
the Ontario Lead & Wire Company 
$931, and other supply houses smaller 
amounts. The Ontario Lead & Wire 
Company protected themselves by issu- 
ing a writ against him, this being- fol- 
lowed bv Reeves' assignment to E. R. 
C. CI ark son. 

Other Jobbers Losers. 

Reeves also conducted a bazaar, and 
the Nerlich Company are understood to 
be losers to the extent of over $1,200, 
and Robertson Brothers, candy manu- 
facturers, also have a large account un- 
paid. The stocks of both plumbing 
shop and bazaar are said to have been 
allowed to become depleted, Mr. Reeves 
evidently realizing everything he could 
before making his departure. 

How those people who propose to 
make Reeves the recipient of a public 
testimonial fund on account of his great 
nublic services will feel at his departure 
is uncertain. The Toronto Telegram 
has made itself rather ridiculous by an 
editorial exalting Reeves to the skies, 
but the plumbing trade generally will 
have no regrets at his departure from 
this district. 

65 



A PORTABLE WATER HEATER. 

A very simple portable water heater 
has recently been invented which is in- 
tended particularly for warming the wa-' 
tcr in a bathtub or basin. The heater 
is arranged in the form of a float which 
floats on the water and can thus he 
moved around to different parts of the 
tub as desired. Our illustration shows 
the device heating a basinful of water. 
It consists of a copper shell or bowl lit 
ted into a wooden ring. The latter af- 
fords sufficient buoyancy to float the de- 
vice. A gas burner is supported on the 
float and consists of a pipe bent to pro- 
ject into the copper shell. The open end 
of this pipe terminates near the bottom 




A Portable Water Heater. 

of the bowl. At its outer end the pipe 
is formed with a number of perforations 
which permit an inflow of air to increase 
the temperature of the flame. The quan- 
tity of air admitted is governed by a 
sleeve on the pipe, which may be moved 
to cover any desired number of holes. A 
flexible tube connects the burner with a 
gas fixture. The flame of the burner is 
directed against the bottom of tbe cop- 
per bowl, heating the thin shell to a 
high degree of temperature. To confine 
the heat within the bowl, several rings 
of coiled wire are placed within, as in- 
dicated in the engraving. These coils ef- 
fect a great saving of heat, so that the 
water surrounding the heater is raised 
to a high temperature at an economical 
consumption of gas. The value of this 
device will be particularly felt in Sum- 
mer time when the cooking is done ordi- 
narily on a small gas stove instead of a 
coal range, and it is consequently diffi- 
cult to obtain a supply of hot water. 
With this novel heater a basinful of hot 
water may be obtained in a few mo- 
ments and at short notice enough can be 
heated for the bath. A patent on this 
improved heater has just been procured 
by Mr. Charles M. Daly, of 538 West 
29 th street, New York city. 

SUBSTITUTE FOR PIPE WRENCH. 

A handy man wanted to remove the 
hot water front from his stove but as he 
had no pipe wrench was in a quandary, 
lie had a 12-inch monkey wrench, a cold 




Substitute for a Pipe Wrench. 

chisel and a flat file, however, and the 
sketch shows how the job was done. It 
took considerable power to move the 
pipes but the combination of tools did 
the work. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 13, 1906 




QUEBEC. 

Office of Hardware asp Metal. 
[oGUI Street, 

.Inuuaiy 12. 1906. 

Everything jusl now is very steady 
in the plumbing markets, and indications 
are that the many large jobs in pros- 
pect will create a large demand for 1.906, 
which will compare very favorably with 
that of last year, if not surpass it. 

Prices arc the same as last reported, 
but there is an impression among the 
supply houses that iron pipe will very 
soon be advanced again. In the mean- 
time prices before quoted remain ex- 
ceptionally firm. 

Range Boilers— Orders are fairly large 
and are coming In as well as can be ex- 
pected i bi the season. We are quoting: 
Iron clad, 30 gallon, $6.00, and 40 gal- 
lon, $7.50 net; copper, 30 gallon, $22.00; 
35 gallon, $24.00; 40 gallon, $28. Tbe 
discount on copper boilers is 15 per cent. 

Lead Pipe — Conditions of the market 
indicate a long continued period of 
strength and tbe advance recently made 
i- being steadily maintained. We 
give tbe following discounts: 20 
per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto 
St. John, N.B., and Halifax; f.o.b. Lon- 
don, 15c. per hundred lbs. extra; f.o.b. 
Hamilton, 10c. per hundred lbs. extra. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— A satisfactory 
output is reported by local supply bouses 
and quotations are unchanged, We 
give the following prices: Discounts 
on all sizes of nipples up to 6 inch, 67 
1-2 to 70 per cent. 

lion Pipe— There is a strong feeling 
that higher prices will be reached within 
the very near Future. In tbe meantime 
the market remains strong at 
the following prices : Standard 
pipe in lots of 100 feet, regular lengths, 
1-4 inch. $5.50; 3-8 inch, $5.50; 1-2 inch. 
I; 3-4 inch, $11.50; 1 inch, $16.50; 
1 1-4 inches. $22.50; 1 1-2 inches, 
$27.00; 2 inches, $36.00; discounts on 
black pipe, 1-4 inch, 62 per cent.; 3-8 
inch, 62 per cent.: 1-2 inch, 71 1-2 per 
cent.; 3-4 inch, and upwards, 73 1-2 per 
cent. Discounts on galvanized pipe: 1-4 
inch, 47 per cent.; 3-8 inch, 47 per 
cent.; 1-2 inch, 61 1-2 per cent.; 3-4 
inch and upwards, 63 1-2 per cent. Ex- 
tra heavy pipe of 100 feet lots arc 
quoted as follows: 1-2 inch, $12.00; 
3-4 inch. $15.00; 1 inch, $22.00; 1 1-4 
inch. $30.00; 1 1-2 inch. $36.00; 2 
inch. $50.00. The discount for black 
pipe is: 71 per cent., and for galvanized 
61 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings Business is 

exceptionally brisk just now. as 

naturally be expected, this being 

the i ff-season for these goods. Under 



the circumstances, however, trade is very 
satisfactory. Discounts are: Standard 
soil pipe, 50 per cent, off list. Standard 
fittings, 50 and 10 per cent, off list; 
medium and extra heavy soil pipe, 60 
per cent. off. Fittings, 60 per cent off. 

Solder— We are still quoting the fol- 
lowing priees: Bar solder, half-and- 
half, guaranteed, 22c: No. 2 (wiping 

solder). 18c. 



ONTARIO. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto January 12, 19' 6 

Advances on brass goods and closets 
are the feature of this week's report. In 
brass, compression and fuller work, val- 
ves and bath cocks have all been marked 
no as predicted in these columns in re- 
cenl reports. 

Likewise, our prediction of an in- 
crease on enamelware has come true, 
all lines of ettoset combinations hav- 
ing been advanced 50 cents. Importers 
of American enamel goods have also fol- 
lowed the recent advance in that mar- 
ket, and are now asking 10 per cent. 
more for these lines. The great strength 
of the iron market is responsible for tbe 
move irowarrl of enamel goods, and Can- 
adian manufacturers are said to be in- 
tending to make another advance. The 
Standard Tdeal Sanitary Co. have book- 
ed a large order for 20 carloads of 
enamelware for shipment to the west 
this Spring, and their factorv output is 
sold ahead for several months. 

Iron pipe is being sold by some firms 
at prices less than we quote, but there 
is considerable talk of another advance, 
and uni.forrr|ity will probably result. 

Lead Pipe -Market is strong, but 
there is no talk of a further advance 
Quotations continue: Lead. 7c; lead 
waste pipe, 8c. ; discount. 20 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Ntorma] biisi 
rvess is reported. Prices are firm. 
We quote as follows : Medium and 
extra heavy r>ir>p and fittinss, 60 per 
cent.: 7 and 8 inch pipe, 40 and 5 per 
rent. 

Iron Pipe— Some firms are talking of 
another advance on account of high 
price? of iron. There has been some 
shading of prices, however, and an ad- 
is likely to make onolations more 
even. We are quoting as fol- 

lows: Black. 1-1 inch: $2.0(1: 3-8. $2.09; 
1-2 inch, $2.45: 3-4 inch. $3.05: 1 inch, 
$4.37; 1 1-4 inch, $.",.0(1: 1 1-2 inch. 
$7.15: 2 inch. $0.54; 2 1-2 inch, $15.00; 3 
inch. $10.35: -alvanized. 1-1 inch. $2.91; 
3-fi inch. $2.01: 1-2 inch. $3.27: 3-4 
inch, $4.20; 1 inch. $6.02: 1 1-4 inch, 

66 



$8.22; 1 1-2 inch, $9.86; 2 inch, $13.14; 
2 1-2 inch, $21.45; 3 inch, $28.05. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Demand contn 
satisfactory, with prices unchanged. We 
quote the following prices: Cast iron, 
elbows, tees, crosses, etc., 65 per cent.; 
cast iron plugs and bushings, 65 per 
cent.; flange unions, 65 per cent.; nip- 
ples, 75 per cent.; iron cocks, 60 per 
cent.; Canadian malleable, 35 per cent.; 
American malleable, 25 per cent.: malle- 
able unions, 65 per cent.; malleable bush- 
ings and plugs, 60 per cent.; C. I. ceil- 
ing plates, plain or N. P., 70 per cent.; 
C. I. floor, 80 per cent.; bookplates, 60 
per cent.; expansion plates, 65 per cent.; 
headers or branch tees, 65 per cent.; ring 
hangers, b^ack or galvanized, 60 per 
cent., American list. 

Galvanized Iron Range Boilers— A 
good seasonable trade is being done. 
Trices continue firm, tbe cost of raw ma- 
terial being on the increase. We quote as 
follows: 12 gallon capacity, standard, 
$4.50; extra heavy, $6.50; 18 gallon, 
standard, $4.75; extra heavy, $6.75; 24 
gallons, standard, $4.75; extra heavy, 
$6.75; 30 gallon, standard, $4.75; extra 
heavy, $7.50; 35 gallon, standard, $5.75; 
extra heavy, $8.50; 40 gallon, standard, 
$6.75; 40 ' gallon, extra heavy, $9.50 ; 
52 gallon, $11.00; extra heavy, $14: 
66 gallon, standard, $18; extra heavy, 
$20; 82 gallon, standard, $21; extra 
heavy, $24; 100 gallon, standard, $29: 
extra heavy, $34; 120 gallon, standard. 
$34; extra heavy, $40; 144 gallon, stan- 
dard. $47; extra heavy, $55. The dis- 
count on copper and range boilers con- 
tinues at 15 per cent. 

Solder— The recent advances have not 
stopped buying at all and a. good trade 
is being (lone at steady prices. We 
now quote: Bar solder, half-and-half, 
guaranteed, 23c, and wiping at 20c. 

Enameled Ware— American enamel- 
ware has advanced 10 per cent, and all 
Canadian closet combinations have been 
marked up 50c. Frfrther advances of 
the Canadian product are talked of 
We are quoting as follows: Baths, 
rolled rim, 5 feet, 2 1-2 inch rim, first 
quality, $18.65; special, $16.65; 3 inch 
rim, first quality, $19.15; special, $18.15; 
5 1-2 feet, 2 1-2 inch rim, first quality, 
$20.15; special, $18.15; 3 inch rim, fh'st 
quality, $21.65; special, $19.65. Lava- 
tories, discounts, first quality, 30 to 30 
and 5 per cent.; special. 30 and 10 to 40 
per cent. Sinks, 18 x 30 inch, flat rim. 
first quality, $2.55: special, $2.40. 



Tenders are being called for by E. Al- 
lan, Arthur, for the heating of the Ar- 
thur high school by steam up to Jan- 
uary 22, the same to be placed during 
the Summer of 1906. 



F. R. talor, M.P., has laid before I he 
people a plan for municipal gas owner- 
ship. The franchise of the Dominion Gas 
Company ends this year, and the meet- 
ing was most enthusiastic in favor of 
the scheme. Mr. Lalor holds an option 
from a gas company to supply Dunnvillc 
with gas at ten cents per thousand, 
which he will turn over to the town. 



January 13, 1906 



PLUMBING AND ST E A M F I T T I N G 



Hardware and Metal 



,»..,..»..,..,..»..». .0..t..t..»..».,..»..»..»..»..»..t:9—-»-»-»-*-9-»:»-»-»..»-^~»:»..»..f J 



Ramsay's Paints for 1906 



OAMSAYSfAlHTs 



Let us talk to you about 
it. Many men make good 
money in Paints — Do you ? 

RAMSAY'S PAINTS 

demonstrate to you how 
they do it. 

It's easy to build on 
Ramsay's Paints. The price is right. 
The Paint is right. 

Don't push this aside. Think it up 
now. Would you like to see one of our 
salesmen ? 
You want Ramsay's Paints for 1906. 



A. RAMSAY & SON COMPANY 



Est. 1842 MONTREAL 

..•„•..•..••••..••■••••••• ■»..»..»..»..»..»*»..».. 



PAINT MAKERS 
■■•■••••••••.••..•..«. .»..\ 




"Solid- 
Adjustable " 

Die 
Machine 

Ask for 
Catalogue J. 



The " BORDEN " Machines are construct- 
ed entirely of Malleable Iron and Steel. 

H. E. HURRAY 

CANADIAN DEALER IN 

" THE BORDEN " 

Pipe Threading Machinery and "Solid-Adjustable" Dies 
16 Sheppard St., TORONTO, CAN. 



p^WWyi^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^AA^S A ^^^WWN w www w ww^^^^^S^^S^^^S^^^^S^^S^^^A^ 




USE 



UNITED 

TRIED and TESTED 

PLUMBERS' 



and your worries will 
cease 



Used by leading Plumbers 

Everywhere 



UNITED BRASS MF'G CO 

CLEVELAND, OHIO, U.S.A. 




67 



Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND ST E A M F I TT I N G 



January 13, 1906 



THAWING PUMPS. 

In cold climates it is quite often ne- 
.!>• to thaw out the pump before the 
■ hold custom of "filling the tea 
kettle" and starting breakfast prepara- 
tions can be inaugurated, and sometimes 
the ordinary household expedients in 
overcoming the difficulty fail to prove 
successful and the services of the plumber 
are called into requisition. In sueb in- 
stances. John W. Lane. Craftsbury. Yt.. 
lias used a device with satisfactory re- 
sults. As shown in the accompanying 
illustration, it consists of an ordinary 
gas lire pot with a galvanized iron can 
of larger or smaller size, according to 
the necessity of the case. The top of 
this can is provided with two outlets, 
both made from small pieces of galvan- 
ized iron pipe securely soldered into 
place. The one which stands vertically 
from the top of the can has a small 




For Thawing Pumps. 

globe valve on it just above a T ar- 
ranged to receive a small safety valve. 
Above the globe valve a small funnel is 
soldered. 

From the side of the boiler another 
small pipe is connected into another 
small valve, or petcock, arranged to re- 
ceive a rubber hose. When this boiler is 
heated and a sufficient steam pressure is 
generated the hose is inserted into the 
pump, and from its flexible character, 
with the pressure behind, it readily finds 
its way to the ice, and a very few min- 
utes is all that is necessary in the ma- 
jority of instances to remove the ice, 
even though it be as much as fit) feet 
distant from the little boiler. The facts 
that every shop has its gasoline solder- 
ing furnace and can easily make a little 
boiler and that the apparatus when need- 
eded can be easily carried to the place 
where its services are needed render this 
method of thawing widely available. 



Time spent in talking cheap goods is 
time wasted— you'll never have another 
chance with the same customer. 



MERRELL COMBINED HAND 
AND POWER MACHINES 




No. 5% cuts and threads pipe 1 to i inches' 
inclusive. No. 6% cuts and threads pipe 1 
to 6 inches, inclusive. Both have our 
Standard adjustable quick-opening and clos- 
ing die heads and our improved cutting- 
off knife. The chasers are five in num- 
ber. The vise is self-centering and is 
actuated by a rack and pinion to feed the 
pipe to the chasers. These machines are bet- 
ter and more rapid both in threading and 
cutting off, than any other combination ma- 
chine on the market. They have a greater 
range of work and make quicker changes 
from size to size of pipe. 

Our Catalogue is interesting- 

™ CANADIAN FAIRBANKS GO. 

Sole Agents for Canada Limited 

MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEC, VANCOUVER 



Don't Forget the Name. .. 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic or 
otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 




5 5 5 

GUARANTEED 



At the Same Price 

Isn't it Best to use the Kind that are 

GUARANTEED 

FOR 

5YEARS 5 YEARS 5 

BY 

GLAUBER, ™ D ' 




m 






Simply putting the 
brand on the pipe doesn't 
make it better pipe 

Unless we put the 
"better" into the pipe 
first, we'd not DARE 
brand it. 

That brand, put right 
into the metal every 
three feet while the pipe 
is hot, means we guar- 
antee the pipe's quality. 

"Guarantee" means 
all that it ought to mean 
to you— and that's a lot. 

Maybe you think our 
prices for P-H pipe show 
the quality we put in the 
goods ? They don't 

This better pipe costs 
you just as much as the 
kind you buy WITHOUT 
any guarantee— and that 
the makers aren't sure 
enough about to brand. 

Will you read the book 
that makes the whole 
story plain ? 

Glad to send you a 
copy as soon as you ask. 

Page-Hersey Iron &Tube Co. 

GUELPH, • ONTARIO 




THIS 



TRADE 




MARK 



will be found on all 

GENUINE ARMSTRONG 




STOCKS and DIES 



THE ARMSTRONG MFG. CO. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



68 



January 13, 1906 PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING Hardware and Metal 

\A/o make Electric Fixtures, Sockets, arid Cut-Outs 




•Electrical Supplies of all Rinds. 



MONTREAL 



Brass and Copper Pipe 

Our Stock comprises 

BRASS : y&-m. to 3-in. in Iron Pipe sizes 
COPPER: %r\n. to 2-in. " 
All orders shipped promptly. Correspondence solicited 

WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S. 




Hardware and Metal 



PLUMBING AND STEAMFITTING January 13, 1906 

^/WVVVVVWWVVVWWWWSvVVWWVWW* 



IMPROVED 



Daisy Hot Water Boilers 




Simplest in 
Construction. 

Economical, 
Efficient. 

Sales exceed 
all others. 

Every Boiler 
Guaranteed. 



We also carry large stocks of 
Iron Pipe, Cast and Malleable 
Fittings, Brass Goods, etc., 
insuring prompt shipments. 

Send us your rush orders 
and note results. 



R. J. CLUFF & CO. 

50 and 52 Lombard Street, Toronto. 

ONTARIO AGENTS FOR 

WARDEN KING & SON, MONTREAL 





e GfST£& 



DIAMOND -BRAND-FITTINGS 

Manufactured and Guaranteed by 

The Oshawa Steam »* Gas Fittings Go. 

Limited 

Stocked by all Leading Wholesale Houses. 
SPECIALTIES 

Hot Air Furnaces. Sash Weights and Washers. 

Fine Grey Iron Castings. 

OS HA WA, - CANADA 



Yours for a Prosperous 
—Year in 1906= 



THE 
CLOSET AND SEAT 



snm 




The New! Year has 
started on its career 

Is your balance on the right side of the ledger ? 

If so, is it as large as you would like ? 

If not — why not ? 

Have you utilized every chance you have had to 
make money ? 

Our customers, those handling the |M^v!mjSl(II) 
Closet, are all satisfied? 

Their business and bank accounts have increased 
wonderfully, and it has been our pleasure to assist 
them. 

Let us help you; write for our proposition. 

Made with high or low tank— finished with 
the best of wood work by 

The IMmums) Company 



G. H. MUCKENHIRN 

PRESIDENT 



Salem, NJ. 



70 



January 13, 1906 



PLUMBING AND STEAM FITTING 



Hardware and Metal 



,1 



MUELLER WATER STRAINER 

PATENTED 




C. Kill 

Solid matter carried in the water often causes as 
much wear and tear to the faucets as they get from 
their daily use. 

A Mueller Water Strainer will strain such matter 
from the water before it reaches the faucets. Faucets 
thus protected will be, in many instances, good for 
twice as long service as they would otherwise. 

The Mueller Water Strainer is made or cast iron, has a brass gauge 
screen and brass plug and is made for all sizes of pipe up to 3 inch. 

Each Strainer is carefully inspected and assembled, is given a 200- 
pound hydraulic pressure test as near like actual service use as possible, 
bears the Mueller trade mark and is unconditionally guaranteed. 

H. MUELLER MFG. CO. 



Decatur, III., U.S.A. 



New York, N.Y., U.S.A. 



Phone No. 

Parkdale 1809 



Post Office and Telegraph Address 

Swansea 



The Dominion Sewer Pipe Co., Limited 

Swansea, Toronto, Ont. 

We have just completed one of the finest sewer pipe fac- 
tories in America equipped with the latest machinery, and 
are now producing very superior 



KWER ; £lPrt°L T 



VITRIFIED SALT GLAZED 

SEWER PIPES 

in sizes from 4 inches to 24 inches. Price lists and discounts 
on application 

The Dominion Sewer Pipe Co., Limited 

Works : Swansea, Toronto, Ont. 




SEND FOR A FREE 



ETU n ^ED 

FEB 17 mQ 



SAMPLE OF 



• Crl 



dU^ 



^MR-BANK'S 



RED SHEET 




OF 



KING 



The best for Steam, Air, Water, Gas and Ammonia 
Tear off the corner of this ad. and mail it to us and 
we will - send you a free sample of the best sheet 
packing- you ever used. 



fss 



Do It Now. 



The CANADIAN FAIRBANKS CO., Limited 



MONTREAL TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 








71 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



A PERMANENT 

• nd Handsome Roof. 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing 

Will bring you profitable trade and satisfied customers. Comes in rolls ready to 
lay, all ready covered with gravel. Requires no experience to lay, and lasts 
for years without further attention. 

A. C. JENKING & CO, Sole Agents, 
Room 210 Corlstlne Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sole agents being appointed in each district. Write to-day. 



MACHINE MADE 

TEA KETTLE SPOUTS 

In self colour or Bright Tinned. Perfect shape and quality. Made in 5 sizes - 
Write for samples and quotation and state quantity required. ACENT8 WANTED. 

ERNEST STEVENS, STOUR WORKS, 

CRADLEY HEATH, ENGLAND 





RED DEVIL" gin I GLAZIER'S TOOL. 

Do not accept other makes us substitutes toi RED DEVIL tools. Insist upon having then.. 




See your dealer or jobber about Red Devil Took, or write us for Glaziers' section of the 
Preen Book of Hardware Sj^cialties. 

SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., oept.s, 296 Broadway, New York 

ALLEN C. JENKING & CO., Room 215 Corlstine Bldg.. MONTREAL. 



ARE YOU IN NEED OF 



SPRINGS ? 

We make them any shape 

Send samples for prices 

The WALLACE BARNES CO., BRISTOL, Conn. 



The most light for the least money 

C. G. E. INCANDESCENT LAMPS 

LONG LIFE EFFICIENCY RELIABILITY 

Write for prices and quantity discounts. 

CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICE: TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices: Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, Bossland 



HAVE YOU ORDERED YET? 

We want every Hardwareman in the country to carry a stock of 

METALLIC ASH-SIFTERS 

We know they can be sold, for we are working on "rush orders" now. 

We will guarantee that you can sell ten Metallic Ash-Sifters easier 

than one wooden sifter. 

We have a Circular which tells all. 



C. M. CUTTS & CO., sole Makers, Toronto Junction, Ont. 



Sort Up Your Stove and Heating Slock. 

TRY OUR UNEQUALLED 

STANDARD OAK 

FOR A HEATER. 

SOVEREIGN 

AS A COOKING RANGE. 
Finest Fuel Saving Furnacesntaanada 
Bare your coal and wood. Building stoves 
is a science we have mastered. All our lines 
are money makers. 

Send direct or ask your nearest Jobber. 

OTTAWA FURNACE AND FOUNDRY CO. 

Limited 

OTIHWl, ONTARIO 



A WORD TO PLUMBERS 



Our Pipe Die reduces the labor in 
threading pipes at least one half. Try 
it, it will cost you nothing to try it. We 
secure you against possible loss by our 
offer to return your money on return 
of the die within thirty days, if it is 
not satisfactory. It is surely worth a 
trial on these conditions. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 



HESPELER 



ONTARIO 




KERR'S GENUINE WEBER 
QATE VALVES 

have many imitations, but none equal 
the " real " article made by us. Be 
sure you get "Kerr's." Every valve 
made of the best red metal, and 
beautifully finished. 

The KERR ENGINE CO., 

Manufacturers Limited 

WALKERVILLE, ONT., CANADA 



72 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



i SHEET BRASS >-" COLD ROLLED COPPER \ 

_____ 1 

We are now fully equipped and can fill all orders for these metals. •> 

Send us specifications of your requirements. Write for our Discount Sheet. 



X 



CANADA BRASS ROLLING MILLS, 

& X LIMITED ♦*. 

X mills: NEW TORONTO, CAN. Head Office: 98 King St. W„ TORONTO X 



»j 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing Canadian, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



BRONZE POWDER AND LIQUID 

use<1 by every steam-fitter. Ask your supply bouses 
for our goods for best results. Or, if they have not 
got them, write direct to 

R. E. THORNE 



768 Craig Street 
MONTREAL 



29 Melinda Street 
TORONTO 



Subscribe to the 



OIL AND COLOURMtl'S JOURNAL 

for news of the British Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 



2.00 per year from date, 



Subscription for Canada, 
post free. Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD & CO. 

I* IUDGATE HILL LONDON. ENO 



UNITED KINGDOM 

HERBERT RODGERS & CO. 

Saracen House, Snow Hill, London, Eng. 

Direct representatives of manufacturers of hard- 
ware and allied goods, well established, with sound 
connection throughout the United Kingdom. Will 
firms desiring representatives kindly communi- 
cate? Cables, " Rogemini." London. 



Mantels, 
Grates, 
Tile, etc. 

A Nice Mantel 
is a fine piece 
of Furniture. 



Batty Stove and Hardware Co. 

182 Adelaide Street West 




OXFORD HOT WATER 
HEATING SYSTEMS PAY WELL 



When you push the Oxford lines 
you have our reputation behind you. 
Dealers make money and friends by 
recommending and installing the Ox- 
ford System. Every system installed 
gives absolute satisfaction and you get 
the credit for it. 

The superiority of the Oxford 
Boiler is apparent to every practical 
man at a glance. The upper walls of 
the fire-pot are inclined inward over 
the fire so that the heat strikes against 
them instead of passing directly up, as 
is the case with straight walls. This 
is the greatest practical improvement 
made in boiler construction in years. 

By increasing the area of these 
surfaces, the heating power of the 
boiler is greatly increased. 

We have repeated the principle in 
the first water section nearest the fire, 
adding further to the efficiency of this 
boiler as a heating apparatus. 

We have done away with the use 
of rubber or composition gaskets and 
washers in making connections. We 
use our Oxford Steel Push Nipples in 



j use our Uxtord bteel Fusn nappies in 

I making all connections, thereby as- 

suring a permanent iron-to-iron joint. 



Oxford Hot Water and Steam Radiators 

used with Oxford Boilers give absolute satisfaction, assure economy and talk 
strong for more business for you. 

Send for the Gurney Oxford Book of Steam and Hot W r ater Heating 
Apparatus. 

WE also manufacture Cast Iron Stoves and Ranges, Steel Plate 
Ranges. Gas Stoves. Ranges and Heaters, Hotel Ranges, 
and complete Hotel Kitchen Outfits, Warm Air Furnaces and all kinds 
of Cooking and Heating Apparatus, Plumbers' Supplies. 




The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 
The Gurney-Massey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. H0 

The Curney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



Five Fast-Selling Lines 

CK DIAMJ 



"BLACK DIAMOND" 

READY ROOFING U^ WRAPPING PAPER 

SHEATHING ^ffl^ BUILDING PAPER 

TAR ELT! 



[fyou are not selling them, your Hardware-Neighbor is. "Cyclone" and "Joliette" Brands of Sheathing 

are especial favorites. Have you them in stock ? 

Let us send you full particulars concerning our goods. 



8a HcQILL STREET 



ALEX. HcARTHUR & CO., Limited, Montreal 



F. J. C. COX, Winnipeg, Sole Agent for Northwest Provinces. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Jan. 12, 1906 
These prices are for such qualities and 

Quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
ealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor i3 anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Latnb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $39 00 W0 00 
TINPLATES 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

M L.8., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

IC.H . . 86 50 

IX 14x20 " 8 00 

IXX, 14x2i'basc 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

IC, 14 \ I 1 " base 6 50 

I X, 14 x 20 " 8 B0 

[XX. 14x20 base 9 50 

Raven and Vulture tirades— 

IC, 14 x20 base 4 25 

IX " 5 00 

IXX " 5 75 

I X X X " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best "—Double 

Coated, Tissued. Per box 

I C. 14 \ 20 ba.-e 5 50 

I X. 14x20 " 6 50 

IXX, 14 x20" 7 50 

Allawavs Best "—Standard Quality. 

I C, !4 \ 20 base 4 75 

I X 11 x 20 " 5 75 

[XX, 14x20 " 6 75 

Bright Cokes. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., 14x20 base 3 75 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 00 

20x28 8 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 1 
I). ii or .1 O. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 10 

IX., Terne Tin 8 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley tirade— 

X X, 14x56,50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " > .... 7 00 
" 14x65. " I 
Tinned Sheets. 

2x30 up to 24 gauge 7 50 

" 26 '■ 7 50 8 00 

IRON AM) STEEL. 

Montreal. Toronto. 

Common bar. per 100 lb 2 01 2 00 

Forged iron " 2 28 2 43 

Refined " " 2 40 2 4r> 

Horseshoe iron " 2 40 2 40 

Hoop steel 14 to 3 in. base 2 75 

Sleigh shoe steel " ....2 171 2 20 

Tire steel 2 274 2 30 

Best sheet steel u 12 

B K Morton* Co.— 

"Alpha" highspeed 65 

annealed 70 

M Selt-lmr.leriing 50 

"J quality test warranted .... 18 

"I " warranted 14 

09 

Jonas a Culver's tool steel.. . 10 20 

" Novo" 65 

" annealed 65 

Leonard 08 09 

CrucibleStei 

Bex high speed steel. . 65 75 

t hardening 45 50 

Crucible Special 16 

Slver steel C 12 

Black Diamond . . . f'8 09 
Thos Jowett * Sons B P I. 

tool steel annealed I0| 

Self-hardening 45 

Rapid self-hardening 75 



Sanderson's Crucible steel OS 09 

Superior " .... 12 13 

BABBIT METAL, 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 07 

No. 4 06 

Canada Smelting (' v, Limited. 

Hard Genuine Babbit 40 

Standard Anti-Friction Babbit 30 

Special Babbit 25 

Car Box Babbit 20 

Extra " 15 

No. 1 " 012 

No. 2 " °7 

No. 3 " 054 

Standard Phosnhor Tin 40 

On large orders special discounts given. 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

14 gauge 2 55 

IK gauge 2 40 2 30 

18 " 2 35 2 35 

20 to 24 gauge 2 30 2 50 

26 ' 2 30 2 70 

28 " 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 

Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary, V2 sheets 2 61 

All bright " 3 85 

Galvanized Canada Plates, 52 sheets 4 10 

Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. 

Fleur-de-LiB. Goidon Crown 

16 to 20 gauge 3 35 

22 to 24 gauge 3 60 3 75 

26 " . . 3 85 4 00 

28 " . . 4 10 4 25 

Apjlln. 

1"J oz. (American gauge) 4 15 

28 gaiue " 4 00 

26 " " 3 85 

24 " " 3 75 

Comet Bell. Queen's Head. 

16 to 20 gauge 3 25 
22 to 24 gauge 3 50 3 75 

26 " 3 75 4 00 

28 4 00 4 25 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 
CHAIN 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 10 00 

J " 5 60 

5-16 " 4 45 

] " 3 85, 

7-16 " 3 70 

J " 3 55 

9-16 " 3 45 

" •§ " 3 35 

I " 3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixt.urep 35 p.c. 



Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. , [count 40 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 



COPPER. 

Ingot. 



Per 100 1b. 
. . . 20 50 



Casting, car lots 

Bars. 

Out lengths, round, 4 to J in 26 00 . 

round and square, 
Cut 1 to 2 inches.... 25 00 26 00 

Sheet. 
Plain, 16 oz„ 14x48 and 14x60 ... 25 00 

Plain, 14 oz 26 00 

Tinned copper sheet 27 00 

Planished 34 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 25 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 24 
" 50-lb. and above " 23 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned \ «„„„„„, „« i;„, 

a.. lm I 3:) per cent, off list. 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 10 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 7 25 7 50 

Domestic " " 7 00 7 25 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 8 00 8 00 

Part casks 8 25 8 25 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig. per 100 lb 4 65 

Bar, " " 4 80 

Sheets, 24 lb. sq. ft., by roll 051 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 054 

Note.— Cut sheets 4c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.o. Toronto. 

Note. — Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
si. lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb.. 144 15 00 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.: buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Net 
list. Prices are f. o. b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 2 p.c. for cash in thirty days. 

PLUMBING GOODS 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Ideal Enameled. 

Plate EI, Fittings extra 1st quality Special 

4 and 4J ft. 3 in rolled rim.. $19 15 17 15 

5 feet " ..20 15 18 15 
54 " " .. 21 65 19 65 

6 " " ..24 40 22 40 
Plate E II 

5 feet 24 in. " ..18 65 16 65 

5J " 24 " " •• 20 15 18 15 

LAVATORIES. 

1st quality. Special. 

PlaV E 100 to E103 S0p.C. 30 & 10 p.c. 

" E104toE132 30&5p.c. 40 p.c 

Sinks 18 x 30 in flat rim, A quality. .. 2 55 
" " ' B " 2 40 

IRON PIPE. 

Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

J inch 2 75 

} " 2 09 

| " 2 09 

4 " 2 43 

3 " 3 05 

74 



Black pipe— Per 100 fee'. 

1 inch 4 37 

U " 5 96 

14 " 7 15 

5 " 9 54 

Galvanized pipe— 

4 inch 2 91 

3 " 291 

1 " 3 27 

\ " 4 20 

1 " 6 t2 

11 " 8 22 

1J " 9 86 

2 " 1311 

Lead Pipe discount 20 per cent 

Malleable Fittings— Canadian discount 35 per 

cent.; American discount 25 per cent. 
Cast Iron Fittings— Standard buBhings 65 
per cent.; headers. 65 ; flanged unions 
and lipped, 65 ; malleable bushings, 60 ; 
nipples, up to 6 in., 75 percent. 

PLUMBERS BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis 574 l>.c 
Cushion work, discount 50 and lu p.c. 
Fuller work, discount 60 n.c. on la ge sizes and 

65 on sma 1 sizes. 
12 dozen lota and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 
Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 

per cent Within lots of 12 dozen and over 

an extra discount of 10 per cent. 
J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves. 

discount 571 per cent. 
Kerr's special standard globeB angles and 

checks, discount 57' percent. 
Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc and 

heavy standard valves, discount 55 perctnt 
Kerr's standard brass disc steam copper-alloy 

disc and quick-opening hot-water radiator 

valves, discount 65 per cent. 
Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 

valves, brass, discount 474 per cent. 
Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 

valves, I. B.B.M., discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 per 

cent. 
Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 70 

per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 35 

No. 44, " " 2 £0 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold, per doz., $15. 
Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 6i percent 

" " iron " " 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-'est Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILERS 

Copper 30 gallon " 22 00 

r ' 35 " " 24 00 

" 40 " " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 

GALVANIZED IRON RANGE BOILERS 

Capacity. Standard. Extra heavy 

Gals. 

12 4.50 6.50 

18 4.75 6.75 

24 4.75 6.75 

30 ' 5.00 7.50 

35 6.00 850 

40 7.00 9.50 

52 11.00 14.00 

66 18.00 20,00 

82 21 00 24 00 ;. 

100 29.00 34.00 

120 34.00 40.00 

144 55.01 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLAUSS BRAND HOUSEHOLD SHEARS 



a 



FULLY WARRANTED 

The best Shear on the market for 
general house use, being an exceptionally 
fine cutting and wearing Shear. 

Manufactured by our secret process. 

ASK FOR DISCOUNTS 



The Clauss Shear Co., 




Toronto, Ont, 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 

Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 

per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

SINKS. 

Castirun, 16x24 85 

18x30 100 

18x36 1 40 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, lj-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " 34 

sor. her. Peril'. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed '22 23 
Wiping 18 2 J 

PAINTS AND OILS. 



COLORS IN OIL. 

1-lb. tins, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 

Chrome yellow 

Golden ochre 

French " 

Marine black 

Chrome green 

French permanent green 

Signwriters' black 



Sterling House Paint 

" Floor " 

National . . 

Jamieson's "Crown An'-hor' 



1 25 
1 25 



GROUND WHITE LEAD. 

Pure 6 00 

No. 1 5 60 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

Munro's Select Flake White 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure .... 

Tiger brand, pure 

Decorators' Special for ex • 

terior use 

Monarch 

Decorator's Pure 

Essex Genuine 

Sterling Pure 

Island City Pure 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 5 50 

Ramsay's Exterior 5 '25 

" Crown and A nchor, " pure 

RED t.E vi>. 
Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt .... 
Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 

DKV WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 1 7 

French V. M 06 

Lehigh 05 

GROUND WHITE ZTNO. 

Pure ' .... o 08 

No. 1 n 61 

No. 2 5? 



08 
15 
08 
06 
01 
10 
13 
15 

Per 100 lbs 



DRY WHITE LEAD. 



Pure, casks . 
Pure, kegs... 
No. 1, casks . 
No. 1. kegs... 



PREPARED PAINTS. 



6 31 
5 75 
5 55 
4 62J 

4 55 

5 65 
5 50 
5 75 

5 00 
5 75 
5 50 
5 0(1 
5 75 
5 75 
5 75 
5 50 
5 50 



85 00 
5 25 

4 75 

5 CO 



08 
07 
06 



09 
07! 
C 06} 



5 25 
5 50 

4 75 

5 00 



%J 



In }, 4 and 1-gallon t 

Pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, per gallon . . 

Barn (in bbls. ) 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 
ifal. 
gal... 

Canada Paint Go's pure 

Toronto Lead & Color Co's pure 

Sanderson Pearcy'd pure .... 

Standard Co. 's "New Era.".. 

FraDCis-FrostCo.'s "Ark" B'd 

" British Navy deck 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, ner gal. 

Thistle, " 

Outside, bbls 

Island City House Paint 

" Floor " .... 



1 20 
1 00 

90 

1 40 
1 35 
1 30 
1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 30 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
1 20 
1 00 

65 

1 25 
1 25 



Canadian English 
Paris (ireen. Per lb. 

Petroleum, barrels 15', 15;,' 

Arsenic, kegs 154 16 

50 and 10 i lb. drums 16 16J 

25 1b. drums 161 17 

1 lb. paper boxes 17 17* 

4 lb. tins 18 181 

\ lb. paper boxes 19 194 

lb tins .' 204 

Terms 2 per cent, off 30 days or 90 days. 

PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 50 

Bulk in less quantitv 1 80 

Bladders in bbls 1 

Bladders in Kegs, boxes or loose 1 90 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

124 lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish 1 35 1 50 

Light oil finish 1 60 1 70 

Damar 1 75 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

'' No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, $1.20 

size 2, 70c. ; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal.. $2.50. 

Canada Paint Cos sun varnish 2 00 

Capaliine, per gal. can 2 00 

CJLUE. 

Common 08 084 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 1° 20 

Ground 12 16 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and5 and 25 per cent. 

American $2.00 per 1000. 

C. B. Caps American, $2.60 per 1000. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 30 p.c., American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, \dd 20 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, list net Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. American 
10 per cent, advance on list. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades.25 per cent, discount. 
American 20 per cent, discount. Rival 
and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.: American $1.75 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 29 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 



Ihin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 9 " 1 9u 

ADZES. 

Discount 224 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10} 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09} 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over llj 

APPLE PARERS. 

Woodyatt Hudson, per doz., net 4 50 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 60 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

Red Ridge, boys', ! handled 5 75 

" hunters 5 25 

Underhill American Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 6 00 7 00 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELLS. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 635 per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro", discount 50 e.nd 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 35 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 35 40 

BELTING. 
Extra, 60 per cent. 
Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 
No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 474 per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list Per cent . 
" f and smaller. . 60 and 10 

" 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

" full sq. ($2. 40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, | and 
less 55 



Q 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 

Plough Bolts 55 and 

Blank Bolts 55 and 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 and 5 

Nuts, square, ad sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stove RodB per lb., 54 to 6c. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS 

Discount 624 per cent. 

BUTCHERS CLEAVERS 

fJerman ner doz. 6 00 9 00 . 

American " 12 00 18 00 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 2 00 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll (-5 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 20 

Carpet Felt per ton El) 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Surprise (1 42'. 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar ' " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L.... " 400 " 70. 

Resin-sized ' 400 ' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 ' 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 ' 70 

Root Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar rper barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 80 90 

Slater's felt per roll 60 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $1.30 for 24-inch, and $1.70 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 

Loose Pin, discount 60 per ceni 

Wrought Steel. 

Fast Joint, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent 
Loose Pin, discount 70 to 70 and 5 per cent. 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's " .... 6 50 



Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 50 8, 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 005 006 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 

Broad's, discount 70 per cent. 

Wamock's, discount 70 per cent. 

P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent 

CLOTHES REELS. 

Davis Clothes Reels, dis. 40 per cen 



75 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



A Profitable Investment 

is made when you lay in a stock of Paterson's Building 
Papers and Wire Edged Ready Roofing. These goods 
have the Quality and Reputation that make them popular 
with your customers. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

1-inoh per .100 feet S 00 

. !! ■' •' 5 25 

i .. " " 675 

S » •• 9 00 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 

Copper boiler*, kettles, teapot*, etc.. 4oper 

sent. 
Copper pitts, 35 per cent 

0RADLE9, GRAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 
CROB8CUT SAW HANDLES. 

S.4D..N0.3 perpair 15 

8.4D., '• 5 „ 022J 

9.4D., " 6 „ 0W 

Boynton pattern l m 

DOOR SPRrNOS. 

lorrey'sRod perdoz. .... 175 

Coil.Stollin 95 165 

English 2 00 * °° 

DRAW KJJIVE8. 

Coach and Wagon, discount 70 per oent. new 

list. 
Carpenter*' discount 70 per oent. 
DRILL8. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millars Falls, per doz., net list 

DRILL BITS. 
Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

. FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

KAVETROUGHS. 

10-incb perlOOft. 1 00 

ELBOWS (stovepipe.) 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 32 

7-inch J « 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 
discount 50 per cent ■ • 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 
10 per cent - • • 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 
50, 10 and 10 per oenc. 

Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 

" Star " decorated steel and decorated white, 

25 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 
Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RA8P8. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney 4 Foot 70 10 

Disston's 70 " 10 ' 

American 70 ' 10 

J Barton Smith 70 " 10 

McClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 lo 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 'o 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 274 per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'b "Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to 81.50. 

OLA8S. 

Window. Box Price. 

Double 
Star Diamond 

Si* United Per Per 

Inches. 100 ft. 100 ft. 

(Tnder 26 84 25 86 25 

26 to 40 4 65 6 75 

41 to 50 5 10 7 50 

51 to 60 6 85 8 50 

M to 70 5 75 9 75 

71 to 81 6 25 11 '0 

81 to 65 7 tO 12 51 

86 to HO 11 HO 

91 to 95 17 50 

»i to 100 20 50 



101 to 105 24 00 

lOOtollO 27 50 

For less than 100 feet of one size, pane 
list less 334^. Terms 90 days net 2$ 30 days. 

GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 % 40 

GILLETTS POWDERED LYE. 

1-oise, 83.70 ; 3-case, 83.60 ; 5-case and over 
• 83.50. 

HAXTERS. 

Rope, 1-inch per gross 

Rope, I " " 

Rope, | to |-inch " 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 1} " " 

Web " 



9 00 
12 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



1 10 


1 20 


07 


08* 


22 


25 


3 00 
1 00 


4 00 
1 50 


revised 


list. 



HAMMERS. 

Nail 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 274 per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetio per doz. 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 

HANDLES. 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 
Store door perdoz. 

Fork. 
C. i B., discount 40 per cent., 

Hoe. 
0. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Saw. 
American per doz 1 00 1 25 

Plane. 
American per grOBS 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

hangers. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 10 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

" 5-inch 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Lace's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 114, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run ... 2100 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 in( 100 ft) .... 3 75 

1} x 3-16 inflOO ft) .... 4 75 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

8. & D. lawn rakes, Dunn's, 40 off. 

sidewalk and stable scrapers, 40 off. 
" Maple Leaf and Premiums saw sets, 

40 off. 
" saw swages, 40 off. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel, TJnderhill 5 00 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Henderson & Potts' "Anchor Brand " 



Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06} 

5-in., ". 06} 

6-in., " 06 

.8-in., " 05! 

10-in., " 05J 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to !0 in per 100 lb 

12in. up " 

Spring, No 20, per gro. pairs 

Spring. Woodyatt pattern, per gro , 
817.50; No. 10, 818; No. 20, 810f 



4 50 
3 25 

10 80 

No. 5. 

No. 



120, 820 ; No. 51. 810 : No. 50, 827.50. 



HOES. 
Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE 

Tinned cast, 35 per cent 

HOOKS. 
Cast Iron. 

Birdcage perdoz. 50 1 10 

Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier perdoz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 624 per cent. 

Belt perl.OOO .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 624 Per ijent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

'C brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list I Oval 
M.R.M. Co. brand, 55 per cent. I head 

"Monarch," 50 and 74 per cent. 

' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 

M. R,M. Co. brand, base 3 65 

Add 15c. Toronto, Hamilton, Guelph. 

JAPANNED WAP.E. 
Discount 50 per cent. 

PICKS. 

Star perdoz. 3 00 S 25 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet trunk and padlock 
American per gross — 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 150 250 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. 4 L. 

screw per groBS 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs perdoz 2 00 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 

Discount, 60 per cent. 

LADDERS, EXTENSION. 

Waggoner Extension Ladders, dis. 40 per cent 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 4 50 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. - 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LAWN MOWERS FOR 1906. 

Woodyatt 12 to 20-in. cut. ... 8 3 95 to 85 00 

Star, 12 to 16-in cut .. 2 75 to 3 05 

Daisy, all sizes 2 50 

Woodyatt. hall bearing, 12 to2<Mn 5 60 to 7 45 
Philadelphia, King Edward and grass boxes, 
50 per cent, off 1905 list. 

Horse Lawn Mowers, "Special. 
Discount, 40 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined perdoz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LOOKS 
Canadian, to 50 and In per oent. 
Russell * Krwin. si«e' rim . per dot. 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 



Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 125 150 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 300 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 00 

MEAT CUTTERS 

German, 15 per cent. 

merican discount, 334 per cent. 

Gem each 116 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 
Discount 25 per cent. 

nails. Out. Wire. 

2d S SO 3 05 

3d 2 95 2 70 

4 and 5d 2 70 2 45 

6 and 7d 2 60 2 35 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 20 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 15 

16and20d 2 35 2 10 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 05 

F.o.b. Montreal. Toronto 10c. higher 
Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent 
Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent.. 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 85 2 50 

No. 1 85 

No 1573 75 

NAIL SETS. 
Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 percent. 
2-in. Mesh 16 w.g. 60 per cent. 
Smaller than 2 in. dis. 55 per cent. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers " .... 3 00 

OILERS. 
McClary e Model galvanized 

oil can, with pump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 
Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GAXVANIZED PAIL8. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per oent 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cert. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt . flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per ceul 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Creamer canB, discount 40 per cent. 

PICKS. 

Per dozen ... 600 900 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent 

PINE TAR. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

"• " " ... 9 60 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent. 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American 374 

40 per cent 



76 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half- Rounds and 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

OOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 



PLANK IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

button's genuine, per doz. pairs, di 
371 to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 

man " 

PRESSED SPIKES. 
I iscount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 

Axle " 

Screw " 

Awning 

« PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 

Canadian pitcher spout 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers perdoz. 100 

Conductor's " 3 00 

Tinners', solid per set — 

" hollow per inch 



5 00 
60 



55 
22 
22 
35 



1 40 
1 80 



9 00 
60 



1 00 

33 

1 00 

2 50 



2 0016 
3 



1 85 
15 00 

72 

1 00 



RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up 

razors. per doz. 

Elliot's 4 00 18 00 

Geo. Butler's & Co. 's 4 00 18 00 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 13 50 18 50 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 10 00 

Wilkinson's 12 50 

Oarbo Magnetic 15 00 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 10 75 

Griffon No. 65 13 00 

Griffon Safety Razors 13 50 

Griffon Stropping Machines 13 50 

Lewis Bros ' '' Klean Kutter" 8 50 10 50 

Hindoo 10 50 14 00 

Orgsteom's Swedish 3 50 10 00 

Henckel's 7 50 20 00 

Clauss, 50 and 10 percent. 
Clauss Strops, 50 and 10 per cent. 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURKS. 

New List. 
Iron Rivets, black and tinned, 60 and 10 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 40 

per oent. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, $-lb. 

packages lc. per lb.; }-lb. packages 2c. lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37 J per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal... 104 

Pure Manilla 15 

"British" Manilla 11$ 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger ..... .0 21 23 

" 5-32inch 25 27 

" Jincb 25 28 

Russia Deep Sea 16 

Jute 09 

Lath Tarn, single 10 

double 10$ 

Sisal bed cord. 48 feet per doz. 65 

1 " 60 feet " 80 

•* 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 
Boxwood, discount 70 per oent. 
Ivory, discount 20 to 25 per cent 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 75 

" No. 50, nickle-plated, " 80 

Common, plain 4 50 

" plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. & A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Emery, discount 40 per oent. 
Garnet (Rurton's). 5 to 10 per oent advance 
on lint. 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks p»r 1,000 7 50 

" Eureka " tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 



Hand, Disston's, discount 12$ per cent 
S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 035 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

S. & D. solid tooth circular shingle, concave 
and band, discount 50 per cent. 
" mill and ice, drag, discount 30 per cent 
" cross-cut, discount 35 per cent. 

hand saws, butcher, disc't 40 per cent 
" compass, pruning and back, discount 
45 per cent. 

buck, New Century $6 25 

" Mo. 1 Maple Leaf 5 25 

" " Happy Medium 4 25 

" Watch Sprfng 4 25 

common frame 4 OP 



SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 

Solid " 1 50 

SASH CORD. 



2 25 
1 75 



31 



Per lb... 

saw SETS. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets, Perfect 4 00 

X-Cut Sets, " 7 50 



Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
" Dominion, discouut 55 per cent 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
" Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6.75 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish pel doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 



Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 87$ 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 82$ pei cent. 

" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 

" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 

' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 87$ per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

8et, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 
Clauss, nickel, discount 80 per cent. 
Clauss, Japan, discount 67$ per cent. 
Clauss, tailors, discount 40 per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SNAPS. 
Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Look, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 



SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 492 perdoz. 190 2 25 

" No. 493 ........ " 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 and 5 to 65 per cent. 

Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52$per oent. 

STAMPED WARE. 
Plain, discount 75 and 12$ per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Returned, discount 75 per cent, off revised list 

STAPLES. 

Galvanized 2 75 

Plain 2 50 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " J9 09 

Labrador " 13 

" Axe " .... IE 

Turkey " 50 

Arkansas " i 50 

Water-of-Ayr " 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 40 to 200 lb., per ton 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " 28 00 

" 200 lb. and over 3100 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " '• .... 7 50 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 15 

" " tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Out tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk. . .85, 12$ and 12 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

apanned 75 and 12$ 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet ta&ts 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52$ 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 ana 10 

' bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Per doz 3 00 15 00 

Clauss, discount 35 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 per cent 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game,H.&N.,P. S. & W., 45 and 5 per oent. 
Game, steel, 60 and 5 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Lisston's, discount 10 per oent. 

German perdoz. 4 75 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

77 



TWINES. 

Bag, Russian ..per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply o 24 

4-ply o 27 

Mattress per lb 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

vises. 

w "B h ,t's 13* 

Brook s o 121 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 350 

" No. 2 5 50 

SawVise 450 9 00 

Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 percent. 

" parallel (discount) 45 per oent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 

No. 0-9 gauge jjj 15 

}? " 60. extra. 

11 12c. " 

}2 " 20c. " 

}3 30c. '• 

" 40o " 

}5 55c. " 

16 " 70c. •• 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning 
Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c 
spring wire $1.25, special hay baling wire30o' 
best steel wire 75c., bright soft drawn 15o 
charcoal (extra quality) #1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15c, bagging and papering lOo , 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c., in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb 
hanks, 50c, in $-lb. hanks 75c, in 1-lb 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 30 per cent 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No 17 
$5-No. 18, $5.50-No. 19, $6-No. 20, $6 65-^ 
No. 21, $7-No. 22, $7.30-No 23, »7,65-No. 
24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50-No 27 
$10-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13- 
No.31, $14-No. 32, $15-No. 33, $16-N*. 34. 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2-Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. CopperetL 
75c— oiling, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles.dSc — in5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks 25o 
—in $-lb. hanks, 38c— in 1-lb. hanks, 50o — 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c 
Brass wire, discount 52$ per cent, off the liat. 
Copper wire, discount 52$ per oent. net cash 

30 days, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 1 and 5. 
$3.6) to $3.60-Nos. 6, 7. 8, $3.0, to $3 05 
-No. 9, $2.40 - No. 10, $3.10 to $3 10 
-No. 11, $3.15 to $3.15 -No. 12. $2 55 
-No. 13, $2.65-No. 14. $3.65 to $3.65-No 
15. $4.20-No. 16. $4.20 from stock. Base 
sizes, Nos. 6 to 9, $2.17$ f.o.b. Cleveland 
In carloto 12$c less. 
Clothes Line Wire, 7 wire solid line. No 
17. $4.90; No. 18, $3.00: No. 19, 2.70; 6 
wire solid line, No. 17, $4.45; No. 18, $2 80 
No. 19, $2.50. All prices per 1000 ft. measure,' 
F.o.b. Hamilton, Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb j 75 

Galvanized, plain twist 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $J 4S(f< r 
small lots and $2 . 30 for carlou. 

COILED SPRING WIB.S. 

HighCarbon, No. 9 $i^eo 

" No. 11 .,.' 325 

No.12 2 83 

WIRE CLOTH. 
Painted Screen, per lOOsq. ft., net.. 1 be 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting par doz 56 00 

Square " " 59 00 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 36 00 

New Century, per doz 72 00 

Daisy 48 00 

WRINGERS. 

Leader, 11 in perdoz 32 00 

Royal Canadian, 11 in. " .... 29 00 

Royal American, 11 in. ' .... 29 00 

Terms, 3 months, 2 per oent. 30 days. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make discount 40 per oent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



They aii Roil Best — The Best aii Roil on "Storm King Barn Door Track" 




MADE BY 



SAFETY DOOR HANGER CO., 



The superiority of Storm King Track 

is due to carefully selected material, 
good workmanship and perfection in 
every detail. Storm King Rail possesses 
all the salable qualities that go to 
make it what it is— the best Barn Door 
Rail made in Canada. 

Every piece stamped "GenuineStorm 
King," with our name. Insist on secur- 
ing this brand. 

Ask Your Jobber 

Hamilton, Canada 




Walker's Quick and Easy Meal and Fruit Juice Press 

Made to clamp to the table or hold in the hand. They are made in 
three sizes and three styles of each size; capacity, one-half pound of meat 
at a press full. 

As all the juice is out as soon as screwed down, several pounds can be 
pressed in short space of time. The real capacity is equal to others of larger 
and more expensive prices. 

ERIE SPECIALTY CO., ERIE, PA., U.S.A. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



A 

. i it. Lints and Auditors 18 

Alabastine Co 61 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 45 

American Steel and Wire Co 4 

Atkius, E. C, 1 Co IS 

Armstrong Mfg. Oo 68 

AtlasMfg.Co 4) 

Auer Light Co 7 

Awl I" Want Co 1C 

B 

Batty Stove Co 73 

Belleville Business Col'ege 18 

Barnett File Co out6ide back rover 

Birkett, Thoa., A Sou Co 1 

Borden Co 67 

Bradstreet s 12 

British America Assurance Co 17 

c 

Canada Brass Rollins Mills 73 

Canada Horse Nail Co 44 

Canada lion Furnace Co 39 

Canada Metal Co 16 

Canada Paint Co 39 

Canada Paper Co 12 

Canada Smelting Works 39, 45 

Canadian Sew er Pipe Co 60 

Canadian Fairbanks Co 71 

Canadian (lern-riil Electric Co V2 

Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co.. S3 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 15 

I I 80 

Carriage Mountings Mfg. Co 19 

Caverhill, Learniont & Co 9 

Clauas Shear Co 75 

Claybrough & Johnston 12 

duff. R. J., 4 Co 70 

Confederation Life 17 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 56 

Consumers Cordage Co 10 

Continental Heat and Light Oo .... 

Contract Record* o 12 

Cram. Rolla L. . Co 50 

CovertMfg.Co 60 

Cutts, O. M. * Co 72 

D 

David, R. Sullivan 16 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 2 

Deeeron'o Iron Co 39 

Diamond Saw and Stamping Works... 13 

Oieckiiiann. Ferdinand 59* 

Divine Wall H I - l» 

Dominion Belting Co 16 

nion Cartridge Co 20 

Dominion Sewer Pipe Co 71 

Aire Mfg. Co 13 

Ilorkeo Bros. outside front cover 

Dowswell UUl Do 10 

. 45 



E 

Eadie, H. G 12 

Eagle Cooperage Works 7 

Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Akron. Ohio 

inside back cover 

Erie Specialty Co 78 

F 

Falkiner. H. F 12 

Fenner, Frederick 45 

Fisher, A. D., Co 15 

Fmthingham 4 Workman 7 

Q 

Gibb, Alexander 73 

Gilbertson, W., 4 Co 16 

Glauber Brass Co 68 

Greening, B., Wire Oo 11 

Grey 4 Bruce Portland Cement Co ... . 60 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co 13 

Gurney Foundry Co 54,73 

Gurney, Tilden Co 61 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Oo.... 

outside back cover 

H 

Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Co 15 

Harris, J. W„ Co 53 

Heinisch, R., Sons Oo 16 

Henderson & Potts Oo 46 

Hobbs Mfg. Co , 19 

MortonMfg Cy 8 

Hotel D rectory 17 

Howland, H. S., Sons 4 Co 43 

Hyde, F. 4 Oo 60 

I 

Imperial Cement Co 00 

Imperial Varnish and Oolor Co 44 

J 

Jardine, A. B., 4 Co 72 

Jenkins. A 72 

Johnson's. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 42 

.1 03 Manufacturing Co 8J 

K 

Kemp Mfg. Oo 20 

Kerr Engine Co 72 

Kohler, F. E. 4 Co 80 

L 

Legal Cards 18 

Leslie, A. C, 4 Co 39 

Lewis Bros. 4 Oo 3 

Lewis. Rice, 4 Son inside front cover 

Lockerby 4 McComb 61 

London Rolling Mill Oo 77 

Longhead, J. S., 4 Son 12 

Lufkin Rule Oo inside back cover 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 

7 8 



Mo 

McArthur, Alex., 4 Oo 74 

McArthur, Corneille 4 Co. 49- 

McClary Mfg. Oo 53 

McCaskill, Dougall 4 Oo 45 

McDougall, R. Co 35 

McLean & Sophus 7 

M 

MacKay, J. M 18 

Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co 5 

Merrell Mfg. Co 68 

Metallic Roofing Oo 37 

Metropolitan Bank 17 

Moffat Stove Co 55 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co 42 

Morton, B. K., 4 Co j. 39 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg/Co 62 

Morrow, John. Machine Screw Co 16 

Mueller. H.. Mfg. Oo /. 71 

Munderloh & Co 69 

Munro Wire Works 35 

N 

Naturo Co 70 

Newman, W., 4 Sons 68 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Ooal Oo 39 

o 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons 35 

Oneida Community 14 

Ontario Lantern Co 35 

Ontario Tack Oo 41 

Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Oo . . 1T> 

Oshawa Steam 4 Gas Ftting Co 70 

Ottawa Furnace and Foundry Co 72 

P 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 68 

Paterson Mfg. Co 76 

Pelton, Godfrey I' 45 

Pease Foundry Co 59 

Penberthy Injector Oo 69 

Phillips. Ohaa. D 60 

Pink, Thos 6 

Q 

Queen City Oil Co 15 

R 

Ramsay, A.. 4 Son Oo B, 8J 

Robertson. James Co inside back cover 

Rogers, Herbert 4 Co 12, 73, 80 

Roper, J. H 14 

Round, John, 4 Son 4 



s 



Sadler 4 Haworth outside back oover 

Safety Door Hanger Co 78 

Samuel, M. 4 L. , Benjamin, 4 Oo 2 

Saunders, Franklia, 4 Co 39 

Scarfe & Co U 

Scott, Greenwood 4 Co 73 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 16 

Sharratt 4 Newth 37 

Shaw, A. , 4 Son 14 

Sherwin-Williams Co 41 

Silica Barytic Stone Oo CO 

Silberstein, A. L 1 

Smith 4 Hemenway Co 72 

Stairs, Son & Morrow 62 

Standard Ideal Sanitary Co 69 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works... 45 

Stanley Rule and Level Co 13 

Stauntons Limited 43 

Stephens, G. F.,4 Co 34 

Sterne, G. F., 4 Son 55 

Stevens, Ernst 72 

Summers, John, 4 Sons 6 



Taylor-Forbes Oo outside front cover 

Telford & Chapman 14 

Thompson, B. 4 S. H., Oo 

outside back cover 

Thome, RE 73 

Toronto Silver Plate Co 11 



u 



United Brass Mfg. Co 07 

United Typewriter Co 18 



w 



Walker Steel Range Co 54 

vVallace BarneB Co 72 

Warnock, James, & Co 11 

Weese, G. A., 4 Son 8J 

Welsh Tinplate 4 Metal Stamping Oo. 

Inside back cover 

Western Assurance Cj 17 

Western Wire Nail Co 12 

Whittaker Stove Works 55 

Wilcox Mfg. Co 15 

Wilkinson Plow Co 14 

Winnipeg Ceiling and Roofing Co 35 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co 35 

Wright, K. T., 4 00 80 



January 13, 1906 CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. Hardware and Metal 



Ash Sifter. 
Cutta, C. M., & Co., Toronto Junction. 

Babbitt Metal. 
Canada Metal Co. , Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co.. Montreal. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Carriage Mounting Co , Toronto. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal. 
Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton Out 
tiutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co. 

Toronto. , 

Sadler & Haworth, Montreal & Toronto. 

Bicycles and Accessories. 

Johnson's. Iver, Arms and Cycle Works 
Fitchburg, Mass 



' Brass Goods. 



Canada Brass Rolling Mills, Toronto. 

Glauber Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lewis, Rice, & Son., Toronto. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 

Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 

United Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

Bronze Powders. 

Thome, R. E., Montreal. 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Brushes. 

Ramsay, A., & Son Co., Montreal. 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co. , Winnipeg. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Frothingham & Workman Co., Montreal. 
Gurney, Tilden Co., Hamilton. 
Howland, H. S., Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 
Lockerby & McComb, Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Newman & Sous, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
PhillipB, ChaB. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smart, James, Mfg. Co., Brockville.Ont. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain. 
Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn. 
Stephens, G. F., Winnipeg. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Winnipeg Ceiling & Roofing Co., Winnipeg 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Larriage Mountings Co., Toronto, 
eovert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Loughead, J. S., & Son, Sarnia, Ont. 

Cattle and Trace Chains. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls. 

Churns. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co.,Nashua,N.H. 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Cordage. 

Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Cork Screws. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Customs Brokers, 

Turnbull& Henderson, Vancouver, B.C. 

Cutlery— Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ottawa. 
Clause Shear Co., Toronto 
Dorken Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, E. F., & Co., Montreal. 

Door Hangers. 

Safety Door Hanger Co., Hamilton, Ont 

Electric Fixtures. 

Canadian Aluminum Works. Montreal. 
Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto. 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh & Co., Montreal. 

Emery Wheel Dresser Cutters. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Emery Wheel Dressers. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. & H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal 

1 Financial Institutions 

Bradstreet Co. 



Fire Brick, Furnace and Store 
Cement, etc. 

Sterne, G. F., & Son. Brantford. 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Claybrough & Johnstone, Birmingham, 

Eng. 
Dominion Cartridge Co.. Montreal. 
Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 
Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 

Worcester, Mass. 
Johnson's, Iver, Arms and Cycle Works, 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Food Choppers 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Galvanizing. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co. 
Toronto. 
Garden & Farm Implements 

Wilkinson Plough Co , Toronto Junction. 
Maple Leaf Harvest Tool Co .Tillsonburg. 

Gas and Acetylene Lamps, 
Mantles, etc. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 

Continental Heat & Lifcht Co., Montreal. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharratt & Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., & Son. London, Eng. 
Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Glue. 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Hack Saws. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 
Gurney, Tilden Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 

Hollow Ware. 

Welsh Tinplate and Metal Stamping 
Co., Llanelly, Wales. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Hot Water Boilers. 

Cluff, R. J., & Co., Toronto. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Dan* Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
North Bros. Mfg. Oo., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 
McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Ladders — Extension. 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Lanterns. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Wright, E. T., 4 Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ottawa. 

Ledgers — Loose Leaf. 

Crain, Rolla L., Co., Ottawa. 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc. 

Gurney, Tilden Co., Hamilton. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Pink, Thos., & Co., Pembroke, Ont. 

Machinery Supplies. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Jardine, A. B., 4 Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., New York. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co.,Ingersoll,Ont. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 

Machines — Power Hack Saw. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Mantles, Grates and Tiles. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents and 
Brokers. 

Gibb, Alexander. Montreal. 
Jenking. A. C & Co., Montreal. 
Rogers, Herbert & Co., London, Eng. 
Thome, R. E., Montreal and Toronto. 

Metals. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto ■ 
David, R. Sullivan, Montreal. 
Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 
Eadie, H. G., Montreal. 
Frothingham & Workman, Montreal. 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Gilbertson., W., Pontardawe, Wales. 
Henderson, J. A., Montreal. 
Ironside, Son ft Co., London, Eng. 



Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto 
Leslie, A. O, & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Samuel, & Oo.. Dudley, Eng. 
Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montrual. 
Morton, B. K., & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 
Saunders, Franklin & Co., Montreal. 
Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Summers, John, & Son. Stalybridge, Eng 
Thompson. B. & S. H. & Co., Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc 

Solarine Company, Chicago. 
Oakey, John, & Sons, Loudon, Eng. 

Mop Wringers and Buckets. 

Eagle Cooperage Works, Circleville, O. 

Nails and Spikes. 

Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes and 
Glass. 

Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., & Co., Montreal. 
Fenner, Fred , & Co., London, Eng. 
Henderson &Potts Co., Montreal. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. O, & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis. Rice & Son, Toronto. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Comeille & Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougallfc Co., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mdis, Montreal, 
yueen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay & Son, Montreal. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Vamish Works 

Windsor, Ont. 
Thome, W. H., St. John, N.B. 
Winnipeg Paintand Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Plumbers' Tools and Supplies. 

Borden Co,, Warren, Ohio. 
Canada Brass Rolling Mill, Toronto. 
Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Glauber Brass Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Jenkins Bros., Boston, Mass. 
Lewis Rice & Son, Toronto. 
Merrell Mfg. Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
Montreal Rolling Mil's Montreal. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Mueller, H., Mfg. Co., Decatur, IU. 
Naturo Co., Salem, N.J. 
Oshawa Steam & Gas Fitting Co.,Oshawa 
Page-Hersey Iron & Tube Co., Guelph. 
Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., Port Hope, 
United Brass Mfg. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Utica Drop Forge & Tool Co., New York. 

Portland Cement. 

Canadian Portland Cement Co., Toronto 

Grey & Bruce Portland Cement Co., 
Owen Sound. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 

Hyde, F., & Co., Montreal. 

Imperial Cement Co., Owen Sound. 

Thompson. B. & S. H. & Co., MontreaL 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Jenking, A. 0., & Co., Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex., & Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle & Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto & Montreal. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Guelph. Ont. 
Winnipeg Paint St Glass Co., Winnipeg. 

Saws. 

Atkins, E. C, & Co., Indianapolis, Ind 

Lewis Bros.. Montreal. 

Spear & Jackson, Sheffield, Eng, 

Saws — Hack. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Saws— Hack Frames. 

Diamond Saw ^Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Saws— Power Hack. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Sa ws — Kitchen. 

Diamond Saw & Stamping Works, Buffalo 

Scales. 

Canadian Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
New Warren Scale Co., Montreal. 



Sewer Pipes. 



Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 



Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Oo. 
Ingersoll, Ont. 



Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., * Co.. Montreal. 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn 

Silverware. 

Round, John, & Son, Sheffield, Eng 

Skates, Etc. 

Fisher, A. I)., Co., Toronto 
Starr Mfg. Co., Dartmouth, N.S. 

Stable Fixtures. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Oneida Community Co., Niagara Falls 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. P., & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K., & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel* Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Storage Warehouse. 
Mackenzie Bros., Winnipeg. 

Stoves and Tinware, Radia- 
tors, Furnaces, etc. 

Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co., 

Owen Sound. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Dieckmann, Ferdinand, Cincinnati. 
Collins Mfg, Co., Toronto. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London, Out. 
Harris, ). W.,Co., Mon.real. 
James & Reid, Perth, Ont. 
Joy Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co. Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co. London 
McLean, Holt&Co., St. John, .\ B 
Metal Stamping Co., Jackson, Mich. 
Moffat Stove Co., Weston, Ont. 
Ottawa Furnace and Fdy. Co., Ottawa. 
Pease Foundry Co., Toronto, 
terfection Safety Fu,naoe Pipe Co., 

Toronto. 
Smart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Brockville, Ont. 
Stewart, Jas., Mfg. Co., Woodstock, Out. 
Taylor-Forbes Co.. Uuelph. Ont. 
Walker Steel Range Co., Grimsby, Out. 
Wright, E. T.,s Co., Hamilton. 

Tacks. 

Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton. 
Peck Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 

Tub Hoops. 

Watt & Squire, Brantford. 

Typewriters and Supplies. 

United Typewriter Co., Montreal. 

Wall Coating. 

Alabastine Co., Paris, Ont. 

Winnipeg Paint & olass Co., Winnipeg. 

Washing Machines, etc 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor ForbeB Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., & Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham & Workman, Montreal. 
Hobbs Hardware Co., London. 
Howland, H. »., Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Kennedy Hardware Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 
Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax, N.S. 

Window and Sidewalk Prisms 

Hobbs Mfg. Co. , London, Ont. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 

Wire Springs. 

Guelph Spring Axle Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Henderson, J. A., Montreal. 
Wallace-Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Cutta, 0. M., Toronto Junction. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal 
Great West Wire Fenoe Co., Winnipeg. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son & Co., London, Eng. 
Montreal Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Muuro Wire Works, Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community. Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Walter, E. F. £ Co., MontreaL 
Western Wire & Nail Co., London, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 
Waggoner Ladder Co., London, Ont. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Alex .,& Oo., Montreal. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



yywww^WWWVWW^^^^^^A^^^^A^AA^^^^^^^^NA^* 



HAS THE RANGE PEDLAR 

invaded your territory yet. If not they are now heading your 
way. You might as well try to " fight fire with fire," as to buck up 
against them with anything but a malleable range. 

THE JOY MALLEABLE AND STEEL RANGE 

s the only one made in Canada that is sold through dealers only. 
Better prepare yourself by securing the agency. 

ALL CORRESPONDENCE PROMPTLY ANSWERED. 

THE JOY MANUFACTURING CO. 

32 William Ave., - - TORONTO 




Our LAWN RAKES are the Bast on Earth. Your stock is not complete 
without them. Also Garden and Weed Hoes, Corn Planters, etc. 




We are the largest manufacturers of Posthole Diggers on earth. 
If interested please write for our Catalogue. 

F. E. KOHLER & CO., Canton, Ohio, U.S.A. 



E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




MILK CANS, 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS, 
SAP BUCKETS, 
SAP SPOUTS, 

DAIRY PAILS, 

STRAINERPAILS.etc. 



METALNOVELTIES AND ADVERTISING UTILITIES 

HERBERT J. RODGERS 

>J Saracen House, Snow Hill, London, E.O., Eng., 
visits Canada in March, representing British Manu- 
facturers of up-to-date metal and aluminum fancy 
photo frames, calendars, match boxes, ash 
iiays. advertising novelties, etc. of high i 
Appointments from Jobbers will be valued. 




Ljo^ia Good Printing Cheap 



THE KIND THAT BRINCS RESULTS 

Just for instance:— 1000 Statements, $1.50; 1000 Bill- 
heads, $1.50; 1000 Letterheads, $2.50; 1000 Enve- 
lopes, $1.25 ; The lot for $6.00. 

G. A. WEESE & SON, Toronto, Ont. 



A WORK INDISPENSABLE TO EVERY OFFICE 



1. Consuls of Foreign States 
in London. 

Consuls of Foreign States in 
Provinces. 
English Consuls abroad. 

2. Chambers of Commerce 
in United Kingdom. 

Chambers of Commerce in 
Colonies. 

3. Customs Tariff of the 
United Kingdom. 

4. Lloyds Signal Stations in 
the United Kingdom. 

Lloyds Agents throughout the 
world (revised by the Secre- 
tary) 



RELIABLE COMPACT EASY OF REFERENCE 

ABSOLUTELY UNSURPASSED FOR GETTING IN TOUCH WITH ALL SHIPPERS, MANUFACTURERS, ETC. 




Export Merchant 
Shippers 

Of GREAT BRITAIN and IRELAND 



Price, 15 J 6 "«*• 
43rd Year of Publication. 



Date of publication of 1906 edition, FEBRUARY 28th 



London: THE CARTER PUBLISHING CO., 



8 New Bridge Street, E. C. 



5. Register of British and 
Foreign Shipping. 

6. Shipping and Forwarding 
Agents, Export Packers, Steam- 
ship Lines. 

7. Export Sections of Lon- 
don and Provinces (separate 
towns), giving names of ex- 
porters, places of shipment, 
and class of goods shipped. 

8. Index to Class of Goods 
Shipped with names of Ship- 
pers. 

9. Trade Mark Section. 

10. Manufacturers' Trade 
Directory (Buyers' Guide.) 



80 



January 13, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BACKED BY A GUARANTEE 



When you deal in ROBERTSON'S 
BABBITS you are protected by the 
guarantee of a firm with many years' 
experience, and a national reputation. 
If you choose any of our standard lines, 
you are 

SURE TO BE SATISFIED 

We absolutely guarantee that our anti- 
friction metals cannot be excelled in 
quality at their respective prices. 
Always look for our registertd trade 
marks. 



WRITE FOR OUR PRICES 

The James Robertson Co. 

LIMITKD 

MONTREAL 

TORONTO 
WINNIPEG 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 



'MONARCH" 

'KING" 

'FLEUR de LIS" 

'THURBER" 

'PHILADELPHIA" 

'CANADIAN" 



|***^** *************************** 

I PFLUEGER'S 

Fishing TacKle 




J HooKs, Flies, 
Trolls, Spin- 
ners, Phan- 
toms, Reels, 

Furn ished 
Lines. 

Everything 
in Fishing 
TacKle. 



NOTICE— Free to Any Dealer in Sporting Goods, 
Sent Express Prepaid, 170-Page. Illustrated Cata- 
logue No. F24, and Metal Fish Sign in 8-Color 
Lithograph. 

The Enterprise Mfg. Co. 

AKRON, Ohio, U.S.A. 



« *?*^**?******** ****?*?************ 




PRESSED, 
STAMPED, and 
MACHINE-MADE 



HOLLOW-WARE 

ENAMELLED, TINNED, GALVANIZED and JAPANNED 

We manufacture every description of Hollow- ware and we guarantee that every piece is made wholly 
on our own premises. Our average weekly capacity, is over 700,000 pieces, of Tinned, Galvanized and 
Enamelled ware. Our Enamelled ware is of superior durability and finish, and is guaranteed free from 
any poisonous substances. 

Let us have your nam. for our Illustrated lists 

The Welsh Tinplate & Metal Stamping Co., Ltd. 

LLANELLY, WALES 




LUFKIN 



MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc. 

ARE THE BE8T AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



London Office and Warehouse— 48 Lime St. 



New York Clty.Branoii— 9 SO Broadway. 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 13, 1906 



"%■-%• ^% -%■■%. ■%^.'% ■%•%■■% •«v%'%/%^%^ '%'%'%'%'"%''%'%'» 



K»t. MM 




Inc. ISM. 



.. 



Redstone 



ff 



Black Diamond File Works j 

G. & H. Barnett Company \ 

PHILADELPHIA f 

Medals |! 



Twelve 



PHILADELPHIA 




J 



Awarded 
By JURORS »t| 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 

Copy of cata- 
logue sent tree 
to any inter- 
ested file user 
upon applica- 
tion. 

WALTER G "^^"*^^"^Ji£" * 



High Pressure 

Sheet Packing 



A packing that will hold. For use in highest 

pressures for steam, hot or cold water and air. 

i 
Packs equally well for all. 

From actual tests, we believe that this pack- 
ing is the most durable and satisfactory of any on 
the market. Try a sample lot and see for yourself. 



Manufactured Solely by 




THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

of TORONTO, LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES, 

47 Yonge Street, Toronto. 

Branches : Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



"COMET" 



Belgian Window Class, SI 

Billets 

Colored and Fancy Class 

Frosted Class 

Chances' Figured Rolled, 

Muffled and Cathedral Class 

We are prepared to name you low 
prices and discounts on your require- 
ments. Write us with your specifications. 



B.&S.H.THOMPSON&C0. 



SADLER ft ll/IW9RTn 



When a 
Leather Belt 

is not satisfactory it is a 
costly nuisance. You can't 
afford to make mistakes. 
You run no risk when you 
buy our brands. 



Extra 
Diamond 



Standard 
Agricultural 



LIMITED 



53 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL 



Montreal, T0f-ot\\o. 



CIRCULATES EVERYWHERE IN CANADA 

Alio in Grut Britain. United States. 'West Indies. SoutK Africa end Australia. 

HARDWAM»METAL 

A "WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tKe Hardware, Metal, Heating and 

Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVIII. 



MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG, JANUARY 20, 1906 



NO. 3 




"\A TRADt J4^ MARK $ 



\ 



\CUTLERY5 



,5- 



For Sale by leading Wholesale Hardware Houses. 



BEST STEEL SHEETS 

"QUEEN'S HEAD"— softest and flattest made 

"SOUTHERN CROSS" - Dead flat, quality 
guaranteed 

Also, good merchant quality, 
open and close annealed. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited. Makers, 
BRISTOL, ENG. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL, 
Managers Canadian Branch. 



Oct Tbc Best Tree Pruners 
and you will get the best Custom 

Now is the time to think about ordering 

Tree Primers 

« 

and you want to be sure that you get the "WATER" PATTERN, which is un- 
doubtedly the leading model. 

We are always particular about material. We make the Handles of our 
"Water" Pattern out of Hard Maple; the Head is made of Malleable Iron; the 
Knives are Sheffield Steel; the Rod is of 3-16 Coppered Wire; the Lever is 
Malleable Iron with Polished Wood Handle. 

Sizes : 6, 8, 10. 12 feet. Packed V2 doz. in bundle. Shipping Weights : 22, 24, 26, 32 lbs. 

See your Jobber, and if he cannot supply you, write us direct. 

Taylor -Forbes Company, 

THE LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF HARDWARE IN CANADA 




Limited 



Branch : 
21 Richmond St. W., Toronto, Ont. 



Head Office and Works : 
Cuelph, Ont. 



Branch : 
9 De Bresoles St., Montreal, Que. 



See C/assiffed List of Advertisements on Page 71. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



LUMBERMAN l oqLS 




KETURNED 

BOLTS STEEL TIMBER GAUGES SAWS 

NAILS hi^^B^^^ JVXES 
WASHERS 



FILES 




HICKORY BOARD RULES 



RETURNED 



LOG RULES JAN 22.1906 



HORSE 
SHOES 




TRACE CHAINS 



CHAIN 





CHAIN 



KNOCK DOWN CHAIN FOR RAFTING 



t \0 



C^&^? BOOM CHAINS 

iP-^AlT>fees furnished with all styles of hooks, also with toggle and ring. 
WRITE ^^0* PRICES 




RICE LEWIS 




SON 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 









WH 


Browning Automatic Shot Gun 

Also 

Full line of Single and Double- 
Barrel Breech Loading Guns, 






WHISK HOLDERS 

ARE A GOOD LINE- 
EVEN IF YOU DO NOT 
STOCK OUR REGULAR 

BATH ROOM FIXTURES 

IT WILL DO YOU NO 
HARM TO HAVE OUR 
CATALOG "B" ANYWAY 

The Carriage Mountings Co., Ltd. 

TORONTO 




Winchester, Savage and Marlin 
Sporting Rifles 

in all models. 

Shot and Ball Cartridges 

in 

Smokeless and Black Powder. 


THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMITED 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF HARDWARE 

OTTAWA, ONT. 












CEM" 



BLIZZARD' 






mRCCT IPC PDEAM EDEE7EDQ ln P racti c al u»e, because convenien t 
DCOI lUL OnLAITI rnLLlXnO compact in size, use smallest amount o 
Ice and gait, run easily, freeze quickly, produce smoothly frozen creams or dessert 
with little bother and less work. 

THE ONLY FREEZERS (1ADE having Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms, Automatic Tin Scraper*. 



(I 



AMERICAN" 

TWIN FREEZERS 



(2 in I) 



Freezes two flavors of Ice Cream or an Ice or Sherbet 
and Ice Cream at one and same time, in one Freezer 
Something: entirely new. Never done before. 

ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR THEM. 
SEND FOR NEW FREEZER BOOK. 

NORTH BROS. fflFG. CO. 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




'LIGHTNING" "CROWN 

ICE CHIPPER* 

1 



"CEM" 
ICE SHAVE 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20. 1906 



Davidson's Milk Can Trimmings 




and Milk Cans with Broad Hoop 
Patent Roll Rim Bottoms 

arc in great demand and their 
general popularity is increasing 
yearly. 

They give satisfaction to users 
and dealers alike. 



IN COMPLETE SETS 

"Broad Hoop' Pattern — Com- 

fosed of the following : 1 Broad 
loop Bottom, 1 Cover, 1 Centre 
Hoop (> inches wide. '.'(I gauge. 1 
Broad Top Hoop. 1 pair Cover 
Handle-.. 1 pair Side Handles. 



IMPORTANT 

The best mechanical skill ob- 
tainable is utilized to make David- 
son's Milk Can Trimmings perfect 
in even the smallest details. 

Write for Price List. 




Heavy Rolled Edges make our Patent Bottoms doubly- 
durable and waggon and factory floor protectors. 



Some customers do not like to send 
us small orders. That's a mistake. 

We take them, large or smail. We 
are waiting for your order now. 



THE THOS. DAVIDSON MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

Montreal and Winnipeg 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Go 

have removed their offices and 
warehouse to 54-56-58 Front West. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Go 



N 



English Hou»«-l6 Philpot lino, LONDON, ENGLAND 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



65 YEARS' EXPERIENCE 



1840 



IN MAKING SAWS 



1906 



TRADE 



MARK 




RN! 



Henry Disston, the founder of the establishment of Henry 
Disston & Sons, Inc., began making saws in 1*40. 

After repeated unsuccessful efforts to pro ure steel of the de- 
sired quality, this firm, in 1855, erected a crucible steel plant 
expressly adapted to the manufacture of Saw Steel. Constant 
efforts and unlimited expenditure of time and money enabled them 
to procure the steel, which for general excellence has established an enviable and world-wide reputation. 

The steel being of uniform grade insures a uniform temper in the saws, which in connection with the 
system of hammering, grinding and tensioning employed, the most skillful mechanics in all branches, tem- 
pering facilities exclusively their own, a shop equipped with the finest machinery and determination to spare 
no necessary expense to make perfect saws, has gained for saws bearing the name " Disston" the reputation 
of being the best in the world. 

" Disston" Saws and our prices make a tough proposition for a competitor to run up against. 






No. 08. -SKEW BACK, MADE IN 
HAND, RIP AND PANEL 




li'lM! 1 !! ■' 



No. 12 STRAIGHT BACK, HAND, 
RIP AND PANEL 




MsWWWHW^ 




ETURNE 
M 22 /90, 



;;iJS.i^i!k ~ SEiS; « Xffi^KWwui;™«u ' 



LEWIS BROS., Ltd 



OTTAWA 
TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



na/iimimif>e:g 



VANCOUVER 
OAL-QARV 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 




Pirvlr*c MADE IN Canada 

Lumbering 
Tools 

THE STANDARD TOOLS 

in every Province of the Dominion, New 

Zealand, Australia, Etc. 
Wc manufacture all kinds of Lumber Tools 

Pink's Round Bill Peavys, Handled in Split Maple 
Pink's Duck Bill Winter Cant Hooks, Handled In 

Split Maple. 
Finest Quality Split Maple Cant Hook and Peavy 

Handles, Car Load or Dozen. 
Boom Chains, Pike Poles, Skidding Tongs, Boat 

Winches, etc. 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail 
Hardware Merchants. 

I Can Furnish You with the 

Brazil Patent Snow Plough and Road Maker; 
also The OesJardin Patent Log Sleighs 



"Zltixsr THOMAS PINK & CO., Pembroke, Ont, Canada 



Long Distance 
Phono No. 87 



John Summers & Sons, Limited 



Hawardcn Bridge Works, 
Shotton, Flintshire, England 




These two Works cover more than 50 acres. Our output of Galvanized Sheets exceeds 2,000 tons weekly, and we employ over 2,500 men. 




LARGEST 
MAKERS 
OF 



GALVANIZED SHEETS 

<mm—— IN ENGLAND 

One year's production from these works 
& f N M * v < would put a girdle of Galvanized Sheets 

^£ST 8^- right around the earth. 

Agent: F. Hankin, Montreal 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canada Leads the World in the Manufacture of 

HIGH-CLASS SAWS 




W- 



rg&fi, 



No. 81. 



The best and cheapest Hand Saw on the market, quality, temper and finish con- 
sidered. Every saw warranted. Carved applewood handle. Patented, Wave finish blade. 




No. 1 Maple Leaf Lance Tooth Cross-Cut Saw, and No Racer are tempered 
under our secret process. 




No. O Narrow Racer Cross Cut Saw 



If you want saws that will sell and give your customer satisfaction, you will stock 
the Maple Leaf Saws. 



Manufactured 
by 



SHURLY & DIETRICH, 



GALT, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



An Absolutely Sealed Packing Case 




ARE YOU TROUBLED BY CLAIMS FOR GOODS 
BEING LOST OR STOLEN IN TRANSIT ■£> ^> 

THIS METHOD IS A SURE CURE 

Recommended by the Railroads in Canada and U. S. 



J. N. WARMINTON, 



43 Scott St., TORONTO 

207 St. James St., MONTREAL 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND SAMPLES 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

21 State Street. 



Montreal 

Bank of Ottawa Building:. 



Chicago 

The Rookery. 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



^ 



S"t tRE ? TRA °f Af 



€DG3@ 




*a 



*s 



€BGQ@ 



ESTABLI SHED 1847 

Silversmiths and Cutlers 



Contractors to H.M. Admiralty and War Office. Factories : SHEFFIELD, England 

JOHN ROUND & SON 



Coristine Building, MONTREAL 



LIMITED 



Superior High Grade Cutlery 

Our celebrated cutlery is known throughout the world. 
Everywhere it is acknowledged the Best. "We have a great 
range of Carvers and Combination Sets to select from. 

Our prices are right. 

Quality 



Style 

Workmanship 

Prices 



(Are our 
watchwords) 





28414. CARVING SET 



28910 
12 PAIRS DESSERT KNIVES AND FORKS 

Pearl HANDLES. Quartered Oak Case. 



Dessert Knives and Forks in cases of 6, 12 and 18 pairs. Pearl handles and best 
quality plated blades. We illustrate one of our leaders. Send us your enquiries. They will 
receive prompt attention. 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THEY SAW IT 



Four large manufacturing 
firms replied last week to 
a condensed advertisement 
which occupied about half an 
inch of space and cost about 
fifty cents. Manufacturers 
and retail merchants read the 
paper minutely each week. 

Think of being able to 
talk each week to practically 
every man that sells or makes 
Hardware in Canada. No 
other paper can carry your 
message to this class of 
people. 

RATES : payable in advance. 
2c. per word for first insertion, 
lc. " " subsequent insertions. 



HARDWARE™ METAL 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG 



*£ TftEE BBAID C-Ut USY 




OAK-CABINET 

Given away FREE of charge with an order for six 

half-dozen Pocket Knives, as illustrated above. 

May be had through all leading wholesale hardware firms. 



Here Is A Seller! 

You can sell a pair of S. & S. Cogged Scissors to 
every one in your town who works with such materials as 
eather, rubber, packing:, linoleum and asbestos. 

The lower blade is cogged, thus holding the material 
jn place for the sharp upper blade to cut it. 



Canadian Agents 



McLEAN & SOPIUIS, 301 St. James Street, MONTREAL 




FURS ARE VALUABLE 



Don't allow your catch to escape because 
caught in a poor trap. GENUINE NEWH0U8E 
trap will hold the game and earn its extra 
cost several times in a season. 




Newhouse Steel Traps 

ARE ABSOLUTELY GUARANTEED 
Made Since 1848 by 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 



Write for Catalogue 



NIAGARA FALLS, Oni. 



i 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



Canada Horse Nail Company. 



(S 33 *^)^!? 5 **!-?) 



HARDWARE TRADE PRICE LIST. 



THE 



c 



BRAND RETUBNE.° 
906V 8I9«*. 



HORSE SHOE I^AILS 

Hot Forged from Swedish Ghar&alt/Stee 








Revised 


List 


adopted 


January 


— b 

1st, 


190^ 


n 


' 14 


Size No. 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


\% 


Length 


If 


2 


2* 


H 


2| 


H 


2| 


2| 


2* 


3* in. 


Per lb. 


40 


32 


28 


26 


24 


22 


20 


20 


20 


20 cts. 


Per Box 810.00 


8.00 


7.00 


6.50 


6.00 


5.50 


5.00 


5.00 


5.0( 


I 5.00 



Iu boxes of 25 lbs. each ; either loose, or in 5 lb. cardboard packages. 
In one pound cardboard packages, an extra charge of £c. per lb. net. 
Oval and Countersunk patterns; Sizes No. 4 to No. 14. 
Short Oval and Short Countersunk patterns : Sizes No. 1 to No. 8. 

TURF NAILS. 

For Racing Plates, and Light Trotting Shoes. 



Size No. 1 
Length \\ 
Per lb. 82.00 




EXTRA SELECTED. 



Short Oval and Short Countersunk Patterns. 
In one pound cardboard Packages only. 



PATTERNS AND SIZES. I 

Oval Head. Short Oval. 




Nos. 4 to 14. 
Countersunk Head. 



Nos. 1 to 8. 
Short Countersunk. 




hos. 5 to 12. 



Nos. 1 to 8. 



TERMS AND CONDITIONS: 

DELIVERY : Free on board cars or boat at Montreal. 

Freight equalized from Factory points of St. John, N.B., and Toronto, Ont. 

TERMS OF SALE : Cash 30 days, less 2% discount; all accounts to be settled foi 
by acceptance or remittance within 30 days from 1st of month following sale. 

TRADE DISCOUNT: 40 and 10 and 7|% from List prices. 



Canada Horse Nail Company. 



Montreal, January 1st, 1906. 



Cancelling all previous List prices and quotations. 

8 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

tHSP Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

v For Sale by all Wholeaale Dealan. 



GET THE HABIT 

of dropping us a card a few days 
before you start for Montreal or 
Toronto on a business trip tell- 
ing us where you are going to 
stay. We want to print it In the 
" Buyers In Town " department 
before you arrive. v» >^» ^» 



CARRIAGE 
SPRINCS& AXLES 
ANCHOR 
BRAND 



THE CUELPH SPRING & AXLE CO. 

LIMITED 
CUELPH, ONT. 




To 

Manufacturers' 



Hardware and 
Metal has in- 
quiries from time 
to time from 
manufacturers 

AlT6IltS an( * otnerswan t- 

O ing representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




KENWOOD 

DESIGN 



B 

U 

I 

L 
D 
E 
R 

S 



H 
A 
R 
D 
W 
A 
R 
E 



Kenwood Inside Set 



Kenwood 
Store Door Set 



1AH i\ 



A NEAT CLEAN DESIGN 

VERY LOW IN PRICE 
IN OLD COPPER OR DULL BRASS FINISH 




o 





Kenwood Front Ooor 

Set 

with Plain Bitted 

Keyed Lock 

or with 

Cylinder Lock 



"Kenwood" 
Hardware 

SELLS ITSELF. 

IT WILL PLEASE 
YOUR PARTICULAR 
CUSTOMERS WHO 
DESIRE SOME- 
THING ATTRAC- 
TIVE THAT IS SOLD 
ATA REASONABLE 
PRICE. 

JUST WRITE TO- 
DAY FOR PRICES. 



Wholesale 
Distributors 

OF KENWOOD 
GOODS 




AND 



OF 

MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



We manufacture Cordage and Binder Twine of every variety. 
We solicit your 1906 business for the following brands: 

Blue Ribbon, 650 ft per lb. 
Red Cap, 600 " 

Tiger, 550 " 

Standard, 500 " 

Golden Crown, 500 " 

Consumers Cordage Co., 



MILLS: nONTREAL and HALIFAX 



Limited 



BRANCHES: 



W. A. C. HAMILTON, 11 Front Street East, Toronto, Ont.; F. H. ANDREWS & SON, Quebec, P.Q.; 

MacOOWAN & CO., Vancouver, B.C.; CONSUMERS CORDAGE CO., Limited, St. John, N.B.; GEO. WOOD, London, Eng. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., Winnipeg Distributors of our Binder Twine for Northwest. 



♦ 






>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



►►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




The Very Newest 

Combination, Bow Lever and Side Pedal drive ; oper- 
ated from a sitting or standing position. Bicycle Ball 
Bearings. Very easy running. Barrel quickly detachable 
from frame. 



Stylo "F" 



The Best Ever 

Easiest running and highest 
grade Rotary Washer made. 

Test proves best. Try it and 
profit. Nothing like it on the 
market. 

Gears enclosed. Impossible for 
children to get their fingers caught. 



THESE ARE TRADE B RINGERS 




THE "SNOWBALL" 



Made solely by 



* L HA Mo D Mm N A?, * S0M ' THE D0WSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

Eastern Agents HAMILTON, - ONTARIO 

10 



January W, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Established 1774 



Established 1774 



We are "old" in experience, "young" in method. "We rivet our 
attention on "make" and "material," the combination that 
produces the unrivalled 

SPEAR & JACKSON HANDSAWS 



£*&& *£** 




Our Circular Saws, too, are made in a " telling" way, in all sizes 
and for all purposes. We'll stand comparison on the price ques- 
tion. Look into our goods. Correspondence with this house 
will benefit you — your business. 

SPEAR & JACKSON ffi Sheffield, England 

Telegraphic address : " Spear, Sheffield " 



Push = = 



Our Advertising Department is giving valuable service 
free to dealers who are pushing ENTERPRISE goods. 
We not only advertise to the public generally all over the 
world, but we also otherwise help aggressive dealers 
especially to increase sales of 




T=7 




ENTERPRISE 

Meat Choppers, Food Choppers, Coffee Mills, Bone 
Mills, Meat Juice Extractors, Etc. 

If you want to sell MORE, drop a line now to our 
Advertising Manager. Tell him what lines you want jto 
push and ask for help. It costs you nothing. It benefits 
us both. Get in the " push " and keep pushing. 

THE ENTERPRISE MFG. CO. OF PA. 

Philadelphia, U.S.A. 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 




WRAPPING PAPERS 

ALL GRADES, AND BEST OF EACH 

GREY. RED-BrtOWN, MANILLA, F1BR:<;, TEA, ETC. 

Canada Paper Co, 



SAMPLES AND 

PK1CKM 

FOR THB ASKING 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK F '? NC F E *s 



FOR FASTENING WOODEN PICKET ON WIRF 




WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL OO., Limited, 



-LONDON, ONT 




ESTABLISHED 1867 

J. S. LOUGHEAD & SON, Sarnia, Ont. 

Mfrs. of Hubs, Spokes, Buggy and Waggon Rims, Sleigh Runners, 
Shafts and Poles, etc. 

We use nothing but the very best Hickory and 
Oak in our stock, and we are prepared to 
guarantee all of our goods. We carry an ex- 
ceedingly large stock on hand and will ship 
promptly. 

Your Order Solicited. 

Quebec Agent:— J. A. BERNARD, 
21 St. Peter St., Quebec, P.Q. 



Deal^s-- r "CLABROUGH" 

SHOT GUNS for next Season's Trade 



THEY SHOOT WELL ! 

THEY SELL WELL ! 

THE PROFITS ARE RIGHT ! 

Sole Manufacturers — 

J. P. CLABROUGH & JOHNSTONE 

WORKS- 

Price Street, BIRMINGHAM, ENC. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 




Capital and Surplus. 91,500,000. Offioei Throughout the Civ'lized World. 

Exeoutive Offioes : Kos. 346 and 848 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circuinsiauces of every t-ee&er o mercant le credit. Its business nmy be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information nc 
effort is spared, and no reasonable exp- nse considered too great, that the results may justify its clnim as ar 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantilecredit. Its offices and connections rmve 
been bteadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

8uo«criptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporation*. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of iis office*. Cdrreipondsnce Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



Halifax. n a. 

OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANOODVEE, B.O. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE 



LONDON, ONT. 
BT. JOHN, N.B, 
WINNIPEG, MAIL 



MONTREAL, QOX. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



MEND YOUR OWN BOOTS, 
HARNESS, ETC. 

"ALL-U-WANT." 





SOLE A0ENT5 

AWL-U-WANT CO. 

79 East Front St. TORONTO 



SWEAT PADS 

SEND FOR SAMPLES AND PRICES 

HORSE BLANKETS 

Balance of stock clearing at reduced prices. 

H. F. FALKINER 

58-60 CE0RCE ST., - TORONTO. 



TH0S. C. IRVING, G« Mai. W«tt.n Otuda. Toroito. 



H. G. EADIE 



22 St. John St., 



Montreal 



Manufacturer's Agent, Hardware and Metal Merchant 

Representing' Canadian British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence Invited from 
firms wUhing to be represented. Representing 
now 

LEEDS FIRE CLAY CO., Lt'd. 

Fire Bricks, Glazed Bricks, Stable Bricks. 

T. JO WITT & SONS, SHEFFIELD. 

Files, Cast Steel, Hammers, Crucible Steel Wire. 

JOS. FENTON & SONS, SHEFFIELD 

Cutlery and Plated Ware. 

Agent for 

Norway Iron, Steel, Calvanized Iron, Chains, 

Sheet Iron, Hoop Iron, Machinery 

Steel, PEN-DAR Metal Lockers. 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 



Every Canadian who wishes to Irade 
successfully with the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address Is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage. $4.80. ) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the ru'es. 



tW\ 


A Popular, Profit- 
able and Seasonable 
Lirie to Handle. 


1L 


Dennis' 


flexible Steel Wire 




* Door Mats 


DENNIS WIRE AND IRON WORKS CO., umited 


Sen) for Catalogue, 


LONDON, ONT 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in Hardware and Metal. 



12 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THIS IS THE 

OLD STAND-BY 



NO. 233.-WILCOX TACKLE-BLOCK WIRE STRETCHER 



.,-^' s 



None better on the mar- 
ket unless it is the 
Triumph. 
If your Jobber cannot 
supply, write us for 
prices. 

WILCOX IVIF-Q. CO. OF" ONTARIO, l_ 




ited, London, Ont. 



>^^^^^*VW W WWWMWW^^^^^^A^^^^^^^V^^V**VM^V^ ^ ^^^^^^^^^^^A»*^^A^^^^A^^^'V^ 



Your Responsibility 



r 



In the relation of seller to user is an important 
one. Your customer is probably your neigh- 
bor and friend and he looks to you for goods 
that are right. He expects you to give him his 
money's worth. When you handle the Atkins 
Celebrated Silver Steel Saws you feel secure in 
the knowledge that you are selling the finest goods it is possible to obtain in the Saw line. Are you selling them? If not 
NOW is a good time to make a change for the better. Write for Catalogue and Discounts. 







E. C. ATKINS & CO., 



INCORPORATED 



Leading Saw and Tool Manufacturers 
Factories and Home Office . . . 



Indianapolis, Ind., U.S.A. 



CANADIAN BRANCH : 56 King St. E., Toronto, Can. NORTHWESTERN BRANCH : Minneapolis, Minn. 



DOMINION WIRE MANUFACTURINGS 



MONTREAL 



AND 



TORONTO 



LIMITED 



BARB WIRE «nd PLAIN GALVANIZED WIRE 

BRIGHT AND GALVANIZED FENCE STAPLES 



WIRE NAILS 



FLAT HEAD 
ROUND and OVAL HEAD 



BRIGHT— BRASS 
BRIGHT and BRASS 



SCREWS 

TINNED WIRE for Mattress, Broom, Bottling and Binding 
STEEL WIRE BARREL HOOPS 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE 



ALL MADE IN CANADA 

13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 26, i&06 



A POINTED TALE 

)!ViNEl5 REO DEVIL WATER MOTOR- • 




Attached to any faucet. 
Most powerful of its size. 
Gives 's li.p. on 80 lbs. pressure. 
"),000 revolutions per minute. 
GrinJ an axe on -20 lbs. pressure. 

Powerful— Practical Perfect 

Polishes Silverware and Other Metals. 
Grinds Knives and Other Edged Tools. 
Runs Sewing and Other Small Machines. 
Most Useful Article in the World. 

PRICE, including faucet connection, 
emen , buffing and pulley wheels, 
polishing composition, etc., $4,00, 
complete. 

This ad. and $3.50 will get the Motor 
complete. 

Divine Water Motor Co. 

296 Broadway, New York 

ALLEN C. JENKING & CO., Room 215 CorisTine Bldg.. MONTREAL 
Stock carried in Montreal. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers of 
Set and Cap 8crews, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc Cold Punched Nuti of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



Genuine pratts Astral Lamp Oil 

Sold in all countries and recognized as the highest grade oil manufactured. 
WHOLESALE ONLY 
THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY, Limited, - TORONTO, ONT 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KISftEfiUT *"**" n 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

•' QUALITY UHQTJ F.STION ED 
Each pair of our shears bears tb- above trade mark. 



T^ 



Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS', BARBERS' 
ur.d TAILORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 

Henry T. Seymour Shear Company 

WIEBUSCH & HiLOER. Llmitad, NEW YORK, Sol* Ag»nta 

14 




Latest Cata 
logue will be 

sent iii 

exchange for 

your business 

card. 



PRICE and QUALITY 

arc i wo vital elements in 

OILBERT^SON^ 

c omeT~~ 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 

That means they are soft, smooth, and easily 
worked, that they are flat, well galvanized and 
that they are lower in price than other high 
grade brands. 

MAKERS: 

W. GILBERTSON & CO., Limited. 

PONTARDAWE, SOUTH WALES. 

Bolton, Fane & Go. 

98 Leadenhall Street, London, E.G., Eng. 

TINPLATES 

In all qualities and sizes 

Bessemer Coke ... " Lofoden " Brand 
Seimens Coke - - - "Pelican" Brand 

Charcoal .... "Mocha" Brand 

Best Charcoal - - " Cardigan " Crown Brand 

Staffordshire Bar Iron - - B.G. Crown Brand 

Calvanized Sheets "Pelican" and "Ostrich" Brand 

Boiler Plates, Rails, Fishplates, &c, &c. 
R. SULLIVAN DAVID 

Selling Agent for Canada, 210 St. James St., MONTREAL 

TELEPHONE, MAIN 3389 



WORK AND 
PRICES -■-/! 
RIGHT. ,aMIZJ 




i« 


ftVr n w 


IND 


Gi 


l*,l>* ENGINE & PUMP CO, 

TORONTO, ONT. LIMITED.] 



GAPS 

the: CANADA METAL CO. 

TOPONTO, ONTARIO. 



Maple Leaf 

Stitched Cotton Duck 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co Ltd 

Hamilton Canada 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware and metal 



WIRE ROPE 




"ACME" brand 

Highest grade of hoisting 
rope made. 

Extra tensile strength for 
heavy work. 

One strand painted green, look for it. 



Use Greening's Rope Grease for lubrication. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, P.Q. 




*£ Australasian «£ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



post free to any part of the world 

PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, • . 
BRITISH OPFICES : 

London, - .' 42 Cannon St.,E.C 
CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will reeeire prompt 
attention If addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 
STREET, E.C. 

Specimen Copies Fret en Application- 



IRON 



Bars In Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half-Ovals, Half -Rounds and 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

GOOD QUALITY. PROflPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



STEEL 



Brass and Copper Pipe 

Our Stock comprises 
BRASS : ^-in. to 3-in. in Iron Pipe sizes 
COPPER: ys-'m. to 2-in. " 
All orders shipped promptly. Correspondence solicited 

WM. STAIRS, SON & MORROW, Limited, HALIFAX, N.S 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



THE SUCCESS OF 



"DOMINION" 

Cartridges and Shot Shells 

IS DUE TO 

The use of the best material obtainable. 

Eighteen years experience. 

A most thorough and perfect system of inspection. 

Constant effort to improve quality. 

Determination that every cartridge shipped will do us credit. 



DOMINION CARTRIDGE COMPANY, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS 

MONTREAL 



Send for Price List 



HHM ttMltH M M HHH » MM H ♦++♦ ♦ M ♦ ♦ <+♦++♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

KEMP'S Factory Milk Can Trimmings 




With roll rim bottoms are the kind 
that stand the wear and tear. 

They are made to last 



t 



All sizes of tinned iron In stock. 
We can ship promptly. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO 

$ THE KEMP MFG. CO. OF MONTREAL THE KEMP MFG. AND METAL CO., Limited 

58 McGill St., Montreal, Que. McDermot Ave. East, Winnipeg, Man. 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware and Meta. 




Continuing the investigation into the 
charges againsl the tack manufacturers 

last Thursday afteri t, Mr. Curry 

briefly detailed some agreements and let- 
ters pertaining to those agreements 
which he intended to put in as evidence. 
these agreements being- contained in the 
minutes, and the members apparently 
signing their names to agreements made 
i early every time the prices were alter- 
ed in any way. The Montreal Rolling 
Mills, Peek, Benny & Co., Pillow & Her- 
sey Manufacturing Co., W. T. Woodall, 
and the Ontario Tack Co., all signed 
agreements on Jan. 1, 1900, to the ef- 
fect that a certain list of purchasers on 
hardware list of the association were 
allowed a certain rebate of 12 1-2 
per cent. 

On October 5, 1899, it was resolved 
thai the net extra on galvanized tacks 
be altered from 2 1-'-! to 5c. per. .pound, 
subject to quantity rebates. An agree - 
I to this effect was signed .by the 
Ontario Tack Co., Peck, Benny & Co., 
and the Pillow-Hersey Manufacturing 
Co. 

A letter was read from the Ontario 
Tack Co. to Jenkins & Hardy, suggest- 
ing that they should be allowed to quote 
L2& per pound for an inquiry for 400 
6-oz. papers of harvesting tacks. 

An agreement was drawn up to the 
effect that all inquiries received by any 
member of the association be submitted 
to the other members before the mem- 
ber receiying the inquiry be at liberty 
to quote. This agreement was signed 
i,\ the Peck, Benn^ Co., the Pillow-Her- 
sej Co., and the Montreal Rolling Mills. 

'.Air. Curry (showing Mr. -Frame a 
paper): "What is this?" 

Mr. Frame "A typewritten document, 
being the discount list for Canada of the 
Atlas Tack Co." 

Mr. Curry: "Where did you get it .' " 

Mr. Frame: "1 do not know." 

(Mr. Currv: "How much did you paj 
for ii .'•' 

Mr. Frame's answer was inaudible. 

Magistrate Denison (reading the paper 

,, bad been handed to him): "The 

discount in one case is SO per cent., 12 

1-2 | er eent., 5 per cent, and 30 per cent. 

Mi-. Tilley: "According to Mr. Curry, 
the purchaser of the association's g- ods 
in some cases would be paid .to take them 
away." 

Mr. Curry: "To the uninitiated it 
might appear to be a minus quantity, 
They might take the sum of all the dis- 
( ounts off at once." 

The Atlas Tack Co. allowed the 

St to St. John, Halifax. Montreal. 

Hamilton, and London, on all deliveries 

of 300 pounds and over, and equalized 

the freight rates on other points. 

It will be remembered that the Atlas 
Tack Co. was the United States competi- 



tor with which the association appears 
to have had a good deal of trouble. In 
consequence of their competition, it was 
agreed to reduce the price of lasting 
tacks to shoe manufacturers. 

Various Agreements Made. 

All the manufacturers signed an agree- 
ment in 1895, apparently owing bo 
competition of the above company to 
sell green tufting buttons at an open 
price. 

Agreements with regard to the price 
of brass shoe rivets and the Ontario 
Tack Co.*s price to Aarons & Co. were 
also referred to. 

(The following- jobbers signed an agree 
meiit with the association: P. D. Dods 
>x ( o. : Stewart & Wood ; ( i. F. Stephens 
& Co.; F. Harris Co.; Stevens Bros., 
Ottawa: William Howell: George How- 
ell- Walter Haddon & Co.; A. Ramsav 
& Son: McArthur, Corneille & Co.; Hill 
& Forbes, and others. Another agree- 
ment arranged to allow the Toronto 
Plate Glass Co. a discount of 12 1-2 per 
cent off the face of the invoice. 

Before the Portland Rolling Mills 
were again admitted into the associa- 
tion (in 1S94) they had to forward to 
the secretary a list of their unfilled 
orders. 

Mr. Curry questioned Mr. Frame as to 
a confidential list of booked orders found 
amongst the association papers and in- 
quired why the T. Eaton Co.. the In- 
tercolonial Railway, the Kennedy Hani 
ware Co, Asher & Son. and the Robert 
Simpson Co. 2'ot no discount on their 
purchases, whilst Asher & Leeson were 
allowed 12 1-2 per cent and 10 per cent., 
and Adam Bros, were allowed 5 per 
cent. These were all said to be yearly 
contracts. 

In October. 1900, Jenkins & Hardy 
wrote to the Montreal Rollins: Mills, in- 
forming them that owing- to the low Am- 
erican juices, there was to be an extra 
allowance of 12 1-2 per cent, on up- 
holsterer's tacks. 

Trade Differences. 

Mr. Curry asked Mr. Frame who Mr. 
I tipple was. Mr. Frame said that he 
was the representative of Jenkins & 
Hardy ai Montreal. In November, 1900, 
Mr. Dipple wrote to Jenkins & Hardy 
from Montreal, saying that he wired 
them what price the Pillow-Hersey Co. 
should quote the Grand Trunk Railway 
for tacks in papers. /As Jenkins & 
I la nly had not replied to his telegram, 
he had advised the Pillow-Hersey Co. 
to quote, allowing the same discount as 
if the order were to be in bulk. He had 
also arranged with all the other manu- 
facturers to quote the same price as 
the Pillow-Hersev Co. The inquiry was 
for 720 |, pit- of (in,, pound each. The 

17 



disaount \'w bulk order.- was 85 per cent., 
12 1-2 per cent., 12 1-2 per cent., 2 1 2 

per cent, and •"> per cent, off t lie lac 

the invoice. 

The Pillow-llei>c\ Co. wrote to the 
secretary with reference to their allow 
ance to Messrs. Challan, of Kingston, of 

~ 1 2 per cent. Thev thought that they 
were entitled to it. 

/The Peek, Benny Co. wrote to the sec- 
retary with reference to an al 
breach of the association agreement bj 
the Ontario Tack Co., saying that in 
their opinion the situation was one call- 
ing- for an affidavit by Mr. Whitton. 
'I he secretary of the association replied 
explaining the situation, and referring to 
a previous letter on the same subject, 
adding that if the matter was not now 
perfectly clear to the Peck, Benny Co., 
they would call on Mr. Whitton for an 
affidavit. 

In November, 1000, Mr. Brymer wrote 
to the secretary informing him that the 
Maritime Nail Co. were selling tacks at 
7 1-2 per cent, less than the association 
price, and were doing a good business. 

At this time several firms wrote to 
Jenkins & Hardy, petitioning- them to 
establish a price which would protect 
the consumer and at the same time to 
arrange for the protection of the manu- 
facturer. Jenkins & Hardy replied that 
these propositions clashed, and that 
they could not do what Avas proposed. 

Mr. Curry also read a letter from 
Messrs. Lewis Bros. & Co. to Jenkins & 
Hardy, asking them what their decision 
was with regard to their application for 
a loyalty rebate on horseshoes, horse 
nails and small goods. They informed 
them that when they were purchasing 
from the Maritime Nail Co. (which was 
in competition with the association) they 
were not members of the association. ' ■ 

Some correspondence was read be- 
tween the secretary and the Ontario 
Tack Co., with regard to the Williams 
Sine Co.. of Brantford. It appears that 
the re] resentative of the Ontario Tack 
Co. hail promised the Williams Shoe Co. 
a rebate "f 5 per cent, on a purchase 
of tacks. The Williams Co. seem not to 
have understood anything' about mak- 
ing- a declaration before receiving- the 
rebate, and Jenkins & Hardy wrote to 
the Ontario Tack Co. insisting- that be- 
fore the discount could lie allowed a 
declaration must be made. Mr. Whitton 
replied that he did not think the Wil 
liams Co. were precluded from receiv- 
ing the rebate. The Williams Shoe Co. 
wrote the Ontario Tack Co.. informing 
them that when the quotation and pro- 
mise of 5 per cent, rebate was made, no 
mention whatever was made of a declara- 
tion. They did not think, at the time. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



that they would be in any way bound to 
make a declaration o\' loyalty to- the as- 
sociation. They considered that if these 
were the rule-. ihe\ ought io have been 
Informed before. The secretary wrote, 
explaining to them that the 5 per cent. 
in question was allowed to purchasers 
00, and the declaration was nec- 
essary in order thai the company re- 
ceiving the rebate should nol sell the 
goods again to the association's custom- 
er, taking advantage of the 5 per cent. 
rebate. 

Mr. Curry also put in as evidence a 
letter dated January. 1001. from Messrs. 
J. D. King & Co. to Jenkins & Hardy, 
in which they asked for the loyalty re- 
bate to be allowed them, on the ground 
that when the buyer had bought from a 
firm outside the association, he was un- 
aware of his linn's resolution not to buy 
outside. 

jOn January 16, 1001. the Ontario Tack 
Co. wrote to the Montreal Polling Mills 
Co.. informing them that they had been 
unable to touch the Northwest trade, 
and also that a competing firm ("Wynn, 
cf Hamilton) had all the business. "We 
recognize," said they, "that he must 
have some trade,'' but did not feel in- 
clined to make it too easy for him. They 
asked for the sanction of the Montreal 
Rolling Mills to their offering "Wynn's 
principal customers discounts of, 12 1-2 
I er cent, and 7 1-2 per cent. 

Loyalty Rebates. 

On January 21, 1001, the secretary- 
treasurer wrote to the Ontario Tack 
Co. in reference to Messrs. Williams and 
1'nderhill and Sisman, stating- that 
they must make the declaration before 
receiving loyalty payment. They also 
pointed out that all loyalty payments 
were made through the association sec- 
retary, and that the account for the 
amount of the rebates would be sent to 
the Ontario Tack Co. in the course of 
the next few days. 

Another communication was read, 
which pointed out that 4.37 per cent. 
was the same as 5 per cent, after 7\ 
per cent, had been taken off, and that 
4.62 per cent, was the same as 5 per 
cent, after 12.'. per cent, had been taken 
off. 

The following are some of the am- 
ounts due to various firms on account of 
loyalty rebate for six months : The 
Canada Hardware Co., (7^ per cent.), 
$10. .",0; the Hobbs Hardware Co., (7-i 
per cent.), $2.42; M. McPhcrson, (71 
pei cent.), $12.22; Thos. Birkett & Co., 
i Vll per cent.), $8.07. 

The secretary wrote the T. Eaton 
Co., informing them that the Ontario 
Tack Co. had made inquiry about al- 
lowing them 5 per cent, rebate. Before 
this could be done they would have to 
sign the usual declaration of loyalty to 
the association. 

In January. 1901, the various mem- 
bers were written to with regard to 
the advisability, of admitting the Port- 
land Polling .Mill into the association. 

Parly in the same year one of the 
members wrote the secretary, informing 
him that another member had given all 
his business to the Maritime Nail Co., 
adding that in his opinion the affidavits 
wen- "wickedly usele 

In March, 1901, the Ontario Tack Co. 



had to deal with more competition 
from Wynn and the Boston manufactur- 
ers, and in one case booked an order at 
Mr. Wynn's price to prevent him from 
getting it. They, however, decided that 
they had better meet Wynn as regards 
in the Northwest. The Ontario 
Tack Co. wrote to the Pillow-Hersey 
Co., explaining the situation to them, 
as the Pillow-Hersey Co. had complain- 
ed of their action. 

The Ontario Tack Co. also wrote the 
secretary on March 15, 1901, with ref- 
erence to the same matter, saying that 
although their object was to help the 
members to work, as far as possible, in 
harmony, yet they thought it well to 
take the order away from Wynn. They 
added that if anything of that nature 
happened to any of the Montreal manu- 
facturers they were very quick to take 
action. Why should not they (the On- 
tario Tack Co.) do likewise? They in- 
formed the secretary that they should 
not do anything of the kind elsewhere. 

The Montreal Rolling Mills Co.'s let- 
ter in regard to the admission of the 
Portland Rolling Mills was also read by 
Mr. Curry. Although they objected to 
the* Portland Co. coming into the 
company, yet, as that company had 
to dispose of its goods somehow, it 
might as well be controlled by the as- 
sociation. 

The members were asked to furnish to 
the secretary a list of all the tack ma- 
chines in their possession, whether in 
use or not, the list to be treated as 
confidential and not disclosed. The 
members signed agreements that they 
would not "add to their present facili- 
ties for making tacks." It was resolv- 
ed, however, at the next meeting of the 
association, that no action be taken as 
regards facilities for making tacks. 

Monday's Evidence. 

The examination of the papers was 
resumed on Mondav afternoon. 

Mr. Curry put in as evidence an 
agreement signed bv the Ontario Tack 
Co., and dated Anril 10, 1001, in which 
they agreed not to increase their pres- 
ent facilities for making tacks, and 
stated that the number of tack ma- 
chines in use in their factory was 20, 
and that thev had none in their posses- 
sion in a dismantled condition. 

An agreement made by the Pillow- 
Hersey Co., dated April 10, 1001, and a 
letter enclosing same, was also put in, 
together with two unsie-ned agreements, 
and a letter from Jenkins & Hardv to 
the Pillow-Hersey Co., stating that at 
the quarterly meeting of the associa- 
tion the members agreed not to in- 
crease the number of tack machines in 
their factories. 

Mr. Ourrv also produced a letter 
from the Pillow-TTersev Co. to Jenkins 
& Hardv. making a declaration to the 
effect that the number of tack machines 
in their nossession was 72. shoe nail 
machines 7. and shoe rivet machines 8, 
and a declaration from the Ontario 
Tack Co. statins' that the number of 
tnck machines in their factory was 
10. shoe nail machines 1. and shoe rivet 
machines R. The latter company stated 
that, in common with some other mak- 
ers, thev utilized their shoe rivet ma- 
chinery to make small wire nails. 

Another declaration of the same kind 
was from the Montreal Rollins' Mills 
Co., reporting tack machines 48, shoe 
18 



nail machines 5, and shoe rivet ma- 
chines 12. 

A Refusal to Agree. 

On May 10, 1901, the Peck, Benny 
Co. refused to sign the agreement not 
to increase number of tack machines, 
"as the demands of the trade might 
make it necessary for them to do so." 
On April 27, 1901, Jenkins & Hardy 
had written to them asking them to 
make three separate declarations, viz., 
one for each variety of machine. The 
Peck, Benny Co. replied, stating that 
the number of their tack machines was 
23, but that they could not sign the 
agreement without the sanction of Mr. 
Peck, who was away, having had the 
misfortune to break his arm. 

Jenkins & Hardy wrote a few days 
later, saying that they had heard that 
Mr. Peck had returned to business, and 
would be glad if he would sign the 
declaration. Mr. Peck replied on May 
7 : "Your information about my return 
to business is erroneous. You cannot 
break a limb and move around very 
freely. * * * I will attend to the busi- 
ness as soon as I am well enough." 

The Crown Attorney also read a let- 
ter sent by Jenkins & Hardy to the 
Montreal Rolling Mills, containing a 
statement of what was due to them 
from the pool, and which the attorney 
described as being "as clear as mud." 
The total association sales for June, 
1901, were $15,471.17, and the propor- 
tion belonging to the Montreal Rolling 
Mills out of that was $860.47. The per- 
centage received by them was $77, as 
the balance seems to have been due 
from them to the pool. 

Objected to Being Fined. 

• The secretary wrote at this time to 
the Pillow-Hersey Co., informing them 
that thev had seen fit to fine Lewis 
Bros. & Co. $23. Mr. Lewis objected 
to this, saying that he did not see why 
he should be the one selected to be 
made an example of, as there were oth- 
ers equally liable. He stated that he 
should deduct that amount from his 
next payment to the association. 

Jenkins & Hardy wrote also to the 
Montreal Rolling Mills in August, 1901, 
asking them to show cause why they 
should not be fined for violation of the 
association agreement in shipping goods 
to Seattle in bond for delivery in Yu- 
kon Territory at a price below that 
fixed by the association for that terri- 
tory. 

Mr. Curry also put in a bundle of re- 
turns of monthly sales by different 
members from time to time. They 
were not read in court. Also a list of 
Tack Association sales to purchasers 
to June, 1905. 

The Counsel's Arguments. 

Mr. Tilley endeavored to dissuade His 
Worship from committing the case for 
trial, hut the magistrate held that the 
prices had been kept up and that there- 
fore the case came within the meaning 
of the statute. 

Mr. Tilley : "Unless they combined, 
business must have stopped. The stat- 
ute was aimed against those who com- 
bined to unreasonably enhance prices, 
and as in this case there was not evi- 
dence of unreasonable raising of the 
price, it ought to be dismissed." 

Mr. Tilley held that an agreement 
such as the present one may lawfully be 
made so long as it does not unlawfully 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 



enhance the price. He also held that 
with reference to the magistrate's ob- 
jection to members having been lined, 
that if the agreed price was a reasonable 
one it was reasonable to tine those who 
did not abide by it, and the enforcement 
uf the rule was mi evidence of tyranny 

having been practiced by the associa- 
tion. 

Col. Denison : "The principles of this 
combine have got into the commercial 
system. The act was passed to check 
it," 

Mr Tilley : "No. the act was passed 
to stop the unreasonable enhancing of 
prices." 

The magistrate : "If a man is willing 
to sell at $1 and he is compelled to sell 
'at $1.05 the act has been infringed." 

Mr. Tilley : "There has not been one 
word to show that the price has been 
unduly raised." 

The magistrate : "The only cases in 
which the prices have been lowered have 
been where foreign competition com- 
pelled it," 

Mr. Tillev : "If there was evidence to 
show that the source of sn^nlv was tam- 
pered with by the association there 
might be some offence." 

The magistrate stated that he onlv 
thought it necessarv to call the princi- 
pal members of each of the firms impli- 
cated, and adiourned the examination un- 
til Tuesdav to give Mr. Currv time to 
find out whether more than one repre- 
sentative of each firm was included in 
the list of defendants. 

Mr. Tilley in reply to Mr. Curry said 
that he appeared for all the defendants 
except Mr. Noble. 

Adjourned to Tuesday. 

On Tuesday mornino- Mr. Tillev asked 
the magistrate if Mr. Jenkins' name 
could be withdrawn from the list of de- 
fendants. 

Mr. Currv : "Messrs. Hardv & Jen- 
kins were secretarv-treasurers and Mr. 
Jenkins was connected with the incep- 
tion of the association." 

Magistrate Denison : "Let his name 
remain." 

Mr. Tillev then suggested that Mr. 
Cummin" of the Peck-Bennv Co., was 
onlv a traveler and that therefore his 
name might be withdrawn. Mr. Curry 
consented. 

He also suggested that Mr. MacMas- 
ter, the managing director of the Mont- 
real Rolling Mills, be withdrawn as he 
bad not attended the meetings of the 
association since 1895. The magistrate, 
however, considered that he ought to 
appear. The names of A. H. Hough and 
J. Boyd, who were managers in the same 
company, were withdrawn as thev had 
bad nothing to do with the tack depart- 
ment. 

Mr. Tillev suggested that the name of 
Rruckhoff also be withdrawn as he had 
never been present at any of the meet- 
ings. 

Mr. Curry : "He signed agreements for 
the company which he represented and 
therefore ought not to be withdrawn." 

Magistrate Denison : "His name must 
remain. " 

Mr. Currv stated that he had heard 
thai Mr. Tilley would be counsel for 
the defence in all "cases with which Jen- 
kins & Hardv had anvthing to do. 

Mr. Tilley : "You know more than I 
do about it." 

No formal committal will be made un- 
til January 24, the delav being caused 
by the transcription of the notes of the 
evidence. 





SHOW 


WINDOW 


TALK 









McMASTER'S NEW STORE. 

A typical country store is shown in 
1 he accompanying illustration, the store 
being that of F. C. McMaster, Ilavelock, 
Ont., who with his two assistants is 
shown in the doorway. Mr. McMaster 
has been in the hardware business at 
Ilavelock for about eleven pears and the 
business has steadily grown until it was 
necessary to move into larger quarters. 
The present premises have only been oc- 
cupied for a couple of months. The new 
store is twenty-six by fifty feet with a 
tinshop in the rear, modern shelving has 
been installed and the display of shelf 
and heavy hardware, sporting goods, 
stoves and ranges in the interior of the 
store is quite attractive. A feature of 
the interior decoration is a deep red 
border effect on the walls, giving the 
store a most unique and foreign appear- 
ance. 

The photograph does not do full jus- 
tice to the window display, the bunting 



that his machine works easily and is 
demonstrating it bevond dispute in a 
very simple way He placed the little 
rodent in a wheel-like revolving cage, 
the axle of which was connected by 
means of a belt to a pulley on the 
washer. When the little creature would 
begin to frolic about, the cage would 
revolve, the axle would be set in mo- 
tion and the motion transm 
through the belt to the washer. Thus 
work resulted from very little effort, 
and the dealer could say emphatically, 
"Work on this machine is like play." 
Many of the women who stood watch- 
ing the contrivance in action discovered 
for the first time that a machine would 
diminish their home labors. It is like- 
ly, also, that more than one man who 
stood admiring that display contriv 
ance saw for the first time the advant- 
age of a machine that would lighten 
the burdens of his wife and add com- 
fort to his home. Sales that no other 




McMaster'sJNew HardwareStorej Building. r at Havclock, Ont. 



window shown being very attractive, 
the moose head and dummy figure hold-" 
ing a rifle being important features of 
the display. The window dressing was 
done by Gordon C. Macintosh, Mr. Mc- 
Master's chief assistant. The store does 
a large farmers' trade and the display 
of churns, washing machines, farm tools, 
etc., on the sidewalk, shows that an ef- 
fort is being made to keep these lines 
before the eyes of probable buyers. 



WINDOW DISPLAY ADVERTISING. 

Every hardwarcman argues that a 
washer is a great economy, and 
that "Smith's" make is the easiest 
to operate. A child, they will say, 
can run it, Mere talking, however, 
does not go very far. People want 
demonstrated facts. Tf the seller claims 
that a certain make is easiest to work 
they want to know why and how. 

A merchant in an eastern city, says 
the American Artizan. showed this 
knowledge of human nature. He claims 



storekeeper would have expected, our 
ingenious friend made with no difficulty. 



THE WINDOW DISPLAY. 

Every well-dressed window is a sort 
of salesman. What is yours ? 

Something different from the ordinary, 
something novel, is the great want in 
window displays. Never copy other win- 
dows closely ; never follow the general 
custom as to the kinds of goods to be 
shown. Always try to be different. To 
be different is to be successful nine times 
out of ten. 

When the window is dumb, the busi- 
ness suffers. The window must be made 
to talk, and to talk freelv, cogent lv and 
interestingly. What does your window 
say to the public ? Does it say : Here 
is a nice store, with a well-selected 
stock,, a staff of competent clerks, a sat- 
isfactory delivery system — does it say 
all this and more ? If it does not, you 
should improve its utterance, and make 
the store, the goods and the service 



19 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware -Metal 

President . 
JOW.V B4y.\£ MACLEAN 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in 
the Provinces of British Columbia. North-West Ter- 
ritories, Manitoba. Ontario. Quebec. Nova Scotia. 
New Brunswick, IMC. Island and Newfoundland. 



mostrfal. 
Toronto. 
Winnipeg. 
London, Eng. 



232 McGill Street 

Telephone Main 1235 

10 Front Street East 

Telephones Main 2701 and 2702 

511 Union Bank Building 

Telephone 3726 

- 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim 

Telephone, Central 12960 

BRANCHES : 



St. John. N.B. - - - No. 3 Market Wharf 
VANCOUVER, B.C. - - - Geo. S. B. Perry 

Paris, France - Agence Havas, 8 Place dela Bourse 
Manchester. Eno. - - - 92 Market Street 

Zi'Ricti. Switzerland ... Louis Wolf 

Orell Fussli & Co. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 



Published every Saturday. 

Adscript, Lo 
Adscript, Canada 



Cable Address { A 4 scr !Pt. London 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Dorken Bros., Montreal. 
Enterprise Mfg. Co. of Pa., Philadelphia. 
J. N. Warmiugton, Montreal. 



IS THE LAW AGAINST BUSINESS 

MEN? 

The prosecutions which have been in- 
stituted against some of the business 
organizations in Canada raise some im- 
portant points. One in particular is in 
regard to the legality of any organiza- 
tions which business men may see tit to 
create. 

Ln this day and generation, organiza- 
ii< ns amongst business men are a nec- 
essity. Where they do not exist, there 
crying need for them, whether it be 
among retailers, wholesalers, or manu- 
facturers. It is born of the conditions 
which exist to-day, where competition is 
the life of trade. But there is competi- 
tion and competition. When competi- 
tion is excessive or unjust, ruin is cer- 
tain to follow. 

Organizations, as a rule, are born of 
the desire, not to resort to unjust 
methods, but to remedy evils which exist. 
Even the organizations of the master 
plumbers and the supply met were at 
first created for this purpose. It was 
only when they became masters of the 
situation that they became arbitrary. 
Had the-,- stuck to the early intent 



i f their organization no one would have 
had just cause to complain. 

Now. however, thai the courts have 
started upon the repression of unjust 
combines or associations, it is just pos- 
sible that such a narrow interpretation of 
the law may be taken, that wherever 
there is an organization of business 
men. prosecution for conspiracy or re- 
straint of trade may follow. 

Should il be found that this narrow 
interpretation of the law leads to the 
penalizing of organizations of business 
men who had no intention of either re- 
stricting trade or conspiring against 
non-members or anyone concerned; the 
law should be amended at the earliest 
possible moment. 

Some 34 years ago, when the printers 
of Toronto struck for the nine-hour day. 
it was found that those engaged in the 
strike were guilty of infraction of the 
law, and several of the leaders were ar- 
rested, among them being the late E. F. 
Clarke, M.P. for Centre Toronto. Sir 
John Macdonald, however, came to the 
rescue and passed legislation which re- 
moved the disability under which trade 
unions then rested. 

No one then, or since, has questioned 
the amendments that were made to the 
law; nor will anyone question the right 
of business men to organize for legiti- 
mate purposes, but, judging from the 
turn which affairs are taking before the 
courts, it will be necessary for the law 
to he amended in somp way in order to 
protect such organizations from narrow 
and unjust prosecution. 

r l he business men of this country, 
whether they are manufacturers, whole- 
saler-, or retailers, need organization, 
and if the present law prevents them 
from enjoying this, the disabilities un- 
der which they labor must be removed. 
. If working men, lawyers, doctors and 
others can be allowed to create what are 
practically close corporations, surely 
business men cannot be denied the right 
to organize simply for the purpose of 
rectifying evils which exist in their sev- 
eral lines of trade. 



PROTECTION FOR SHIPPING. 
It appears from statistics, that, of the 
total imports received into Canada dur- 
ing 1905, 62 1-2 per cent, represented 
the goods coming from the United 
Slates, while indications are that the 
present twelve months will see an even 
larger proportion. The result of this 
situation is seen in the fact that ships 
are now coming out from Great Britain 
and the continent; comparatively light 
i0 



indeed, it is said that they are not 
carrying enough freight to pay ex- 4 
peiises on that part of the trip, so thai. 
if the proportion of goods brought in 
from the continent keeps on decreas- 
ing, we shall he confronted with a ser- 
ious problem, so far as carrying goods 
hack a"ain to Europe is concerned. As 
Canada relies on cheap freights for ex- 
porting grain and other products, and 
must have a good line of steamships for 
tarrying perishable goods such as 
fruits, it would seem to be equally to 
the benefit of the Government of Can- 
ada to have plenty of carrying capacity 
for Canadian exports, as it is to en- 
xourage manufacturing enterprise here. 
For, if the steamship companies lose 
money on the trip out from the Old 
'Country, they will have to make a heavy 
rate on the return journey, and that 
would soon put Canada out of the run- 
ning for the British market. 

Under these circumstances, it would 
seem that the steamship companies 
should be protected in some way, and 
prominent importers of British and con- 
tinental manufactures are proposing 
that an automatic dumping clause be 
put into effect on goods not manufac- 
tured in Canada, but ordinarily import- 
ed from Europe. 

\A case in point is that of sheet metals, 
with which the American producers, 
according to whether or not they have a 
surplus stock, spasmodically invade the 
Canadian market, and cut well under 
i!ae best British prices. But there is no 
stability in this condition, so far as 
Canadian manufacturers are concerned, 
for the Americans are on and off the 
market, and frequent recourse must, in 
any case, be had, to British producers. 

A peculiar feature of this market 
just now, is that, on black sheets, Can- 
ada plates, and other comparatively 
louidi metals, the British manufacturers 
are holding their own here, while in the 
more highly finished sheets, and those 
whiclh require vastly more labor in their 
production, the Americans are, just now, 
practically ruling the market. In view 
of the fact that labor is much more ex- 
pensive in the United States than in 
Europe, there is but one explanation for 
this condition. 

It must be admitted that tthe ques- 
tion of Atlantic transportation is vital 
to Canada's prosperity. Hence, it will 
require much careful thought to so ad- 
just Canada's tariff as to protect our 
shipping as well as our manufacturing 
interest s. 



January 20, 1906 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



RETAIL HARDWARE ASSOCIATION 

After the holidays it was expected 
that many hardware merchants would 
take up the subject of organizing a r<' 
tail hardware association in Ontario in 
letters to this paper, but since the 
timely and interesting letter written 
by Mr. Westcott, of Ailsa Craig, pub- 
lished two weeks ago, there has been 
almost a dead silence on this important 
subject. No doubt most dealers are 
busy stock taking, but if any action is 
to be taken towards improving the 
conditions under which the trade is 
now working the time for that action 
is now, when preparations can be made 
for holding a convention on Good Fri- 
day if enough interest is manifested 
to warrant the holding of such a gath- 
ering. There is not going to be any 
heaven-bom leader come down to do 
the work of organization for the hard- 
ware trade of this province, and if any 
association is to be formed it must be 
done b" the merchants themselves. 

Hardware and Metal offers space in 
its correspondence columns to any 
reader who has anything to say on the 
subject of a hardware association, and 
it urges the formation of a provincial 
committee to undertake the preliminary 
work of sending out a call for the sug- 
gested convention. Possibly some 
members of the Western Retail Hard- 
ware Association can give some ideas 
to aid the proposed organization in On- 
tario. 

To show the ?ood use that conven- 
tions can be put to here are a few left- 
over questions at a recent gathering on 
the other side of the line. Can you 
answer them ? 

In a general cash and credit business, 
what percentage of annual sales should 
be in open accounts on the books on an 
average throughout the year ? 

What is the most effective way to ad- 
vertise ; 

Is it good business policy to make 
concessions in prices to farmers' clubs 
on staple articles ? 

How is your business affected by the 
large corporations or the so-called 
"trusts ' 

In what way can we be of benefit to 
each other between our regular meet- 
ings ? 

Is it more effective to handle and 
push one brand of goods than to carry 
several brand- ' 

Does it pay to cut the established 
price on a standard article in order to 
hold business , 

How do you keep track of your claims 
against the railroads for overcharges 
and damages ' 

How far should business courtesy ex- 
tend between competitors in the same 
town ? 



What is a healthy limit for the es 
pense account as compared with total 
-airs; or. what proportion should be 

Rgured bet w ecu t he two 1 

Which brings the most trade, selling 
price, purchasing price, quality and 
quantity, location or advertising? 

Docs it pa\ to dress show window- 
in a .small town .' 

Should a merchant sell at the same 
price to everybody alike, or make dif- 
ferent prices to different customers ! 

Should the selling price ol goods be 
marked in plain figures or characters '. 

Assuming thai every business maj in- 
divided into three principal depart- 
ments, 1 -buying, 2 selling, 3 account 
irtg, i.e., office work and collecting, 
which of these departments can be ne 
fleeted with the Least detriment to, the 
general business ' 




A M. Bell. 

Wholesale Hardware Merchant, who lias been Elected 

President ol the Halifax Board oi Trade. 

Should a merchant make his remit- 
tances by local cheek or bank draft'' 

What are the leading characteristics 
of a good salesman ? 

Is it best to have strictly one price '. 



PAINT ADULTERATION. 
Considerable interest has been aroused 

by the announcement from Ottawa that 
a pamphlet would shortly be issued by 
the Geological Survey Department show- 
ing how Canadian paint manufacturers 
could improve the quality of their pro- 
duct by using domestic minerals, and 
claiming that the paints made in this 
country now are "adulterated % beyond 
measure." 

It is the unanimous statement of man- 
ufacturers who have been interviewed on 
the subject that they would be only too 
delighted to make absolutely pure paints 
only, but their market would be ruinous- 

21 



h curtailed if they did so and added the 
pi ne nccessai y to make a profil . 

Among. the most common adulter! 
paints ale various shades of red. There 
are good deposits of iron oxides in the 

Three ttivers district, which have been 
wanked up, but there are certain shades 
which cannot he produced from them, 
and ii is consequently necessary to im- 
port from across the ocean certain 
grades of ochres and icils lo produce the 
colors required. Furthermore, in actual 
use ii is not necessary for Venetian red 
to be absolutely pure oxide ol i 

Su fai as while lead is concerned, it 
is agreed that every effort should he 
made to keep the article pure, as adul- 
terants would seriously affect the dura- 
bility of the paint. But oxides are 
much stronger than white lead, and the 
presence of adulterants is not so keenly- 
felt. In fact, those most commonly used 
will last as long as the oil in which 
they are mixed. 

At present, the old hog-iron district 
of Three Rivers, previously mentioned, 
is the only part of Canada where oxides 
approximating purity are mined, hut 
even these have to be treated, and the 
impure matter burned out. It is proba- 
ble that isolated samples can lie pro- 
duced from many parts of Canada, but 
manufacturers express serious doubts as 
to whether the pamphlet of the Geologi- 
cal Survey will discJose any new depos- 
its of such quantities as to be commer- 
cially valuable. 



THE MARKET DAY. 

Western merchants arc making g I 

use of the market day. The number of 
towns using this trade coaxes in the 
Western States lias increased greatly 
during the past year, savs the Hardware 
Trade. 

Methods for making the market day 
a success depend much Upon the com- 
u unity yon have to please. In one 
community it is enough that a free 
auction for any and all kinds of pro- 
dude i i- farm chattels be held. In other 
(ommunities Held day games are needed 
to draw the crowd. Jn still others the 
c Id plan of merchants giving prizes in 
various contests works well. (In any of 
them tlie net result is bringing the mer- 
chants and the townspeople nearer to 
the farmers ami their families. It is 
a good scheme, one that has awakened 
many a town from a sound sleep. 



How are the roads '. Are you doing 
anything toward keeping them in t 
shape ' Do the merchants of youi 
realize that good roads are as necessary 
as good prices for product I 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



January 20, 1906 



SUCCESSFUL JOBBERS 
AND SALESMEN. 



No. 15. 



Twenty-four years ago Mr. (Jeorgc 
Browne entered the service of the firm of 
Crathern & Caverhill, in the capacity of 
traveling salesman. To him was allot- 
ted the entire Province of Quebec, and 
for many years lie covered alone the 
ground which is now worked by six 
travelers. He was the pioneer salesman 
of his firm in this territory. 

When Crathern & Caverhill withdrew 
[rem business and Caverhill, Learmont 
cV Co. entered the tield, Mr. Browne be- 
came identified with the new firm, and 
his territory was gradually narrowed as 
new men were put on the road until it 
came to include only that part of Que- 
bec Province known as the Eastern 




George Browne, 

Representing Caverhill, Learmont & 

Co., Montreal, in the Eastern 

Townships. 



Townships, where he is to-day recogniz- 
ed as dean of the hardware trade. 

The esteem in which he is held by his 
customers is evidenced by the fact that 
he still has their confidence, after a 
business relationship with them extend- 
ing over twenty-four years. On the oth- 
er hand, he is equally popular among his 
confreres on the road. Mr. Browne also 
possesses executive ability in a rare de- 
gree, and has for four years been a di- 
rector of the Dominion Commercial 
Travelers' Association. 

Mi. Browne is married, and is a mem- 
ber of the Montreal Amateur Athletic 
Association, the greatest athletic or- 
ganization in the country. 

In spite of his long service he expects 
still to hold his trade for many years 
to come. 



Honest weights help more than tricky 
balances. 



SEASONABLE SUGGESTIONS. 
It will pay to use good wrapping 
paper. 

'I he road to success is not lined with 
shade trees and sod walks. 
To avoid meetine misfortunes we must 

'jet oil' the road on which they travel. 

'I he man of real nerve is the man who 
can keep his mouth shut, hut is always 
there when needed. 

Keep hatchets, axes and saws in mind 
when looking for window display ma- 
terial. This is when they are used. 

Put a striii" of sleigh bells out in 
front where every hoy that passes will 
give it a pull or where the wind will 
shake I hem. 

Now is the time to close out your 
skates and sleds. You will have but a 
small business from now on in these 
lines and you had better try to make 
them move. 

Barn door hangers, latches, hooks, 
pulls, etc., will soon be seasonable. The 
farmer will be figuring on repairs be- 
fore long. Be ready when lie wants the 
goods. 

if you want to do a large amount of 
business in a short time you do not 
want to be bothered answering people 
who want to know the price of this or 
that article. For the busy season and 
for the dull season as well have price 
cards in plain sieht. 

A clerk who checks the invoice over 
carefully when the new merchandise ar- 
rives is said to be a rare bird. Most 
clerks check it any old way, and the 
proprietor has little to depend upon. 
Checking the goods in, examining of in- 
voices, and the markings of goods seem 
to be duties which the merchant must 
look after himself if it is to be pro- 
perly done. 

Devote some of your spare moments 
to ] lanning your advertising this year. 
You cannot lay out every detail, to be 
sure, but you can form a general idea 
of what you will advertise at certain 
seasons and prepare copy for a good 
many general ads to be used early in 
the Spring. Write to jobbers for cuts 
that you will need. 

A city hardware store the other day- 
had a window entirely devoted to food 
Choppers. There was a board along the 
'front, wit|h choppers clamped on as 
closely as tfhey would stick. This is 
the kind of repetition in trimming that 
is sure to catch the eye. Try it some 
time. Food choppers are a good line 
to use for this, by the way. They are 
always in demand. —Hardware Trade. 
22 



OUR LETTER BOX 

Correspondence on matters of interest to the hard- 
ware trade is solicited. Manufacturers, jobbers, 
rel uilcrs anil clerks arc urged to express their opin- 
ions on matters under discussion. 



_ A CLERK'S VIEW. 

Editor of Hardware and Metal :— Hav- 
ing read with interest the views express- 
ed by some employers on the subject of 
overtime and vacations, I should like to 
express a clerk's views on some mat- 
ters of this kind. 

The query arises, does it pay to be 
strict about time with all employes V 
Certainly clerks should be given to un- 
derstand that they are expected to be 
on dulv at the time appointed, and- 
those who are continually late show a 
lack of interest in their work, and this 
will undoubtedly count against them in 
their promotion. But, especially in the 
larger firms, the tendency is to be too 
strict, and some houses not only have 
time clocks on which the employes re- 
cord their time, but have a man to 
watch . the clock and make a special re- 
port of all who are late. 

"The time clock upon which you re- 
cord your time shows that you were 
four minutes late this 5-27-02. This is 
the first time you have been late and 
notified, and we ask that you be more 
prompt in future." 

A note of this kind naturally annoys 
a conscientious and punctual employe, 
and it is not to be wondered at if in 
future he makes it a point to punch the 
time clock on the minute instead of a 
few minutes early in the morning and 
late at night as previously, or walk up 
and down the street at noon until his 
full hour is up. 

Not long ago a wholesale house issued 
a notice that "owing to their having 
been imposed upon by their employes 
they had been forced to adopt the policy 
of 'no work no pay,' and hereafter no 
lost time from any cause whatever, in- 
cluding sickness, would be paid for." 
The same firm had worked so much over- 
time in the past year that had it been 
allowed for at regular time most of the 
employes would have received about 
three or four weeks extra salary, but 
all they did receive was a meal ticket 
to a restaurant or car tickets both ways 
home to supper. Under the circum- 
stances, is it not natural that these em- 
ployes will not work a minute of over- 
time that they can help ? A man that 
is a man wants to be treated like a man 
and no business is so large that it is 
necessary to treat him like a machine, 
or if they do, he will only do the work 
of a machine, not of a man. 

A HARDWARE CLERK. 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 



Hardware Trade Gossip 



Quebec. 

Alex. Bonin, plumber and tinsmith, 
Joliette, Que., was in Montreal recent- 
ly- 

Robt. Kerr, of the Kerr Engine Co., 
Walkerville, Out., was in Montreal last 
Tuesday. 

C. E. Keeler, tinsmith, of Iroquois, 
Ont., visited Montreal on a buying ex- 
pedition the other day. 

J. VV. Davis has been appointed public- 
ity manager of the Canadian Rand Drill 
Co., with headquarters at Montreal. 

W. (iaulin, tinsmith and plumber, of 
St. Cesaire, called on some of the sup- 
ply houses in Montreal during the week. 

Geo. II. Pedlar, Sr., of the Pedlar 
People, Oshawa, spent the latter part 
of the week in Montreal on a purchasing 
tour. 

A. H. Campbell, of A. C. Leslie & 
Co., metal merchants, Montreal, is not 
able to attend to his duties this week 
owing to illness. 

Eusebe Monbleau, steam-fitter and 
machinist, of St. Johns, Que., was 
among the out-of-town merchants in 
Montreal this week. 

Mi . Matte, of Vandry & Matte, plumb- 
ers, Quebec city, placed some orders 
with Montreal supply houses while in 
the latter city this week. 

The contract for the galvanized roofing 
on the new addition to the Peck Rolling 
Mills, Montreal, has been let to F. F. 
Powell & Co. of that city. 

Mr. R. B. Leslie, formerly of Caver- 
hill, Learmont & Co.'s staff, but now 
with A. C. Jenkins, Montreal, spent 
part of this week in New York. 

D. J. McCormick, of the Montreal 
traveling staff of the Pedlar People, has 
secured th; contract for a metal ceiling 
to be placed in the parish church at 
Joliette. 

The Notre Dame Hardware Co., Mont- 
real, are moving into splendid new quor- 
ters on the corner of St. James and 
Fulford streets. This is three or four 
doors east of their old stand. 

Frank Turner is the latest man to 
annex a Caverhill, Learmont & Co. 
.sample case. He will cover part of New 
Brunswick in the interests of this firm, 
making his initial trip next week. 

The J. C. McLaren Belting Co., Mont- 
real and Toronto, are celebrating their 
"golden anniversary" by sending out to 
their customers a paper-weight repre- 
senting a pile of ten gold pieces of large 
dimensions. 

Maison Jean Paquette,- Montreal, has 
bought the stock of the late Joseph 
Jean Paquette, who was instantly killed 
by an electric wire some weeks ago. 
The store at 1584 St. Lawrence street 
will be kept as a branch. 

Versailles Freres, hardware merchants, 
Montreal, have dissolved partnership, 
and while one will continue the hard- 
ware business, the other intends to go 
into the manufacture of a railwav sig- 
nal apparatus which he has patented. 

Joseph Keeffer, who has been clerk 
with David Drysdale, hardware mer- 



chant, Montreal, for the past six yens, 
has bought the hardware store ol tfaj 
Bros., 5!J'J Wellington street, Point St. 
Charles. He intends opening about 
February 1. 

In response to a small paragraph in 
last issue regarding a calendar published 
by Ludger (1 ravel, the well known 
Montreal hardware merchant, there 
came many requests. In explanation re- 
garding his inabilitv to grant these, Mr. 
Gravel stated that by an accident in his 
premises which caused the bursting of a 
water pipe, his whole remaining stock of 
calendars has been destroyed, or at least 
rendered unfit for use. 

Ludger (J ravel, Jacques Cartier 
Square, Montreal, has been appointed 
agent for Canada for M. Hunter & Co., 
Limited, cutlery manufacturers, Talbot 
Works, Sheffield, Eng. This agency was 
obtained really while Mr. Gravel was 
over the sea with the Canadian Manu- 
facturers' Association, and he stated the 
other day that he had bought many 
British lines after seeing them made 
that previously he never used. 

J. C. Pendray, manager of the Brit- 
ish-American Paint Co., of Victoria and 
Vancouver, called at the Montreal office 



LAST MINUTE MARKETS. 

Montreal, Jan. 19, 1906 

.Discount on Lead Pipe has been changed to 
15 per cent. 

Ingot Tin is now quoted at 39%c. 
Turpentine is firm at 95 cents. 



of Hardware and Metal this week. Be- 
sides being interested in the paint busi- 
ness Mr. Pendray is the largest manu- 
facturer of soap in British Columbia. 
His statement that business is brisk, 
with splendid prospects, should thus be 
accepted as coming from one who is best 
qualified to judge. Mr. Pendray is a 
most interested reader of Hardware and 
Metal and always looks forward to its 
arrival on Thursday, when it usually 
reaches the Pacific shores. 

Ontario. 

James Clark, Brechin, called on To- 
ronto hardware jobbers this week. 

Wm. Conrad, plumber, .Waterloo, paid 
a visit to Toronto supply houses this 
week. 

L. A. Payette, of Warden King & 
Son, Montreal, was a visitor in To- 
ronto this week. 

Harry Moore, hardware merchant, 
Oakville, made a buying- trip to To- 
ronto during- the past week. 

James Ballantyne, plumber, Mont- 
real, called on friends in the heating 
trade in Toronto this week. 

It is said that the Murphy Varnish 
Company, New York, propose to estab- 
lish a branch plant in Toronto. 

Peter Hymmen. Berlin, is building a 
new hardware store, and expects to 
move into it in a couple of months. 

H. E. Hamilton, of Drummond, Mc- 
Call & Co.. Montreal, returned from a 

23 



l,,i ,im- fcxip to Pitt but Pew days 

i i 

E l .aw fence, hardware mei chanl , To 
ronto, has moved into his handsome 
new store on the corner of Blooi and 
Marguerel t a si reel -,. 

The Canada Brass Rolling .Mills, New 

Toronto, have been closed down tem 

poi arily. Alterations will be made and 
the works re-opened in the Spring. 

M. E. Murray, Canadian represents 
tivc of the Borden I '■• , Wai ren, Ohio, 

has returned to Toronto from a trip to 
headquarters, but will BOOH leave on 
an extended trip to Chicago. 

\ii Smallpiece, of Lewis Bros., Lim- 
ited, is spending a short vacation in 
Toronto and New York. He is accom- 
panied on his trip by George W. Eccle 
stone, hardware merchant, of Brace 
bridge, Ont. 

C. C. Ballantyne. of .Montreal, presi 

dent, of the Canadian Manufacturers 

Association, was in Toronto this week 
to attend the monthly meeting^ of the 
executive council of the association. 

J. H. Stewart, Tilbury, son of M 
Stewart, hardware merchant, has joined 
the arnro of benedicts. The ceremony 
was performed on Dec. 1!) last, and the 
bride was the recipient of many hand- 
some and costly gifts. 

The hardware and tinware business ol 
Win. English & Co., at Hastings, has 
been purchased )•■■ Messrs. .1. E. Wilcox 
and H. Lambert, the new firm to be 
known as Wilcox & Lambert. Mr. Eng 
lish intends moving to Western Canada. 

The Peterboro Lock Company are fit- 
ting up new rolling and plating room-. 
removing the brass foundry to the new- 
addition, and making other alterations. 
The enlarged facilities will give the 
company an opportunity 1 to increase the 
output from one-third to one-half. 

Mr. R. J. Younge, secretary of the 
Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 
has tendered his resignation, having ac- 
cepted the position as salesmanager of 
the Canadian Rubber Co., of Montreal. 
Mr. J. F. M. Stewart, secretary of the 
Toronto branch, will probably be his 
successor. 

Western Canada. 

A petty strike has occurred in the 
Burton Saw Works at Vancouver, the 
whole force of nine men leaving because 
the foreman was dismissed. 

Maritime Provinces. 
John O'Brien, plumber, St. John, 
was married on Jan. 8 to Miss Eliza- 
beth Fulton, of Minto, N.B. 

United States. 

The Champion Mfg. Co., Rocky Mill, 
Conn., have arranged with the Smith 
i\ Memenwav Co., New York, for the 
entire sale of the product of their fac- 
tory of axes, hammers, hatchets, can 
openers, and seasonable goods, such as 
ice picks, etc. Prices and illustrations 
will be furnished by them to the trade 
on amplication. 

Owing to the increased demand for 
their goods the Schatz Hardware Mfg. 
Co., Chappaqua, N.Y., have mail 
addition of 50 x 40 to their forging de- 
partment, and have installed a new en- 
gine and boiler room, with new engines 
and boilers to handle their increased 
production. The company manufactures 
a cheap line of nail pullers, mitre boxes 
and electrical tools. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 




(For detailed price* se© Current Market Quotations, pas* 66.) 



THE WEEKS MARKETS IN BRIEF. 

MONTREAL. 

Ingot Tin has advanced Ic. 

Pig Lead has declined 5c. per Km lbs. 

Antimony is quoted al IV. u> I 

IllgOt HBO— An advance of %c. has been made. 

Sheet Zinc is also quoted V- bigherthan la>i 

•reek. 
Bar Iron is up to (2.03 F.o.0. Montreal. 
Saturated Paper 1-. now $2.00 per 100 lbs. 
Cotton Candle Wicks have gone up toSSHfi. 
Linseed Oil il 5c. above last week's prices. 
Turpentine has declined le. 
Canadian Paris Creen has advanced 3c. 

TORONTO. 

Paris Creen -Canadian pure has advanced 3c. 
Linseed Oil -Sonic dealer* have advanced an- 
other 2c. 
Jute Twines -Certain lines have been raised %c' 
Ingot Tin -Prices have declined lc. 
Antimony-, \nother x /qC. advance has been made 
Bar Iron — Quotations are $1 per ton higher. 

WINNIPEG. 

Barb Wire— Prices have been cut 10c. 



Quebec Hardware Markets. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan. 19, 1906. 

During the past week trade lias picked 
up considerably among the local job- 
bers. Travelers ' orders are beginning 
ti. eome in very regularly, and particular- 

t'nmi the west. There is no particular 
feature to note about the trade, except 
thai owing to lack of snow, the sale of 
sleigh hells in some parts of the coun- 
try has been quite disappointing. 

Prices, are all very firm, but changes 
of any importance are not numerous. 
Cotton candle wick is now being quoted 
at 22 l-2c; saturated paper at $2.00 per 
hundred lb>.. and bar iron has again ad- 
vanced to $2.05 Prothingham & Work- 
man. Limited, of Montreal, have adopt- 
ed the American lists on Gilmore's aug- 
ers and hits. 

Axes— Nothing new has occurred to 
change the current of trade in this 
branch. Our quotations are as 
follows: Chopping axes, unhandled, 
$6.00 to $9.50 per dozen; double bitt 
axes, $9.50 to $12 a dozen; handled 
. $7.50 to $9.50; Canadian pattern 
axes, $7.50 a dozen. 

Handles— We quote: No. 3, $1.25; 
Nd. 2, $1.50; No. 1, $1.90 a dozen; adze 
handles. 34 inch, $2.20 a dozen: pick- 
handles. No. 2, $1.70: No. 3, $1.50 a 
dozen. 

Sewing Machines — Sales are Only 
moderate and prices remain as follows: 
Hand-sewing machines, $11 each, net: 
complete machines, with stand, $18.00 
and up, according to quality. 

Lanterns — Last week's conditions still 



prevail. We are still quoting: Cold 
blast, $4.50; \'o. Safety. $5.00. 

Rivets and Burrs— The continued 
firmness in llie iron and steel, as well 
as in the copper market makes .prices 
extremely Steady in this line. The de- 
mand is fair at the following prices: 
Lest iron rivets, section, carriage and 
wagon hox, black rivets, tinned do., 
copper rivets and tin swede rivets, 60, 
10 aud 10 per cent.: swede iron burrs 
are quoted at' 60 and 10 and 10 per cent. 
off new lists; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of buns, 40 per cent. 
off; and coppered iron rivets and burrs 
in 5-lh. carton boxes at 60 and 10 and 
10 per cent.; copper burrs alone, 30 per 
cent., subject to usual charge for 
half-pound boxes. 

Hay Wire — Our prices remain : No. 13, 
$2.45; No. 14, $2.55; No. 15, $'2.70; net 
cash, f.o.b., Montreal. 

Screws — The turnover is. as usual, at 
this time of year, not particularly brisk. 
Prices are still quoted as follows: 



bright, 82 1- 



per 



rent.; flat head, bright, 87 1-2 per cent.. 
brass, round head, 75 per cent.; brass. 
Cat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— Our prices remain 
: s follows : 3-8 and smaller, 

60 to 10: 7-16 and larger 55 and 5. 

Horse Nails — Orders are in fair quan- 
tilv, and the market remains firm at 
the new prices recently listed. Our dis- 
counts are ouoted as follows: 
C brand, 40, 10 and 7 1-2 per cent.: 
M.S.M. Co., 55 per cent.: P.B. brand. 55 
I er cent 

Wire Nails— Trade is quite lively aud 
orders for Spring shipment are numer- 
ous. Our price is: $2.15 per keg, f.o.b., 
.Montreal. 

Cut Nails — r l here is very little activ- 
ity manifest. We quote: $2.20 per 
keg, f.o.b , Montreal. 

Horseshoes— Our -rices remain as 
follows: P.B. New Pattern, base price, 
$3.50 per 100 lbs.. M.R.M Co. latest im- 
proved pattern iron shoes, light and 
medium pattern No. 2 and larger, $3.65 : 
No. 1 and smaller, $3.90; snow pattern. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.90, No. 1 and smaller 
$4.15. Light steel shoes, No. 2 and larg- 
er, $4, No. 1 and smaller, $4.25; feath- 
erweight, all sizes. No. to 4, $5.60. 
Toeweight, all sizes. N'o. 1 to 4, $6.85 
Lacking, up to three sizes in a keg. 10c. 
per 100 pounds. More than three sizes. 

Sporting Goods- In spite of somewhat 
unfavorable weather the trade in snow- 
shoes and skates show- Very In tie let-up. 
We quote as follows: Skates from 25e to 
$2.50, according to quality; snowshoes 
from $15 to $35 per pozen pairs, accord- 
ing to quality. 

Building Paper— Shipments are still 
vei \ few in number, though orders for 

24 



Spring delivery have been hooked right 
along. 'I he new prices which we men- 
tioned last week have been maintained. 

Cement and Firebrick — There is very 
little doing except in firebrick, which 
shows greater activit ■ than is usual so 
early in the year. We quote as follows: 
$1.80 to $1.90: Belgium, $1.60 to $1.90 
per barrel ; ex-store, American, $2.00 te 
$2.10 ex-cars; Canadian Portland, $2 00 
to $2.05. Firebrick, English and Scotch, 
$17.00 to $21.00: American, $30 to $35; 
White Bros.' Eng. cement, $1.80 in bags, 
$2.05 in barrels in round lots. 

Coil Chain— Our prices are as fol- 
lows: 5-16 inch, $4.25; 3-8 inch, $3.75: 
7-16 inch, $3.55; 1-2 inch, $3.35; 9-16 
inch, $3.30; 5-8 inch, $3.20; 3-4 inch, 
$3.05; 7-8 inch, $3.00; 1 inch. $2.95. 

Shot— Prices still being quoted at net 
list. 

S'eigh Bells — Dealeis in some parts of 
the country report that the lack of snow- 
lias made sa'es very disappointing. We 
still quote as follows: Back straps. 
30c. to $2.50; body straps, 70c. to $3.50; 
York Eye bells, common, 70c. to $1.50, 
pear shape. $1.15 to $2.00; shaft gongs, 
20c. to $2.50: Grelots, 35c. to $2.00: 
team bells. $1.80 to $5.50; saddle gongs, 
$1.10 to $2.60. 

Horse Blankets — Our "rites are: Jute, 
unlined, $4.50; 3-4 lined, $9.50; full lin- 
ed, $12; 16-oz. Hessian, unlined, $6.50; 
3-4 lined, $11.50; full lined, $14, and 
up to $24; Kersey blankets, $9 to $21 ; all 
wool, $24, $30, $48 and $60. 

Raw Furs— Owing to the comparative- 
ly mild winter which is being experienc- 
ed all over the country, the demand for 
furs has been much below the average 
this year, a condition which must, of 
necessity, have a depressing effect on the 
raw fur market. 

Prices just now are fairly stiff, very 
favorable quotations being given on many 
skins, but those "in the know" are ex- 
pecting a big tumble, as a result of the 
conditions before mentioned. January 
sales are sure to be disappointing, and 
they will react upon the raw fur market. 
We quote prices on leading lines: 

No. 1. No. 2. No. 3. No. 4 

Bear Mark *18 00 ¥12 00 #4 00 SI 00 

" 1500 8 CO 3 00 

•• " Yearlings 700 5 00 200 030 

Kisher 6 00 4 00 2 00 1 00 

p ox Red 3 00 2 00 1 00 20 

ii ' Cross 5 00 4 00 2 00 50 

c v „x 600 400 150 050 

Marten Dark 10 00 5 00 2 00 50 

Pale 5 00 2 75 1 25 50 

Mink Dark <> 00 4 00 1 50 50 

Pale 3 25 2 50 1 50 

Muskrat Spring 20 15 .... 03 

Winter 15 15 .... 03 

Ont. fcE.Fall ..12c to 15 15 

N W.T.&VV. " . llcto 12 7c 08 .... 03 

Kahbit 001 00J 

Raccoon 125 70 30 10 

Skunk 160 100 075 40 

Weasel White 50 25 10 04 

Wolf Timber 4 00 

Pnirie 1 25 50 30 

Wolverine 4 Of. to 6 00 2 to3 00 1 tol 50 50o lo75c 



January 20, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



Ontario Hardware Markets. 

Office of Hardwark and Mktal, 
10 Front Street Ensi 

Toronto, Jan' 19, 1906. 

Business for January is very good, 
and jobbers are receiving good sized or- 
ders for seasonable goods as well as con- 
siderable sorting articles from dealers 
who have found themselves short on 
some lines during stock-taking. Travel- 
ers ace booking good business for future 
delivery, the general feeling being op- 
timistic regarding Spring trade. 

Prices, with the exception of jute, 
Italian and Russian twines, remain' as 
before. In the metal markets, bar iron 
has it ade another advance, but such 
heavy goods as holts, nuts, etc., remain 
unchanged. 

Axes and Handles— Demand is good 
for I'ns season. 

Cutlery— Trade is not heavy at tins 
season. 

Sporting Goods— Skates are still sell- 
ing, and fishing tackle is being hooked 
for Spring delivery in good quantities. 

Washirg Machines— Hooked orders 
for Spring delivery are satisfac- 
tory. 

Chain — We are still quoting prices 

"Hows: 1 inch, $6.50; 5-0 inch. 

V, 3-8 inch. $3.85; 7-16 inch, $3.7(1: 

1-2 inch, $3.-55; 9-16 inch, $3.J5; 5-S 

inch, $3.35; 3-4 inch, $3.25. 

Extersion and Step Ladders —Prices 
continue as follows: Step ladders 
at 10c. per foot for 3 to 6 feet, and 
lie. per foot for 7 to 10 feet ladder.-. 
Waggoner extension ladders, 40 per cent. 
off. 

Wiie Fencing — Preparations for 
a very large Spring business have been 
a ade, and booked orders are heavy. 
Poultry netting is in good de- 
mand, and barb and coil spring wire 
is also picking up. On galvanized wire 
we still quote: $2.42 1,2 t'.o.h. Cleveland. 

Wire NaLV-A good trade is being 
■ 'one for this season. We -till quote: 
$2.15 | er keg, f.O.b. Toronto. 

Cut Nails -- A satisfactory volume 
of business is being done. We quote: 
$2.40 pei kear, f.o.b. Toroi to. 

Horse Nails — Demand continues nor- 
mal with discounts the same. 

Horseshoes— Trade continues brisk: 
prices firm. We quote: P.B. base, $3.65; 
"M.R.M. Co.. latest improved pattern ! ' 
Iron shoes, right and medium pattern, 
No. 9 and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.05; snow No. 2 and larger. 
$4.05; No. 1 and smaller, $4.30; li-lit 
steel shoes. No. 2 and larger, $4.15: No. 
1 and smaller, $4.40; featherweight, all 
>i/.es. to -I, $5.75; toe weight, a'! sizes 
1 to 4. $7.00. If shipped from factory 
]r)t>. Ips«. 

Saddlery — Horse blankets and similar 
a-oods are having a seasonable sale, but 
sleigh bells have not been selling well 
because of absence of snow. i 

Rivets and Burrs — No price changes 
have been made, and trade is satisfac- 
tory for this season. 

Bolts and Nuts — Stocks are light and 
a heavy trade is looked for during the 
Spi ing, 

Cor:"age -Jute, Russian and Italian 



twines have been raised about half B 
cent ail through. For other lines 
we are still quoting: Manila, 15c.; 
British inanila. 11 l-2c; sisal, 10 l-2c. , 
double lathyarn, 10 l-2c; single lath- 
yarn, 10c; sashcord, "Hercules,'' 30c. 
to 32c; "Star," 36c; cotton twine. 
3-ply, 24c; 4-ply, 29c ; calking cotton, 
16 1-2 to 17c.; cotton waste, colored. 
(i 3-4c.; white, 9c. 

Cement— A normal business is report 
ed. We ouote: For carload orders 
I'.o.b. Toyonti . Canadian Portland, $1.90 
to $2.00; American Portland, $1.90 to 
$2.( 0. For small orders ex warehouse. 

Canadian Portland, $2.10, American 
Portland, +2.10. 

Firebrick — Prices continue unchanged; 
English and Scotch firebrick, 27c to 
30c; American low-grade, 22c to 25c: 
high-grade, 27 l-2c. to 37 l-2c. 

Building Paper— Manufacturers have 
been working on 1906 prices, and have 
advanced several times. 

Hides — The market has a still further 
downward tendency, but no quo! aide 
change is apparent. The conditions are 
still those of uncertainty, and little con- 
fidence is expressed by dealers. Arrivals 
are still in fair quantity, but no more 
than demand requires. Chicago shows 
no material strength, and the Canadian 
markel is Unaffected bv it at present 
moment. We quote : 

Hides, inspected, steers, No. 1 n 11 

No. 2 10 

cows, No. 1 101 

No. 2 09t 

Country hides, flat, per lb 09 09J 

Oalf skins, IN o. 1, selected 13 

" " No. 2 11 

Sheepskins 1 20 1 30 

Horse hides, No. 1 3 00 3 25 

Rendered tallow, per lb 04 04* 

Pnlled woola, super, per lb 22 C 24 

' " extra " 24 26 



Canadian Metal Markets. 

QUEBEC. 

office of Hardware ash Metajl, 
232 McGill Street, 

Montreal, Jan 19. !'.«»; 

So far as steel and iron are concerned, 
there has been no change to note during 
the week, except that in merchant bar 
iron, which has advanced $2.03. Pig 
iron, boiler tubes, shafting and all other 
grades of iron and steel, while maintain- 
ing the strength they have shown for 
some months, are not particularly active 
just now. 'I he only thing to oote is 
that one of the leading Canadian pro- 
ducers of pi" 1 iron, which was out of the 
market for some time, owing to repairs 
being necessary te its furnaces, is again 
. ii deck for orders and the furnaces hav- 
ing been relined, are now in commission. 

In sheet metals considerable activity 
has been shown during the week, owing 
to numerous advances made in many 
cases by the importers and in some 
others by the jobbing interests. Black 
sheets and black plates have both been 

advanced by the importers, but not suf- 
ficiently to cause any change in the dis- 
tributor's lists. On the other hand 
sheet /.in,- is much stronger than at last 
re| oris ami has been advanced a quarter 
it a cent. Owiii"- to the strength of 
-I elter it is also probable thai galvaniz- 

25 



ed iron will lie subject, to iucn 
prices in the near future. 

I;i LUgol metals, tin has been fhiol ual 
LUg considerably and while probably 

st longer than last wed, for Immediate 
deliveries, futures have been a shade 
wake r. This condition, however, is felt 
to be only a temporary one. Ai all 
events, the jobbing houses have ra 
their prices this week by a full cent. Pig 
lead is weaker, a decline id' 5c bi 
emoted, It is thoughl thai ibis also will 
recover strength. Ingot zinc, alter a 
period of remarkable strength, has again 

advanced in price a quarter of a - ■ 
and further advances are expected. 
Antimony continues on the upward mow 
and is now half a ( cut higher llian last 

week, with conditions decidedly in favor 
of further jumps. Other metals remain 
the same as last week. 

Canada Plattes -Prices have not yet 
been advanced, but the opinion is still 

freely expressed that revised lists will 
be published very soon. We still quote: 
52's, +2.(>o ; . (ib'_s, $2.65; 75 te, $2.75; 
full polished, $3.75^ galvanized, §2's, 
$4.10.; (id's. $4.:55. 

Copper— The same shortage, which has 
been frequently referred to in these col 
iimns, si ill exists and stocks everywhere 
are light. Local jobbers, who fortunate- 
ly were well stocked before price- ro,e, 
report that Jhey have had many in- 
iji.ii ies from unexpected quarters, and 
have been able to get their price from 
Ihese people, thus showing that the 
scarcity is a real one. We are still 
qiutittg: Ingol copper, 20 l-2c. to 21c; 
sheet copper, base sizes, 25c. 

Ingot Tin— Futures are reported to be 
slightly weaker, though only temporarily 
so. Immediate deliveries, however, are 
commanding higher figures than last 
week, and we are now quoting from 40 
P-2c. to 41c. 

Pig Lead- 'I he bottom seems at last 
to have been knocked out of the long 
lOtttimied advance in this metal, and the 
past week has developed a weakness 
which resulted in a decline in price of 
5c. We now ouote: $4.70 to $4.75 per 
hundred lbs. 

Boiler Tubes -The state of this mar- 
ket has been fully described in our open- 
ing remarks. We quote: British and 
American tubes, 1 1-2 inch. 8 l-2c: 2 
inch, 8 l-2c: 2 1-2 inch. 10c: 3 inch. 
12c; :: 1-2 inch, 15 3-4c; 4 inch, 20c; 
5 inch, 45c. Price per foot net. 

Pig Iron— There is not a greal deal of 
activity at present. Most of the orders 
received being for Spring delivery. We 
r.re qnoting: 

"Dom.," No. 1.819.50 to S20 oodelivered Montreal 
Usual difference in price for lower grades. 

Ferrona No. I Jig 50 deliverrd Montreal 

" No. a 19 oj 

No. 3 18 50 

No. 4 18.00 

Londonderry 20.50 

Carron No. 1 23.00 

" (special) 22 00 

Summerlee No. 1 23 50 

Clarence No. 1 20.r o 

No. 3 19 50 

Tool Steel — Our prices are: Colonial 
Black Diamond, 8c. to 9c: Sanderson's. 
8c. to 45c, according to grades Jessop's. 
13c; Jonas & Colver's. 10c. to 20c; 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



January 20, 1906 



"Air gardening," 65o. tut lb.-, i'on- 
qoeror, 7 l-2c. : Conqueror Bigh Speed 
Steel. 60o. 

Merchant Steel— The market remains 
steady at last week's juice-. We quote: 
Sleigh shoe, $2.17 L-2; tire, $2.27 1-2; 
spring, $2.75; toecalk, $2.82 1-2; ma- 
chinery iron finish, $2.27 1-2; ruled ma- 
chinery steel. $2.75; mild. $2.17 1-2 and 
upwards; square harrow tooth. $2.27 1-2. 
Net cash 30 days. Rivet steel quoted on 
application. 

Cold Rolled Shafting— We give the 
following prices: 3-16 inch, to 1-4 inch, 
$630; 5-16 inch, to 11-32 inch, $5.78; 
3-8 inch, to 1 7-32 inch, $4.76; 9-16 inch, 
to 47-64 inch. $4.08; 3 1-8 inch, to 3 7-16 
inch. $3.60; 3 1-2 inch, to 3 15-16 inch, 
$3,75; 4 inch, to 4 7-16 inch, $4.08; 4 1-2 
inch, to 4 11-16 inch, $4.42. 

Galvanized Iron— There is a strong 
feeling among the trade that recent ad- 
vances in all the metals which go to 
make up galvanized sheets, and especial- 
ly that of zinc, will force prices up also 
in galvanized. We are still quoting, 
lowever, as follows: Queen's Head, 
£S gauge, $4.25; 26 gauge, $4.00; 22 to 24 
gauge, $3.75; 16 to ?0 gauge, $3.50; 
Apollo, 28 gauge, $4.10; 26 gauge, $3.85- 
22 and 24 gauge, $3.85; 16 to 20 gauge, 
$3.50; Fleur-de-Lis. 28 °:auge, $4.10; 26 
gauge, $3.85; 22 to 24 gauge, $3.60; 16 
to 20 gauge, $3.35; Comet, 28 gauge, 
$4.10 to $4.35; 26 gauge, $3.85; 22 and 24 
gauge, $3.60; 16 to 20 gauge, $3.35; Bell 
brand. 28 gauge, $4.20 to $4.25; Gorbal's 
"Best Best," 28 gauge. $4.10. "Windmill 
Best," 28 gauge, $3.95; Sword and 
Torch, 28 gauge, $4.05 ; in less than case 
lots 25c. extra. 

Black Sheets — In common with all 
sheet metals, decided strength has been 
shown and metal experts are inclined to 
believe that higher prices must soon be 
asked. For the present we quote: 28 
gauge, $2.40; 26 gauge, $2.35; 22-24 
gauge, $2.30: 19-20 gauge, $2.30; 8-10 
gauge, $2.45. 

Antimony— As predicted in our last 
week's issue, another rise in price has 
been declared, and everything points to 
a long continued period of high quota- 
tions. We give: Toe. to 15 l-2c. for 
Cook son 's. 

Tin Plates — The market is very firm 
and in fact, so far as British product is 
concerned, it is altogether too firm, as 
one of the local importers pul it. Al- 
though prices have not been increased 
this week, we are inclined to expect it 
very soon. We are now quoting: 
Cokes, base size. 1C, 14 x 20, 
$4.00: charcoal, base size, 1C, 14 x 20, 
$4.25. 

Terne Plates— Our juices remain: 
$6.. 85. 

Ingot Zinc — Another advance declared 
during the week has left the market very 
strong at 7 l-2c. to 7 3-4c. 

Sheet Zinc— Prices in this metal have 
alee advanced, with conditions favorable 
11 higher prices. We quote: 8 l-4e. 
in cask-: S l-2c. in less than casks. 

Sheet Lead— We are quoting: 2 1-2 
lbs., 5 l-2e by the roll; 3 lbs. and heav- 
ier, 5 l-4c. by the roll ; small quantities 
25c. per hundred lbs. extra. 



Bar Iron— Another increase of 5c has 
been made during the past week, and our 
price now Is $2.05 t'.o.h. Montreal. 

Old Material— Practically no change 
ha- transpired in any of the metals. 
Wrought iron is about as inactive as be- 
fore, while cast iron is still in good de- 
mand. The rubber market is very quiet 
and few, or no. transactions have taken 
place during the past seven days. On 
the ocal market. old rubbers 

have declined l-2c. We are now 
quoting as follows: Copper ware, 14 
3-4c ; light copper, 13 3-4c. ; heavy red 
brass, 13c. ; yellow brass, 9 3-4c ; 
light brass, 7 l-2c. ; lead, 3c; zinc, 
4c; machinery cast scrap, $13; 
wrought scrap, $12; stove plate scrap, 
$11; mixed rags, 75c. to 90c per 100 lbs.; 
old rubbers, 7 l-4c. to 7 l-2c 



ONTARIO. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto January 19, 1906. 

While there is a good January busi- 
ness reported, and there are large book- 
ings of import orders for the first half 
of the year, there has been nothing ex- 
ceptional happen during the week. 

Prices have fluctuated somewhat, the 
net result being three changes. Bar 
iron is up to $2.05, an advance of $1.00 
per ton, ingot tin has dropped from 40c. 
to 39c, and antimony has jumped up 
from 15 l-2c to 16c. Other metals re- 
main stationary. 

Pig Iron— There is little business off- 
ering, but the mills are all booked ahead 
for several months. We still quote: 

Middlesboro, f.o.b, Toronto $22 50 

Hamilton, No. 1, at furnace 20 00 

" No. 2, " 19 50 

Midland, No. 1, " 20 00 

No. 2, " 19 50 

Radnor, at furnace 31 50 

Londonderry, f.o.b Toronto 2150 

Bar Iron— As predicted by us, prices 
have been moved up. We now quote 
$2.05 base, f.o.b., Toronto, with 
discount of 2 per cent, net cash. 

Ingot Tin— A drop of lc. is the fea- 
ture of the week. We now quote 39c 
per pound. 

Tin Plates— Jobbers report an active 
demand. Prices are firm. 

Galvanized Sheets— Conditions are un- 
changed, the demand being heavy at the 
same quotations. 

Brass— Recent advances in copper 
have been followed by higher quota- 
tions on brass. We, therefore, have to 
revise our quotations from 10 per cent, 
discount, to net list. 

Lead— The market is much firmer. We 
quote: Pig lead, $4.85 per 100 lbs., 
and bar lead, $5.00 per 100 lbs. 

Zinc Spelter— Prices hold steady, with 
demand fair. We quote: 7 l-2c 
per lb. for foreign and 5 1-2 to 5 3-4c. 
per lb. for domestic. 

Copper — Both sheet and ingot copper 
is firm, with stocks not very large. We 
quote as follows: Ingot copper, $20 
per 100 lbs., and sheet cooper, $25 per 
100 lbs. 

Antimony— An advance of another 1-2 
cent has been made and 16c. is now be- 
ing asked by local jobbers. 

26 



Old Material — Dealers' buying 
prices are: Heavy copper and wir°, 
IV. per lb.; light copper, 13c per lb.; 
heavy red brass, 13c per lb.; heavy 
yellow brass, lie. per lb.; light brass, 
8 l-2c. per lb.; tea lead, $3.00 per 100 
lbs.; heavy lead, $3.25 per 100 lbs.; 
^crap zinc, 4c per lb.; iron, No. 1 
wrought, $10.50, No. 2 wrought $3 to $5; 
machinery cast scrap, $15; stove plate, 
$10; malleable and steel, $5; old rub- 
bers, 7c to 7 l-4c per lb.; country mix- 
ed rags, 75c per 100 lbs. 

Coal— Prices keep very firm, and 
we still quote: Anthracite in cars 
at bridges, grate, $5.50 per gross 
ton; pea, $3.75 per gross ton. 

Standard Hocking, soft coal, in cars, 
f.o.b. at mines: Lump, $1.70; 3-4 inch, 
$1.60, run of mine, $1.40; nut, $1.25: 
N.P. and S., $1.00; slack, 75c; box cars 
10c per ton additional. 

Youehiogheny soft coal in cars, bond- 
ed at the bridges: 1 1-4 inch, $2.80; 3-4 
inch, $2.70; mine run, $2.60; slack, $2.35. 

For Manitoba, British Columbia and 
Maritime Provinces markets see pages 
following. 

UNITED STATES METAL MARKETS 

Advance proofs furnished Hardware and Metal by 
The Iron Age, January 18. 1906. 

Our Pittsburg correspondent reports 
that the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion has purchased from the Valley fur- 
naces 85,000 tons of Bessemer pip for de- 
livery during the first quarter at $17.25 
and also 40,000 tons for delivery during 
the second quarter at $17.75, Valley. 
Negotiations for about 50,000 tons addi- 
tional for the second quarter are pend- 
ing. When the latter purchase has been 
consummated practically all the surplus 
Bessemer and basic pig iron in the val- 
leys for the first half of this year will 
be out of the market. 

The cast iron pipe interests have been 
the heaviest buyers of pig iron lately. It 
is estimated that the consolidation has 
taken an aggregate of about 40,000 tons 
and the Massillon shop has bought 22,- 
000 tons, the greater part from southern 
furnaces. 

The general foundry trade has bought 
largely, and yet particularly for the 
second quarter prices are not quite as 
high as have been demanded lately and 
as are being freely paid for the first 
quarter delivery. 

There has been a feeling all along that 
difficulties in the transportation of raw 
material might during the Winter cause 
a squeeze in spot iron, and while the 
season thus far has been exceedingly fa- 
vorable all danger is not yet removed. 

There have been numerous reports of 
large transactions for American account 
in the English markets. None of these, 
can be confirmed on this side, and in 
view of relative prices seem impossible. 
The only exception, in which there may 
be an opportunity for importing pig 
iron, is in the case of low phosphorus 
iron, in which prices abroad and here 
are nearer and in which there is a short- 
age here. 

Rail makers have taken quite some 
additional tonnage. Among the larger 
orders are 20,000 tons for the Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad, which carries the total 
requirements of the svstem to close to 
200,000 tons, and 10,000 tons additional 
for the Gould lines. 



January 20, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



The structural shops are booking a 
good deal of work. A fair percentage of 
the capacity of the shops of the Sice! 
Corporation will be needed for the exten- 
sions and betterments of its own plants. 
Thus £,000 tons alone will be required 
for Homestead, and about 7,000 tons for 
Smith Chicago. Bethlehem has placed 
an order for 5,000 tons in Pittsburg, 
and the same shop, the McClintic-Mar- 
shall, has been awarded 1,500 tons for 
the Standard Steel Car Company, (i.OOIl 
tons for track elevation in Chicago, and 
12,000 tons of the tidewater work, the 
balance, 5,000 tons, going to another 
plant. Among other contracts are 3,800 
tons for the Franklin & Clearfield road, 
3,100 tons lor the M. K. & T. line and 
,',100 tons for the Lake Shore road. 

The material for another lake vessel 
has been placed in Chicago, and there 
has been some noteworthy covering by 
boiler manufacturers of requirements for 
the (list half of the year. 

The open Winter thus far has greatly 
encouraged work which calls for wire 
products, and the new orders and ship- 
ments continue at a rate extraordinary 
for this season of the year. The mills 
t bus far have been quite unable to ac- 
cumulate the stock for the Spring trade 
which they usually endeavor to do. To 
what extent this is counterbalanced by 
a disposition on the part of the trade to 
anticipate requirements it is difficult to 
gauge at the present time. 



LONDON METAL MARKETS. 

Pig Iron— Cleveland warrants are 
quoted at 54s. and Glasgow standard 
warrants at 52s. lOd, making prices as 
compared with last week 6d lower for 
Cleveland warrants and Id lower for 
standard warran ts. 

Tin— Spot tin opened weak at £164 5s., 
futures at £164 10s.. and after sales of 
150 tons of spot and 400 tons of futures 
closed easv at £163 15s. for spot and 
£164 5s. for futures, making price as 
compared with last week £1 15s. lower 
on spot and £1 12s. lower on futures. 

Copper— Spot copper opened easy at 
£78 15s., futures £77, and after sales of 
400 tons of spot and 800 tons of futures, 
closed easy at £78 5s. for spot and £76 
15s. for futures, making price as com- 
pared with last week. £1 7s. 6d lower on 
spot and £2 5s. lower on futures. 

Lead— The market closed at £16 10s., 
making price as compared with last week 
10s. lower. 

Spelter— The market closed at £27 15s. 
making prices as compared with last 
week, £1 10s. lower. 



1905 METAL MARKET REVIEW. 

From S. W. Royse & Co.'s (Manches- 
ter, England) report dated December 29, 
1905, we take the following review of 
the English metal markets during the 
year just closed : 

Pig iron opened firm after advancing 
strongly during the last quarter of 1904, 
but fell away during January-February, 
rallying again in March-April,- and de- 
clining steadily until late July, when 
the lowest prices of the year were reach- 
ed ; since then there has been a steady 
advance of 8s. 6d. to 9s. 3d. per ton, or 
an improvement of 3s. to 5s. since the 
beginning of the year. During this 



month there has been a steady business, 
but prices have latterly eased some- 
what ; the general position is, however, 
considered satisfactory, although Cleve- 
land stocks of pig iron have increased 
over half a million tons during the last 
twelve months. Copper has had an ex- 
traordinary year, declining steadily some 
£4 His. per ton during the first five 

months, since which there has been a 
steady appreciation until early Novem- 
ber, and then a rapid rise to present 
level of £15 above the lowest of the 
year. There is a strong consumptive de- 
mand, and a confident expectation that 
the position will be at least maintained 
for some time to come. Tin has ad- 
vanced steadily since late January and 
very strongly during the last two 
months, the total rise being £28 during 
the year or £46 during the last eighteen 
months. The price is now not much be- 
low the highest record of £168 10s. in 
1888, and the demand continues strong. 
Spelter is £3 10s. dearer during the 
year and is strong, but has varied but 
little during the last two months. Lead 
is about £3 dearer during the last two 
months, or £5 dearer during the year, 
and is quite firm. 

The following table shows the fluctua- 
tions in values during the year : 



over the number built in 1904. The fol- 
lowing shows the estimate of cars built 
during the last seven years: 1899, 121,- 
191; 1!)00, 117.267; L901, 139,005; L902, 
L64.547; 1903, 154.sos ; nun, 62,950; 
L905, 168,006. 

Official returns from all of the 
motive builders in the United States 
and Canada, show 5,49] new locomotives 
built in 1005, as againsl 3,441 built in 
L904. Like the car total, this does not 
include locomotives built by railroaods 
in their own shops, nor does it include 
orders given for repairs or rebuilding. 
Of the total number of locomotives re 
ported built, 140 were electric locomo- 
tives for last year. Of the total, 583 
were for export, and 4,896 for .domestic 
use, including 177 compound locomo- 
tives. The locomotives built this year 
exceed I h r total for any previous year. 
r l he nearesi number was in 1003. when 

there were 5,151 locomotives built. 

THE DIVINE WATER MOTOR. 

The Smith & licmenway Co., New 
York, have taken the exclusive sale of 
the Divine water motor. A number of 



Scotch Warrants 
Cleveland " 
Copper, G.M.B. 

Straits Tin 

Spelter 

Lead, foreign .. 
" English .. 



Prices 

at beginning 

of 1905 



£■ 

2 
2 

68 
134 

25 



12 17 

13 2 



Prices 

at close of 

year. 



£■ »• d. 

2 18 6 

2 13 1054 

79 5 

162 12 6 

28 15 

17 17 6 

18 2 6 



Highest prices 


in 


1905 




£; 


s. 


d. 


2 


18 


9 


2 


14 


6 


80 


5 





166 


5 





28 


17 


6 


17 


17 


6 


18 


2 


6 



Lowest prices 
in 1905. 



£• 

2 

2 

64 

130 



23 10 

11 18 

12 1 



CAR CONSTRUCTION IN 1905. 

The year 1905 has been a record one, 
both for car builders and locomotive 
builders, says the R.ailroaod Gazette. 
Official returns from all of the car build- 
ing plants in the United States and Can- 
ada, with the exception of one of the 
smaller builders the output of which has 
been estimated from current record, 
show that 168,006 cars were built during 
1905, including cars for use on subway 
and elevated railroaods, but exclusive of 
street and interurban electric cars. These 
figures do not include ears built by rail- 
roads in their own shops, of which an 
exceptionally large number have been 
built this year. Of the above total 165,- 
455 are for freight service and 2,551 are 
for passenger service, 162,701 are for 
domestic use and 5.305 are for export. 
This is the largest car output in any one 
year on record, and is considerably more 
than double the total output for last 
year, which was 62,950. The next larg- 
est oiitput for any one year was in 1902, 
when a total of 164,547 ears were built. 

During the past three months, the car 
companies have booked some record- 
breaking orders. The majority of these 
are for 1907 delivery J and among them 
are orders from two of the leading rail- 
roads, which alone amount to almost as 
many cars as the total output in 1904 
During the year, 2.164 cars were built by 
firms in Canada, an increase of 222 cars 

27 



changes have been made and it will 
hereafter be known as the Divine red 
devil water motor, and finished in car- 
mine red, packed with blue burring 
wheel, a bevelled emery wheel, a cake of 
polish, pulley and a bracket for holding 
articles to grind or polish. 

Some of the improvements which have 
been made are extending the width of 
the case so as to not have any back 
motion in discharging the water, reduc- 
ing the size of their buckets, and put- 
ting a wing nut on instead of an ordin- 
ary square nut as has been used hereto- 
fore. These improvements make the 
motor very much more durable. On an 
80-pound pressure it develops 5,300 
revolutions to the minute. 

The motor is now so strong that it 
will drive successfully a jeweler's lathe, 
a 12-in. blower for blacksmiths and 
jewelers, as well as artizans, a sewing 
machine for household purposes, and 
will grind axes, hatchets, chisels, 
planes, knives of all descriptions, and 
scissors, run an ice cream freezer, or 
can be used for grinding all kinds of 
small tools. 



N. A. Timmons, head of the Larose 

mines, in the Cobalt district, has 
nounced that his company proposes to 
establish a $250,000 smelter near their 
mines. I 

Four customs plants to be operated 
on the Kingsley process of extracting 
metals from ores direct, are to be estab- 
lished in the Cobalt district. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware and Metal Conditions in Manitoba. 

(Market quotations corrected by telegraph up to 12 a.m. Friday, Jan 19, 1906.) 

Offloe of Hardware and Metal 

Room 511, Union Bank Building, 

Winnipeg, Man 



Hardware and metal lines have been 
quiel during t lie past week, (bough 
there are signs thai the expected 
Spring trade is commencing, and in Eacl 
some houses stale that they are even 
now busy on Spring orders. With the 
exception of cue or two articles, prices 
are unchanged. Barhed wire has been 
rut ten rents, tlhe result of. the throw- 
ing upon the market by an Independent 
American concern of a large quantity 
of wire It is not expected that the 
1 i ice will hold at this reduction. 

Game Traps^A few game traps arc 
still selling:. Prices are unehanged. We 
quote : 

H. & N., discount 50 and 5 p.c. 

Victor, •' 66?$ p.c. 

Newhouse, 35 P c - 

Bear $7 each 

Lanterns— The market is "open" and 
it is hard to quote with anything ap- 
proaching to exactitude. The average 
prices are about as follows: 

Cold blast lanterns 55 25 per doz. 

Coppered cold blast lanterns 7 25 

Cold blast dash 7 75 

Lift Lanterns 4 25 

Bluestone— Price for 1906 delivery is 
$0.50 per cwt. 

Wire— Prices are steady. We quote: 

Barbed wire, ioo lb 82 90 

Plain galvanized, 6 to 8.. S3 39 9.. Si 50 2 90 

10 3 50 12. . 3 10 

13 3 20 14.. 3 90 

15 4 45 16.. 4 60 

Plain twisi 3 00 

Staples S 50 

Oiled ann-a'ed wir>-, tr . . $2 96 u . $ 1 02 

'" is . . 3 10 13 . . 3 20 

14 3 50 ■'■■ 3 45 
Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horseshoes— Prices have been steady 

since the recent advance in steel shoes. 
Quotations are as follows: 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 S4 65 

No. 2 and larger .... 4 40 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 490 

No. a and larger 4 65 

Steel , No . o to No. 1 5 00 

No. 2 and 'arper 4 75 

Horsenails— Discounts arc as follows: 
"C" brand, 40, 10 and 7 1-2 per cent., 
"M" brand and other brands, 55 and 
B0 per cent. Add 15c. per box. 

Wire Nails— The price has been steady 

since the recent decline to $2.60 per keg. 

Cut Nails — Price. $3.00 per keg, base 

price. None selling because of the low 

price of wire nails. 

Pressed Spikes— Prices are firmly held 
at following quotations: 

Pressed spikes, Ji x 5 and 6 $4 60 

" 5-6x5, 6 and 7 4 25 

H x6,7 and 8 4 10 

7-16 x 7 ard 9 4 00 

% x 8, 9, 10 and 12 3 90 

" ii x to and T2 3 •?<. 

Screws— No change i" price. Demand 
continues brisk at following unchanged 
discounts: 
Screws, flat head, Iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 



Nuts and Bolts— Discounts are un- 
changed and continue as follows: 

Bolts, carriage, H or smaller 60 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, ft and under 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and over 55P-C. 

Bolts, tire 65 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 p. c. 

Sleigh shoe bolts 65 and 10 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 pc. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2}<c. " 

Hex " case lots 3c. " 

smaller lots 2iic. " 

Rivets— Discounts continue as follows: 

Rivets, iron 60 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

No. 12 37 

Coil Chain— Unchanged in price. We 
quote: 



Coil chair — 








3-16 inch . . 


•■ St 25 


M inch . 


. . $7 20 


5-16 inch . . 


5 20 


H inch . . 


. . 4 60 


7-16 inch . . 


• 4 45 


% inch . . 


•• 4 30 


}i inch . . 


. 4 10 


it inch . . 


. . 4 00 



Shovels— Discounts on spades and 
shovels continue 40 and 5 per cent. 

Harvest Tools— Discounts are now 60 
and 5 per cent. 

Axe Handles— Quoted as follows: 

Axe handles, turned, s g.hickory, doz .. .. 83 15 

No. 7 . 1 90 No. 3 160 

Octagon ex tip. 230 No. 1 160 

Axes— Prices are quoted as follows: 

Bench axes, discount off list 40 p.c. 

Broad " " 25 p.c. 

Royal Oak. per doz 5 6.25 

Maple Leaf, " 8.25 

Model " 8.50 

Black Prince " 7.25 

Black Diamond " 9.25 

Standard Flint Edge, per doz 8.75 

Copper King, per doz 900 

Columbian, " 10.75 

Handled axes, North Star, per doz 7.75 

Black Prince, per doz 9.25 

' Standard Flint Edge, per doz.. 10.50 
Copper King, per doz 11. co 

Butts — The discount on wrought iron 
hutts is 70 per cent. 

Churns — The discounts from list prices 
are 45 and 5 per cent. 

Chisels- Quoted at 70 per cent, off list 
prices. 

Auger Bits — Discount on common 
auger bits is 65 per cent. 

Blocks — Discount on steel blocks is 
35 per cent, off list prices; on wood, 55 
per cent. 

Fittings — Discounts are quoted as fol- 
lows: 

Wrought Couplings 60 p.c. 

Nipples 65 and 10 p.c. 

T'sand elbows 10 p.c. 

Malleable bushings 50 p.c. 

Malleable unions 60 p.c. 

Grindstones- The price is now 1 3-4e. 
per lb. 

Fork Handles— The discount is 40 per 
cent, from list prices. 

Hinges— The discount in light "T" 
and strap hinges is 65 per cent, off list 
prices. 

Hooks— Prices are quoted as follows: 

Brush hooks, heavy per doz $8 75 

Grass per doz 170 



Draw Knives— The discount is 70 per 
cent, from list prices. 

Rules— Discounts are 50 and 10 per 
cent. 

Washers — On small quantities the dis- 
count is 35 per cent.; on full boxes it is 
40 per cent. 

Wringers— Prices are as follows: 

Royal Can idi in per d z S30 00 

R. B , per doz 3^75 

Files— Discounts are quoted as fol- 
io vvs : 

" Arcade " 75 p.c. 

" Black Diamond " 60 p.c. 

" Nicholson's " 62V4 p.c. 

Building Paper— The big rush is of 

course over, but there is still a steady 

sale at unchanged prices. We quote : 

Joliette, plain 40c. 

'' tarred 65c. 

Cyclone, plain 55c. 

tarred 80c. 

Anchor, plain ."".... 55c. 

1 ' tarred 65c. 

Pure fibre, plain 6o.\ 

" " tarred 80c. 

Tinware, Etc.— We quote again as fol- 
lows: 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 ana 10 p.c. 

plain 75 and 2 % p.c. 

pieced 30 p.c. 

Japanned ware 37H p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 p.c. 

" Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Cordage — The price is steady since the 
recent advance. We quote as follows. 

K , ■()• . sisa! .716 and latgci . basis ...... 11 2; 

vi ,mim - 16 and Ur^n , basis 15 75 

1 ..till varn 11 25 

Solder— Quoted now at 24c. per lb. 
with concessions for large quantities. 
Vises— Prices are quoted as follows: 

" Peter Wright,'' 30 to 34 4^4c. per lh 

35 l ° 39 >4 • 

40 aim largi-r >3i4c. 

Anvils— •' Peter Wright" anvils are 
selling at lie per lb. 

Power Horse Clippers— The "1902" 
power horse clipper is selling at $12, 
and the "Twentieth Century" at $8 
The "1904" sheep shearing machines 
are sold at $13.60. 

Ammunition, Etc.— Prices and dis- 
counts are unchanged. We quote: 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 

50 and 5 p.c. 

Dominion, C. F. , pistol 30 p.c. 

" military 20 p.c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, American R.F. 33ft p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 P-c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Dominion Eley's and Kynoch's soft, 
12 gauge. 

black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 1750 

soft, 10 gauge 19 50 

chilled, io gauge 20 50 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 ib 700 

Chilled 7 5° 

Powder, F.F., keg, Hamilton 4 75 

F F <~i., Dupont's. ' 00 

Iron and Steel — Prices are quoted as 
follows: • 

Bar iron (basis) a 60 

Swedish iron (basis) 4 75 

Sleigh shoe steel 2 75 

Spring stee". 3 2 5 

Machinery steel 3 So 

Tool steel , Black Diamond , 100 lb 9 50 

Jessop 13 °o 



28 



January 20, 1906 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



WINDOW GUARDS, 






OFFICE RAILING, 






IRON GATES, 




WIRE 


FENCING, 
COAL SCREENS, 

SPRING BEDS 






AND MATTRESSES 


MUNRO WIRE WORKS, 


Limited 


WINNIPEG, MAN 


NEW GLASGOW, N.S 





ARTISTS' MATERIALS 

AND ARCHITECTS' SUPPLIES, ETC. 

We carry a complete line of WINSOR & NEWTON'S 
and other leading manufacturers' goods in stock. Ask for 
our new catalogue. 

THE WINNIPEG PAINT AND GLASS CO., LIMITED 

WINNIPEG. CANADA 



WINNIPEG CEILING and ROOFING CO. 



Manufacturers of 



Corrugated Roofing and Siding, Metal 

Ceilings, Cornices, Etc. 

WINNIPEG, - MAN. 



Standard Lanterns 
for 1906 — ■ 



Banner Cold Blast Lantern (See New Design) 
Leader Cold Blast Lantern, 
Climax Safety Tubular Lantern, " 



SAMPLES OF ABOVE READY FEBRUARY 1ST. 
Forsale by all prominent jobbers of Hardware and Crockery. 

The " Banner" and " Leader" Lanterns are both warranted Wind-proof, 
and, as usual, surpass all others for quality and construction. 

MANUFACTURED BY 



ONTARIO LANTERN AND LAMP CO., L 



IMITED 



Hamilton, Ont. 



Black Sheets — No change in price. We 
quote as before: 

Black Sheets, 10 to 16 gauge, ioo lb 3 5° 

18 to 32 gauge • 3 75 

24 gauge 3 90 

26 gauge 4 00 

28 gauge 4 10 

Galvanized Iron— The market is 

steady at the recent advance. We 
quote : 

Apollo, 16 gauge 3 90 

18 and 20 gauge 410 

k2 and 24 gauge 4 45 

26 gauge 4 40 

28gauge 4 65 

30 gauge or 10 X oz 4 95 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 60 

26 gauge 4 65 

38 " 490 



Tin Plates— We now quote as follows: 
Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x ab, box .... o so 

*< TV II 

IX II 50 

XXI 13 5°- 

Terne Plates— Quoted at $9.00. 

Canada Plates— Wo quote: 

Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 * 24 3 50 

Canada plate, 20 x 28 3 75 

Canadaplate, full polished 4 25 

Sheet Zinc-The price is now $8.50 
for cask lots, and $9.00 for broken lots. 

Pig Lead— Pnr lead is now quoted at 
$5.00. " 

Iron Pipe— Prices are still quoted as 
follows : 

29 



PAINTERS' 
SUPPLIES 



Stephens line of Painters' 
Supplies and Tools have a 
distinguished popularity 
among both dealers and 

painters. 

Never have we had such a 
large and well assorted 
stock. 

Prices are right — this 
class of trade is always a 
profitable one to handle. 

If you have not already 
received a copy of our 
ILLUSTRATED TRADE CATALOGUE, 
write at once ; we would like 
to send it to you at our 
expense. 

It contains 94 pages, illus- 
trating and describing the 
most complete line of 
PAINTERS' SUPPLIES in Western 
Canada. 

We are sure that this 
catalogue would be a great 
help to you when ordering 
by mail. 

Write for Catalogue " D " 

WRITE TO-DAY 



G.F. STEPHENS & CO, 

LIMITED 

WINNIPEG, CANADA 



Hardwire and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



January 20, 1906 



Black iron pipe, H inch 

* " » 5 

Black iron pipe, H inch 2 85 

* " 3 '5 

a 4 co 

1 5 75 

iK " 7 8s 

lX 9 40 

2 " 13 90 

Petroleum and Gasoline— Frices arc 
quoted now us follows: 

Silver Mar, per gal 2l'/ic. 

Sunlight " v2j4c. 

Eocene '" 2454c. 

Pennoline " 2$%c. 

Crystal Spray " 24 Vic. 

Silver Light 22MC 

Gasoline, 7^-72 (Engine) 25V4C. 

( In barrels f.o.b. Winnipeg.) 

Paints, Oils and Turpentine — There is 
flu averajre trade for the present sea- 
son. Prices nre steady. We quote: 

White lead (pure) 46 5 > 

Bladder putty, in bbls o 02 V4 

" in kegs o 02 Ji 

Turpentine, pure in ban-els 1 00 

Less than barrel lots 1 09 

Linseed oil, raw o 64 

Boiled o 67 

Window Glass— We quote: 

16-oz. O.G , single, lu 50-I1. boxes — 

16 to 25 united inches 82.25 

26 to 40 2 40 

16-oz. O.G., single, in 100-ft. cases — 

16 to 25 united inches 4.00 

26 to 40 4.25 

41 to 50 4.75 

51 to 60 5.25 

61 to 70 5.75 

21-oz C.S., double, in 100-ft. cases — 

26 to 40 united inches 7.35 

41 to 50 8.40 

51 lo 60 9.45 

61 to 70 10.50 

71 to 80 H-55 

81 1c 85 " 12.60 

86 to 90 14.75 

161095 1730 

6 t ■ ico 



Nova Scotia Trade News 

Halifax, N.S., Jan. 17, 1906. 

Trade has not improved any since last 
report. The jobbers are still busily en- 
gaged in taking stock, and expect to be 
so until the end of the present month. 
The travelers are on the road again af- 
tei the holidays, bui so far the orders 
Coming in are very small. Collections 
.iic .1 pood average, and the firms are 
pleased with 1 he outlook. .Most of the 
jobbers have placed their orders for 
Spring goods, and all of them have 
booked t licit orders for import. In 
some cases the goods are now on the 
way from foreign parts. 

Prices have undergone a considerable 
change of late, as the following will 
show, all being very recent advances on 
this market : 

Linseed oil, raw 57c boiled, 60c. 

Knglish coil chain— \, $5 , 5-16, $4.10 ; 
2, $3.90 ; 7-1 (i, $T80 ; A, $3.70 
>0 ; ^, $3.40. 

Sheet iron— Hi gauge, *2.75 1 18x2n, 
$2.35 ; 22x21. $2. Hi , 20, $2.55. 

Sheet lead— 'i p. and heavier. $5.75 ; 
. *6. 

Sheet sine— Casks; $8.25 : less than 
casks, $8.75. 

Glass— Up to 25-in., $2.10 ; 2(i to lo- 
in., $2.20 ; 11 to 50-in.i $2.80 ; 51 to 
60-in., $3 ; 61 to 70-in., $3.50. 

Wire nails, base, $2.25. 



Tarred felt, per 100, $2 Readj roof- 
ing. 2-ply, per roll, 95c ; 3-ply, $1.20. 
Wire edge rooiing, 2-ply j $1.25; 3-ply, 
$1.50, 



West Prince, P E.I., Hoard of Trade 
lias fallen in line with the request of the 
Halifax board, and adopted a resolution 
i- ash the Federal Government for a 

bonus of $6 per ton on all steel ships 
built in Canada. 



When the Tariff Commission visited 
New Glasgow last week, the greater 
part of the sitting was occupied with 
healing the case of the Nova Scotia 
Steel & Coal Company, which was pre- 
sented by Harvey Graham and Thomas 
Cantley. After referring to the extent 
of the steel industry in this province, 
they asked that the Government boun- 
ties of 1905 be continued for two years 
before applying to reductions as per 
the present schedules. Delegates from 
the Standard Drain Pipe Company ask- 
ed for a specific, in place of an ad valo- 
rem duty on certain kinds of sewer pipe, 
and for the Humphrey Glass Co. ask- 
ing that glass molds be made free. A 
representative of the Bailey-Underwood 
Co. asked for certain changes in the 
tariff on certain grades of steel used in 
the manufacture of springs. The I. 
Alathcson Co., Limited, expressed satis- 
faction with the present tariff on boil- 
ers and tubes, hut asked for a reduction 
on certain kinds of corrugated iron fur- 
naces not made in Canada. 



New Brunswick Trade News 

St. John, K-.-B., -Ian 15, 1906. 
Trade conditions generally are satis- 
factory in the local hardware world 
just now. Travelers report good orders 
and retailers state that business is 
such as to cause them to feel little 
worry. The openness of the Winter 
weather so far has, of course, been fav- 
orable to business, and as "times" are 
good it is but to be expected that trade 
conditions should be of the kind to be 
viewed with complacency. The feature 
of the hardware market at present is, 
above all else, the prevailing firmness 
and- the evident tendency to higher 
prices. The firmness lias been quite 
fittingly described as remarkable bj 
more than one well informed man, for 
it has not often been more noticeable. 



New prices have gone into force in 
wire fencing recently. The advance or- 
dered has the effect of bringing the 
price of this commodity up above those 
prevailing last year. Two dollars and 
fifty-five cents when carload lots are se 
cured, and about two dollars and sixty 
live cents in broken quantities, are the 
quotations now given. As previously 
noted here, the demand for wire fencing 
is showing a marked increase yearl\ . 
and, of course, this increase is not sur- 
prising. The agents of the Page Com- 
pany are understood to have done ex- 
cellent business in this territory during 
the past season, and the same is true 
of those who represent the Frosl con- 
cern. 

• • 

The St. John Iron & Hardware As 

sociation has recently elected its offi- 

30 



ccrs For the year 190b', The men chosen 
to fill the various positions are: I'resi 
dent, Mr, John keefe; \ ice president , 
Mr. W. S. Fisher; secretar3 treasurer, 
.Air. John J. Harry; directors, \lessi>. 
W. II. Thorite, Thomas Mc.\\it\. M . K. 
Agar; executive committee, the officers 
and Messrs. \\ . 1|. Thorne, Thomas Ale- 
Avitv. and Miles E, Agar. The associ- 
ation will hold its annual dinner on 
January 26. 



The demand for horseshoes has been 
good of late. This was to be expected 
and, consequently, is not causing any 
comment. But the unusually stiff tig 
tires at which horseshoe nails are sell 
ing is indeed a source of comment. In 
the past month or so the quotations 
for these nails have been advanced a 
dollar and a half. This in itself is 
something decidedly out of the ordinary 
but the fact that there is still an evi- 
dent tendency to higher prices makes 
this state of affairs somewhat more 
surprising. 



Lead is still going upward in price. 
Two advances have been noted in a 
comparatively short time. 

liar iron has also advanced twice of 
late. It is now firm with a tendency 
upward manifesting itself. Black sheet 
iron is also tending to higher figures. 
It is now q noted at figures about 25 
per cent, above those given earlier in 
the season. 

White lead, linseed and turpentine are 
all showing the tendency to higher 
prices. 



IT PAYS TO ACCOMMODATE. 

There is nothing people appreciate 
more than being served by those who 
really enjoy accommodating them. What 
a comfort, at a strange hotel especial- 
ly, to be served by those who seem 
anxious to please us, who seem to take 
real pleasure in making us feel at home 
and comfortable ! There is no one qual- 
ity which will help youth along more 
rapidly than the cultivation of this de- 
sire to please, to accommodate. It ap- 
peals to everybody ; it creates a good 
impression. 

What a pleasure and a comfort, when 
traveling, to be served by pleasant, 
good-natured people who tr- to please 
us ! A surly, impudent Pullman porter 
often destroys the pleasure of a whole 
journey on a train. An impudent clerk 
in a hotel office can make everybody in 
the house uncomfortable, and such ser- 
vice is dear, even if it could be had for 
nothing. 

It is noticeable that a boy who always 
tries to help wherever he can, and to 
make everybody comfortable, who is ac- 
commodating in everything, is very pop- 
ular, and other things being equal, most 
likely to be promoted. 



TRADE INQUIRIES. 

Correspondents dc^irin^ to gvt in touch with an\ of 
the firms referred to should quote the reference numbei 
when requesting addresses For information write to 
Superintendent of Commercial Agencies. Department of 
Trade and Commerce, Ottawa. 

10. A Belgian ^lass manufacturer 
would be fflad to obtain the address of 
liny Canadian importer interested in 
this commodity. 



•v 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES AND BOOKLETS 

When sending catalogues for review, manu- 
facturers would confer a favor by pointing out 
the new articles that they contain. It would 
assist the editor in writing the review, 



' < 



Useful Year Book. 

"Surety Sayings" is the tit If of a 
convenient red cloth-bound year booJs 
issued by United States Fidelty & <luar 
antv Company, of Baltimore, Md., for 
which A. E. I\ irk pat tick is Canadian 
manager, with offices at ii Colborhe 
street, Toronto. The book provides a 
blank page for every day "f the year at 
the top of whieh appears a quotation; 
each quotation makes a pointed allu- 
sion to the surety business. Occasion- 
ally a cartoon is inserted with the same 
object. The book is about as clever a 
production in its line as could be im- 
agined. 

Trophies and Prize Cups. 

The Toronto Silver Plate Company, 
Toronto, are making a specialty of 

trophies, prize cups and designs, and 
some very line illustrations of silver 
plate made by them are shown in cata- 
logue Xo. 20, which should be in the 
hands of every hardware merchant. K 
will be sent on request if this paper is 
mentioned. 

Jones' 1906 Price List. 

The 1). F. .Jones Mfg. ( ompany, tian- 
anocpue, have issued in catalogue form 
their 1906 price list of shovels, spades, 
scoops, draining- tools, etc. Dealers 
who desire a copy should mention this 
paper when sending for one. 

Reliance Water Boilers. 

A very neat catalogue has been issued 
by the A. ('. Thompson Company, 
North Sydney, N.S., describing the 
good features of their Reliance water 
boilers, which they consider the best mi 
the market. Sectional cuts of the vari- 
ous parts of the boiler are shown, each 
part beinsj- described very minutely. The 
company also manufactures stoves, 
ranges, soil pipe, etc. If Hardware and 
Metal is mentioned the company will 
probably be glad to send catalogues and 
give other information regarding their 
products 



"Marguerite." 

E. ('. Atkms & Co., Indianapolis, 
lnd., and Toronto, have sent their cus- 
tomers as a New Year's greeting a Large 
picture entitled "Marguerite.'' together 
with a neatly printed and well worded 
circular. Those being sent to the trade 
have an advertisement of the firm on 
the bottom, but others are procurable 
without lettering- by remitting 50c. t<. 
cover cost of picture, postage, ete. Men- 
tion Hardware and .Metal if a eopy is 
sent f oi- 
Beautiful Calendar Free. 

The Horton Mfg. Company, Bristol, 
Conn., are offering one of their 1906 
calendars free to any hardware dealer 
who clips the coupon in their advertise- 



Metallic" F"ront:s 

Suggest a "Metallic" Front to your neighbor for that new 
building. 

Pages 384 to 399 of our Catalogue show styles that cannot 
fail to please him and reveal to him possibilities in Sheet Metal 
work he never thought of. A quick sale at a good profit will 
surely be the result. 

We make up these fronts in a great variety of beautiful 
designs. 

Nothing is too simple or too intricate for us to undertake. 

New trade and extra profits are in store for live dealers 
who don t overlook the local possibilities of " Metallic " building 
materials. 



OUR NEW We have just issued the most complete 

$10 OOO Catalogue ever offered to the Metal Trade. 

' It is a veritable encyclopaedia of all that's 

CATALOGUE practical and beautiful in the Art Manipu- 
lation of Sheet Metal. Book contains 440 pages, superbly 
bound and illustrated. We send it tree upon request, to 
any builder, contractor or dealer of responsibility. 

THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. 

OF CANADA, Limited 

(Established Twenty Years I 

Toronto and Winnipeg 



We also manufacture: 

" Eastlake " Metallic Shingles 

" Metallic " Ceilings and Wall Plates 

" Metallic " Cornices, Skylights and 

Ventilators 
" Metallic" Siding, (Stone.Brick, etc.) 
"Impervia" Fireproof Windows 
" Empire" Metallic Shingles 
" Metallic " Crestings and Finials 
"Metallic" Corrugated Iron 
"Hayes" Metallic Lathing 
" Metallic " Eavetrough and Conductor 

Pipe 
" Metallic" Pressed Zinc Ornaments 
" Richardson's " Pressed Metal Doors 

and Sheet Metal Building Materials 

of every description. 

402 



ment and sends it on their letterhead to 
the above address. The illustration 
shows a pretty fishing' scene, appropri- 
ate to the "Bristol" rods made by this 
company. 

Canada Paint Calendar. 

A good combination of ornament and 
advertisement is the I90f> calendar of 
the Canada Paint Co. It is in the shape 
of a long panel, 3(ixl l inches in size, 
and the dates are printed so boldly as 
to be readable for a long distance. A 
beautifully lithographed representation 
is given of a sailor in regulation uni- 
form on a seat suspended from above, 
painting the sides of a great liner with 
C. P. Co.'s black marine paint. This 
calendar is noteworthy for the almost 
unconscious manner in which it presents 
its advertisement. 

Estey & Co.'s Reminder. 

Estey & Co., St. John, N.B., selling 
agents tor steel and metal of all kinds, 
have issued a prellj calendar, cata- 
loging the various lines they handle. 
A colored reproduction of the famous 
painting, "The Smithy," will entitle 
(his calendai to a place on any wall, 
and Estey & Go. will be pleased to send 
it to anyone in the trade who mentions 
Hardware and .Metal in requesting it. 



Lcckerby & McComb's Calendar. 

Lovers of the beautiful will be greatly 
pleased b\ the line calendar which Loek- 
erbj a McComb, manufacturers of build- 
ing paper, Montreal, are now sending to 
their customers. The striking feature of 
this calendar is the fact that the high 
coloring, while adding to its beauty, al- 
so marks it out (list mctlv from all oth- 
ers. The background is green, enframing 
a dainty sample of feminine beauty ar- 
rayed in red gown and hat. Anyone 
who has not yet received this calendar 

31 



will be supplied with one on request, 
Please mention this paper in writing for 
the calendar. 



Red Sheet Packing. 

The Canadian Fairbanks Co;, Mont- 
real, are offering: to send a sample of 
their red sheet packing- to hardware 
dealers who clip coupon in their adver- 
tisement on anothei page 



THE YANKEE SNAP. 

One of the most important improve^ 
ments in the Covert Manufacturing Com- 
pany's line of goods is the brass lever 
spring used exclusively in their Yankee 
snaps. The sectional view of the body 
and hook of one of their Yankee snaps 
accompanying this article illustrates am] 




Yankee Snap with Brass Lever Spring. 

demonstrates the practical advantages 
nf tins great improvement. No other 
snap manufactured possesses this inval- 
uable feature. It is practically indes- 
tructible, and will remain unimpaired as 
long as the snap lasts. When writing 
the Covert Manufacturing ('ompany, 
Troy, X.Y., mention this paper. 



'1 he man who never does the thing- he 
|;ut> (iff until to-morrow ought to put 
i t'( until then tin thing he ought not t.> 
do tc-day. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 



THE BUSINESS SITUATION IN CANADA 

Mr. Byron E. Walker at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian 

Bank of Commerce. 

The thirty-ninth annual meeting of the Shareholders of the Canadian Bank of Commerce was eminently satisfactory, 
for they had a most pros/>erous year. The directors' report showed, in addition to a balance of $28,726 39 from last year, 
net profits ot SI ,370,167 63, premiums on new stock $564,996 63, so that, in addition to paying dividends at 7 per cent, to 
the amount of $666,784 27, writing oil' bank premises $219,233.99 and transferring to the Pension Fund $25,000, there 
remained $1,000,000 to be transferred to the Rest Account, together with a balance forward of $58,871.76. The reserve 
fund is now $4,500,000 and the capital $10,000,000. 

The feature of the gathering and the talk in Canadian financial circles was the address of the General Manager, Mr. B. 
E. Walker It is probably the best review of the business situation in Canada that has ever been presented. We publish his re- 
marks in full This address, taken in connection with Lord Strathcona's recent prophesy of a population of 80,000,000 for 
Canada within the century, is flattering to Canadian sentiment and should encourage a conservative investment in both 
public and private enterprises of a permanent character. 



GENERAL .MANAGER'S ADDRESS. 

In reviewing the business situation a 
year ago we found it 'a much more dif- 
ficult task than usual because oif the 
very varying state of many of the fac- 
tors which influence our progress. We 
began the yea.r 1904 expecting some 
curtailment of a prosperity which had 
perhaps lasted too long without a check. 
But although the results from the for- 
est, from agriculture, pasturage and hail- 
ing, were all less than we had hoped, 
the end of the year found us prosperous 
and more confident than ever. Beyond a 
doubt, however, we were spending money 
in all matters, public and private, on 
an unexampled scale for this "Tsually 
prudent and economical! country, and 
nothing but large results from industry 
for fhe past year would have justified 
our course. Through-out the whoile rtt 
190ft, however, there has been no mo- 
ment r i national doubt, and nature 
seems to have furthered almost every 

effort we have made. This has clearly 
pi oil need an optimism wlncli is Iraught 

with great danger, and it is to be hoped 
that everywhere in Canada the many 
who did not hesitate to incur debt be- 
cause they believed in the future, will, 
now that partial fruition of their hopes 
has come, hasten to get out of debt be- 
fore they consider what new expenditure 
the still further removed future will 
justify. In saying this I need not apolo- 
gize for repeating what has already been 
said elsewhere; indeed, it can hardly be 
said too often. 

It may be wall before dealing with 
details, to consider the main facts 
which seem to influence our immediate 
future. S« far as our interests are in 
c-i munoii with those of the rest of the 
world, the end of the Russo-Japanese 
war seems the most important event of 
the year. The cost of money in the 
markets of Europe, owing to recent 
wars, has been abnormally (high for 
many [years. If, after the final loans 
en used by this last war are placed, we 
are to 'have a long period of peace, then 
the value of money in Europe should 
gradually decline, and this would have a 
most favorable effect not only in the 
ease with which money could be got for 
Canadian enterprises, but in the cost of 
the fixed charges upon th© enterprises 
arising from such borrowings. Of course 
Che present terribly disordered state of 
Russia must pass away before (Paris and 
other continental money markets are re- 
stored ^o a normal condition. But in 
any event, unless Clhina intends to resent 
her bad treatment by the western na- 
tions, it seems aa if m may reasonably 



expect peace and great industrial de- 
velopment in thait part of Asia which 
looks across the ocean to our own Prov- 
inces and to those States in the Ameri- 
can Union which (have their shores on 
the Pacific Ocean. If so, we aire., rea- 
sonably certain that this bank will share 
largely in the trade which mmsit come 
to both Canada and the United States. 
While the purchasing power of each in- 
dividual of these Japanese and Chinese 
peoples may be very small — and that 
part of it which represents what is- called 
foreign trade is certainly very trifling — 
still the aggregate, owing to the vast 
population, will be very large as soon 
as they are well enough off to buy sueh 
staples as wheat, flour, timber, railroad 
supplies, etc., in any proportion to their 
desire to obtain these commodities. 

■Another great factor in the gradual 
restoration of the money markets to a 
normal! condition is the rapidly increas- 
ing new gold supply. The addition in 
each year to the world's store of prec- 
ious metals of about $350,000,000 worth 
of gold and about $100,000,000 worth, at 
present market prices, of silver, is large 
enough not only to steady the money 
markets in the course of time, but also 
to give great impetus' to the efforts being 
made in some countries to escape from 
a mere paper basis, and in others which 
are on a silver basis, to advance to a 
gold basis. We have entirely recovered 
from the decline in the volume of pro- 
duction caused by the South African 
war; indeed the output of $350,000,000 
for 1904 means an increase in the an- 
nual production of $150,000,000 in nine 
years, Sq that we maj soon be able to 
say that the world has doubled its an- 
nual new supply of gold in twelve or 
fifteen years. 

Other important facts, but of more 
local and direct concern bo Canada, are 
our good crops, the enlarged scale of 
our railroad building, the satisfactory 
inflow of immigration, the development 
of steel and iron making, and the tre- 
mendously enhanced interest shown re- 
garding Canada in both Great Britain 
and the United States, .particularly ex- 
emplified by acute discussions of tariff 
preference and reciprocity. 

It is hardly necessary to enter as 
fully into the details of our foreign trade 
as we did a year ago. The fiscal year 
covered by the Dominion Government re- 
ports ended 30th June, 1905, and the ef- 
fect of the harvest of 1905 on our ex- 
• port3 is therefore not yet evident. W« 
again show a serious loss In exports, 
the total falling to $203,3-18,000, about 

32 



$10,000,000 less than In 1904, and $22.- 
500,000 less than the high-water mark 
of 1903. The loss is practically all in 
agricultural products, other increases 
and decreases about offsetting each 
other. Doubtless in the first half of the 
present fiscal year the loss will have 
been made up. The more serious aspect 
of our foreign trade is on the import 
side. We had $10,000,000 less to pay 
with by way of exchanging commodities, 
and yet we bought $7,500,000 more than 
for the previous year, widening the un- 
favorable balance between exports and 
imports to $63,500,000. From 1895 to 
190*1 inclusive, but deducting the small 
contra balance of 1899, the excess of ex- 
ports over imports was $51,000,000. This 
has been followed by an excess of im- 
ports over exports from 1902 to 1905 
inclusive, but practically for only three 
yeairs, of $125,000,000. As we said a year 
ago, we are spending money in public 
and private improvements, looking to 
the future for a return, but do not let 
us overlook the fact that we are putting 
a heavy mortgage on the future. It is 
well to notice that .we imported a little 
less from Great Britain in the year 
under, review than in the previous year, 
while our imports from the United States 
were nearly $11,000,000 greater. Of our 
imports iron and steel in all forms, in- 
cluding rails, account for nearly $40,- 
000,000. This gives a concrete illustra- 
tion of what it would be worth to Can- 
ada to make these articles entirely, or 
as nearly as possible, in our own country. 
The Clearing House returns help us to 
understand the growth of the internal 
trade of Canada. In 1904 the total of 
the operafaons of eleven clearing houses 
was $2,735,744,235. For 1905 the total is 
$3,336,602,170. 

THE MARITIME PROVINCES. 

In view of the rather unhappy condi- 
tions we had to report last year re- 
garding the Maritime Provinces, it is 
pleasant to have to deal with a much 
improved state of affairs this year. The 
Provinces experienced another unusually 
severe winter, and this had a somewhat 
adverse effect on business. For in- 
stance it increased the cost and lessened 
the cut of lumber. The cut, it will be 
remembered, was being in any event in- 
tionally reduced because of a sharp fall 
in the price of deals. The usual result 
of this curtailment of product has hap- 
pily been obtained, and returns for all 
lumber products are again hig>» while 
the price* offered for uue next sea»sn'a 
cut of spruce deals are almost a record, 
and tha demand for freight space at St. 



January 20, 1906 



BANK OF COMMERCE REPORT 



Hardware and Metal 



John, N.B., has very greatly incveaser 1 
rates. ; For fish, prices <have been p*k 
whidh have not boon readied before, and 
esults in some kinds of fishing are quite 
satisfactory. There are, however, de- 
tails in this important industry which 
are worth our attention. While the bank 
and the bay fishing have been equal to 
the average of the last three seasons, 
with better prices, the shore fishing, ex- 
cept in lobsters, is nearly ruined by the 
so-called dog-fish, the predatory Incur- 
sions of which have almost ruined for 
the lime being the valuable mackerel 
and herring fisheries. The loss incur- 
red in money is very large indeed, and it 
is certainly to be hoped that the experi- 
ments of the Government, looking to the 
material decrease of the numbers of dog- 
fish, may be successful. 

The enforcement of the Newfoundland 
Bait Act, fes it applies to United States 
fishing vessels, is helping the fishermen 
of the Maritime Provinces as well as oi 
Newfoundland, and the importance of 
the matter to us makes it an additional 
cause for regret that Newfoundland is 
not in the Confederation. Is it not 
time for Canada to reconsider the modus 
vivendi arrived at after the rejection by 
the United States Senate, in 1888, of 
the Chamberlain-Bayard Treaty? Why 
should we give United States fishing ves- 
sels the very privileges which enable 
them to undersell us in their markets? 
We realize that this is a matter which 
must be viewed broadly if any breadth 
of view is shown by our neighbors, but 
we have as yet seen little evidence of 
that. Canada and Newfoundland to- 
gether own magnificent fishing areas, 
large enough to influence greatly the 
fish markets of the world. As the vari- 
ous countries of the world increase in 
wealth and purchasing power, the de- 
mand for fish, cured in one form or an- 
other, must steadily increase. The 
prosperity of our Atlantic and Pacific 
Provinces depends virtually on the per- 
manence and increased volume of our 
fisheries- Why should we hesitate to 
take every step necessary to protect and 
develop such a national asset? i Indeed 
it is most pleasant to see that the De- 
partment of Marine and Fisheries, under 
the late Minister, has been exhibiting 
considerable energy in this direction. 

The yield of apples was only about 
60 per cent, of a normal crop, but prices 
are high. In hay, from the lack of 
which last year great loss arose, there 
was at least a normal, and. in some 
parts, a very large crop. Produce of 
almiost all kinds has brought good prices 
and while there are a few localities 
wihere progress has not been made, the 
general results are excellent. The comple- 
tion of the Halifax & South-Western 
Railway should do much for some parts 
of Nova Scotia. We are able once more 
to report that the various branches of 
manufacturing in these Provinces have 
been, as a rule, very profitable, and that 
in many cares the yearly output has 
again been the largest known. In some 
very important industries the orders in 
hand are particularly large, and the 
quantity of coal mined has somewhat in- 
creased. Perhaps the most gratifying 
and important industrial fact is the fur- 
ther improvement in the conditions sur- 
rounding the manufacture of iron and 
steel, and particularly the beginning of 
the manufacture of rails, the excellent 
quality of which seems to have been 
demonstrated at once. 



ONTARIO. 
To the people of Ontario, as a whole, 
the year has been one of very general 
prosperity. The industries of the Pro- 
vince, whether on the farm or in the 
town, the geographical situation, and 
the conditions of soil and climate, are 
all so varied that we can hardly have 
years in which there are no localities 
which differ in prosperity from the gen- 
eral average. What is clear, however, 
is that, while we have not had a year 
so good for the farmers as 1903, we 
have had a very much better year than 
1904. Crops of wheat, oats, barley and 
other grains have varied more than us- 
ual in yield in different parts of the 
Province, and in some grains prices 
have not been as good as last year, but 
the total result is satisfactory. These 
crops, except to the extent that they 
affect the value of cattle fed for the 
market, are no longer of prime import- 
ance. The crop of hay has been heavy 
in some parts, not so in others, but a 
good crop as a whole, while pasturage 
has been abundant almost everywhere. 
Roots, as a whole, have been unsatis- 
factory, but this does not apply to sugar 
beets, which are being grown more ex- 
tensively each year in several parts of 
Ontario. Fruit crops have been variable, 
but shipments of apples from Montreal 
are larger than in any year except 1903. 
The total for 1905 from that port is 
539.000 barrels, against 348,000 for 1904, 
and 732,000 for 1903. When we turn 
to the great farming interest, that of 
the dairy, the figures become very in- 
teresting. .Taking, as we should, the 
results from cheese and butter together, 
the figures for the past year are almost 
the largest in the history of shipments 
from Montreal. The quantity of cheese 
shipped is about 10 per cent, less than 
in 1903, and not appreciably more than 
in 1897, 1902 and 1904, but the average 
price is so high that 1905 remains the 
largest in money value except 1903, when 
both quantity and average price were 
the largest ever known. It is in the more 
lately established export of butter that 
pronounced gain has been made. The 
total shipments were 573,449 packages, 
valued at $7,400,000. The price is bet- 
ter than last year, but not as good as 
for several years previous to 1904. The 
only year which surpasses 1905 in re- 
sults is 1902, when a somewhat smaller 
quantity brought a larger sum of money 
owing to a much higher price. Taking 
the two articles together, the totals for 
the last four years, three of which ex- 
ceed all other years, are as follows : 

1905 $25,426,000 ' 

1904 20,704,000 

1903 . *.*. 26,366.000 

1902 25,863,000 

The other great farming interest of 
Ontario, that of live stock, is less satis- 
factory, taken as a whole, than is de- 
sirable. Shipments of cattle have been 
larger than for any year except 1903, 
when they exceeded the shipments of 
1905 by 25 per cent. The business, 
however, has been unprofitable to both 
grazier and shipper. The grazier paid 
too much for the cattle he put on grass, 
and at present prices feels forced, in 
many cas.es, to feed them over the win- 
ter in the hope of better prices next 
sprin?. The home and United * States 
aaai-keW tor sheep have been ^ood, and 

33 



the prices paid in Canada for hogs par- 
ticularly so. Horses also have been in 
good demand. The general result of all 
farming industry in Ontario is shown 
by larger purchases, and by payments 
on mortgages, implement notes, ^ and 
other debts, indicating a most healthy 
and prosperous condition. In the lumber 
trade in Ontario there has been a reduc- 
tion in the cut, as in New Brunswick, 
but prices for pine and hemlock ar« 
about at the highest, and the year 
has been a prosperous one. While there 
may, in the coming season, be a still fur- 
ther advance in the cost of production, 
prices are so high as to ensure a good 
profit, and unless there is a scarcity of 
water in the streams we shall probably 
have an increased quantity manufac- 
tured. 

Interest in mining has been stimulated 
by the publicity given to the discovery 
in northern Ontario of rich deposits of 
silver-nickel-cobalt ores. Ko far as is 
yet known, the area in which these ores 
exist Is very limited, all the discovering 
of any real value being within about 
four miles of the new town of Cobalt, 
wihere we have recently estaDiisned a 
branch. At present nothing definite can 
be said as to the extent of the deposits 
or the probable life of the cams/ ^Com- 
paratively little development ha? taken 
place, and to what depth thp veins of 
ore may run is uncertain, although a 
diamond drill has traced one 
rich vein to a depth of over 
300 feet. But it may safely be 
said that from the veins already dis- 
covered several million dollars' worth of 
ore will be taken, while there is hardly 
any question but that within the small 
area which is known to contain the ores 
further discoveries will yet be made. A 
large proportion of the ore produced 
is of a very refractory nature, and dif- 
ficulty is being experienced in disposing 
of it at prices which will give returns 
for all the valuable constituents. It is 
to be hoped that before long a satis- 
factory method of treatment will be 
made available, and that it will be 
found practicable to treat the ores with- 
in the Province of Ontario. 

It is probable that during the coming 
summer there will be a considerable in- 
flux of population into the district sur- 
rounding Cobalt, and signs are not want- 
ing that an attempt will be made to 
create not only a mining but a mining 
stock boom. Serious losses to the public 
have in the past resulted (from attempts 
to capitalize mere prospects at prices 
wOiiV ymly producing mines should 
command, and it is to be hoped that 
no encouragement will now be given to 
any movement of the kind. 

In the manufacturing centres, large 
and small, there is, with scarcely an ex- 
ception, but one experience, that of con- 
tinued growth. Factories are still being 
enlarged, manufacturers in the United 
States are still opening branch manu- 
facturing establishments in Canada, and 
in important businesses, which have an 
unbroken record of increased sales for 
several years, further increases of 20 
and 25 per cent, are still not uncom- 
mon. fThis growth again is causing, in 
cities and towns, an unusual activity in 
building and a great increase in the sale- 
able values of real estate. "Such ques- 
tions as the building of workingmen'» 
dwellings are becoming acute, and it is 
evidunl^Uiat the lartfgr majiuiactujere 



Hardware and Metal 



BANK OF COMMERCE REPORT 



January 20, 1906 



maj nave to do what ha» already been 
lone occasionally In Canada — build 
houses For their men. Manufacturers, 

contractors, and even the class of smaller 
builders, arc. as a rote, behind in deliver- 
ies of ?oods or in work being executed. 
One of the specialty noticeable features is 
the resumption, on a more stable basis, 
manufacture of steel j rails at 
Saort Ste. Marie. Wihile we are 
ing particularly of Ontario, many of 
these remarks appl|\' to Canada as a 
whole, and of nourse much of this activ- 
ity i-s the result of the great growth of 
the West. Unfortunately, we cannot 
have prosperity, apparently, without a 
general increase in the cost of every- 
thing, and in this connection the cost of 
building and the consequent cost of house 
rent should be a matter of great con- 
cern. When hard tunes come, as come 
they must, there will be a sharp adjust 
ine.nt in some direction, because clearly 
the wage-earner will not be able to con- 
tinue to pay such rents as are being paid 
now by the workingmen in out larger 
cities, both in the east and in the west. 

The Province of Quebec has shared 
fully in the general prosperity of Canada 
and the only reason for not enlarging 
upon this fact is the absence of branches 
of this bank, apart from that in Mont- 
real, and therefore of natural sources oft 
information regarding industrial mat- 
ter*. 

In Ontario and Quebec railroad build- 
ing is proceeding at a pace which 
marks a new era in transportation in 
this part of Canada. The Canadian ship- 
ping on the lakes is increasing in vol- 
ume most satisfactorily, while at Mont- 
real there were increases in the number 
of ocean arrivals and departures, in 
freight and passenger traffic, in the rev- 
enue of the port, and in local canal traf- 
fic. Shipbuilding in Canada is now very 
active, terminal facilities at Montreal 
and Quebec are being gradually improv- 
ed, and in almost every direction pro- 
gress i-> evident. ' 

We have had, however, on the St. 
Lawrence route another season of heavy 
losses. Thi- must be a matter of very 
great disappointment to most Canadians 
who have been indulging the hope that 
the condition of navigation on the St. 
I^awrenee would, before long, be sutfi- 
ciently improved to warrant '/a belief 
that it is in every way a satisfactory 
highway. We need not hesitate to say 
that this is one of the most important 
points in connection with the develop- 
ment of Canadian transportation. There 
i-, little use in spending money and 
energy in the development of the rail- 
DM of this part of Canada 
- we can be sure that the com- 
munication by sea is as perfect as it is 
humanly possible to make it. We be- 
lieve great improvements are being made 
and are in contemplation, in the way of 
lighting, and. if there are obstructions 
to navigation which can be removed, we 
presume that thi~ will be done, but in- 
ii) to '-how that many of 
the accidents are due solely to the earo- 
38 or incompetency of the pilots. 
This is a grave Charge, and if true no 
time should be wasted in dealing with it. 
rs well as with any other defects which 
ipabie of remedy. We /eel sure 
that the people of Canada will sustain 
the Government in practically any ex- 
penditure that is necessary in this con 
nection. 



NORTHWEST PROVINCES. 

At the moment, Canada, to many peo- 
ple in the United States and Europe, 
means our three Northwest Provinces, 
and we who live in the east may as well 
become used to the fact. Having re- 
gard to present population, few places 
are more talked about than Winnipeg. 
We waited long to come into possession 
of this country, guarded as it was so 
carefully from the settler, and in the 
short time during which we have con- 
trolled its destiny we have struggled 
hard with the two great problems of set- 
tlement — transportation and immigra- 
tion. It now looks as if we are to have 
our reward. Many claims have been 
made for this part of Canada which fail 
to take into account the laborious part 
which man must play in its development 
and the probability that, being inherent- 
ly lazy, he will not quite do his best. 
On the other hand, there have been "writ- 
ers about the Northwest whose pessi- 
mistic views are obviously the result of 
holding a brief which calls for the coun- 
sel of despair instead of hope. The 
plain statement of the truth, however, as 
far as it has been ascertained, is all that 
the country needs. It is clearly a part 
of the world where many millions of peo- 
ple may work out their material inde- 
pendence; may. in proportion to their 
industry and intelligence, become owners 
of ^property; and where a larger pro- 
portion than is often the case in the 
world may become actually wealthy. 

When in August many were estimat- 
ing the wheat crop at 00,000.000 to 100,- 
000.000 bushels, we =nnt to London the 
estimate of our Winnipeg manager, 
which was 82,540.000 bushels. For all 
grains together his estimate was 174,- 
125,000 bushels. The crop has now been 
harvested and largely marketed, and the 
revised report of the Northwest Grain 
Dealers' Association at October 15th. 
was as follows: — 

Acres. Bush. per acre. Ttl. bush 
Wheat ...4,019,000 21.6 86,810,400 

Oats .. ..1,423.000 46.6 66,311,800 

Barley .. 433,800 31.0 13,447,800 

Flax .... 34,900 13.7 478,130 

A total of 167,048.130 bushels. 

The conditions under which the crop 
was sown, ripened and harvested were 
all more favorable than we have the 
right to expect every year, and a marked 
contrast to those of the previous year. 
Perhaps the most satisfactory feature 
of the wheat crop is the proportion, 
said to be as high as 80 to 85 per cent-, 
which is classified as high-grade milling 
wheat. . And it is to be remembered 
that our wheat, when compared with 
the wheat similarly graded in the United 
States, is really so superior to the latter 
as to put our farmers to some disadvan- 
tage in obtaining what their wheat is 
really worth. i 

The money value, although seriously 
affected bv the fall in the price of wheat, 
must, nevertheless, be from $70,000,000 
to $75,000,000, and to this must be added 
that of the oattle, bogs, horses, dairy 
produce, etc. This is not a large sum 
of money compared with agricultural 
figures in older parts of the world, but 
it is a very large sum, of money for a 
country so young in everything which 
contributes to industrial success. Sta- 
tistics regarding new countries have 
much ^greater significance as indications 
of the possibilities of the future than as 
illustrations of the present, and those 
we submit, regarded in connection with 
the very small proportion of the avail- 
able area wliiiih Uas jet begju itlieU. arc 

34 



enough to dispose of doubt as to out 
ability at some time in the not distant 
future to supply Croat Britain with her 
requirements in cereals. 

When nature is willing to do so much 
for us it is depressing to consider how 
badly man often does his part. ) There 
is unfortunately no longer any room for 
doubt that many of the more early set- 
tled of the Manitoba farms are decreas- 
ing in productive power because the land 
has been allowed to deteriorate, barm- 
era who are careless year after year in 
the selection of seed, wbo neglect to de- 
stroy noxious weeds, who wild not con- 
sider their land in changing crops from 
yea.r to year, or protect their crops when 
being 1 harvested, are simply enemies to 
the public good, and should, as far as 
the law permits, be treated as such. If 
the municipal authorities would carry 
out the law, both as to farmers who al- 
low noxious weeds to grow on their 
farms, and as to their own road allow- 
ances, a change would at once result so 
great as to show how criminally reckless 
is the neglect of such a course. We are 
glad to hear that the Canadian Pacific 
and the Canadian Northern Railways, 
working in conjunction with the officers 
of the Experimental Farms, are sending 
over their lines special oars filled with 
samples of grain and of noxious weeds, 
and in charge of lecturers who will il- 
lustrate the advantage of good seed, the 
best methods of cultivating grain and of 
exterminating weeds, and the effect and 
the loss in money Ironi diseases of wheat. 
By far the most interesting fact in grain- 
growing in the Northwest at present is 
what might be called the discovery that 
we have great winter wheat areas where 
until lately we had not even considered 
that winter wheat could be grown. In 
190.3 we raised less than 30,000 bushels 
of winter wheat, while last year the 
quantity in Alberta is estimated at over 
1,500,000 bushels. The highest authori- 
ties in the United States are most en- 
thusiastic as to its quality, and as to the 
value of land which produces such an 
article of commerce, while in competition 
with winter wheat from all parts of the 
United States the best of our varieties 
carried off the gold medal at the Lewis 
and Clark Exhibition, recently held in 
Portland, Oregon. To add to the im- 
portance of the discovery, this wheat 
has. thus far in Alberta, been most 
largely grown in localities which were 
not by eastern people included in the 
wheat, but rather in the cattle, coun- 
trg\ Winter wheat has also been grown 
successfully in other localities, notably 
in the Swan River Valley in northern 
Manitoba, where, for four years, experi- 
ments have demonstrated its success. 
These two districts are so remote and so 
different geographically that it is hardly 
safe to venture a guess as to what we 
may not hope to accomplish in this verjyi 
important development. > 

There has been a large increase in the 
shipments of cattle to the east, and as 
a whole prices were better than last 
year. While conditions for the profitable 
grazing of cattle by farmers are not as 
favorable as we could wish, there will 
doubtless be a steady increase in live 
stock shipments, and in time this will be 
a most valuable feature in farming 
throughout the three Provinces. Thero 
is a noticeable improvement in the 
character of the breeding of cattle and 
horses in several localities., but ho^s_aic 



January 20, 1906 



BANK OF COMMERCE REPORT 



Hardware and Metal 



not increasing 1 satisfactorily in number: 
nor are daim/ring and the smaller ad- 
juncts of good farming, such as poultry- 
raising, .obtaining sufficient attention. 
Our Northwestern farmers should not 
delay too long developing along lines 
which have been successful in such States 
as Iowa, Minnesota and others, especial- 
ly in view of the deterioration of uhe 
land to which we have .referred. 

In the ranching districts the condi- 
tions under which cattle wore fattened 
have varied, being excellent in most 
parte and in others while not bad. -till 
not quite satisfactory. Siales'have been 
larger than lost year, prices better, and 
the industrlv has prospered. The sale of 
one of the largest and best-known 
ranches in Alberta, however, to> the auth- 
orities of the Mormon Church, at a 
price which means the re-saile of the 
ranch for farming purposes, is only one 
of many indications that the future of 
the large ranch is at least uncertain. 
There are undoubtedly large areas much 
more suitable for ranching than for any- 
thing else, while other parts of Southern 
Alberta are destined to be converted into 
successful! farms, growing among other 
things the best of winter wheat. And 
in this connection we must not forget 
the important enterprise of sugar-mak- 
ing in Alberta, based entirely on beet 
crops, grown in that Province. 

One wonders how many eastern Can- 
adians realize that theTe are already in 
Manitoba alone over 3,000 miles of rail- 
way. ,,When we consider what railways 
have done for Manitoba, we may hn- 
agme the intense interest in the new 
Provinces in the building of the Grand 
Trunk Pacific Railway, Which will open 
up another great stretch of fertile lands; 
In the entry of the Canadian Northern 
Railway into Edmonton; and in the 
proposal of the Canadian Pacific Kail- 
way to build from the southeast to the 
same point. These new Provinces, tran- 
sected by main lines of transcontinental 
railways, will need rapidly maniy miles 
of branch lines, and we may expect great 
development of this kind 

Saskatchewan and Alberta are each so 
much larger than Maniu»u.i, aim the 

new seniors are to so much greater an 
extent going into these new Provinces, 
that it will try our ability to the ut- 
most to keep pace in railways and all 
other aids to material progress. These 
new Provinces are not only possessed of 
great possibilities as producers of grain 
and cattle, they also contain in large 
quantities. coaJ, lumber, oil and other 
natural resources. The fur trade of 
last year for that part of the Territories 
north of the new Provinces which is 
tributary to Edmonton, is estimated in 
value at over a million dollars 

Immigration is now very large, the 
numbers coming from the United States 
being still much greater than those from 
Europe, while the movement of Can- 
adians from the-east to the west of Lake 
Superior is almost half as great as the 
immigration from the United states. 
The land sales are so large that the 
railway, land and colonization com pan- 
Sea have materially advanced their 
prices. In this connection we again 
draw attention to the wide range of land 
speculation throughout the west. ">That 
men should invest or speculate in land 
Where land is almost the one great as- 
set is inevitable; that farmers should 
buy *and try to hold more land than 
the,y can ea.siky cultivate, although thej 



iwe dependent upon an uncertain labor 
market, is quite natural under the cir- 
cumstances; but when an entire com- 
munity — merchants, manufacturer*, 
farmers, professional men and clerks — is 
engaged in the effort to increase ,the 
price of land, trouble must come sooner 
or later,. There are, of course, many 
things transpiring which will legitimate- 
ly advance the market value of land 
in town and country, but these influ- 
ences are at the moment probably iess 
powerfull than the mere views of a com- 
munity bent on holding for a rise land 
for which many have no personal use 
Some daoi or other an uncomfortably 
large number will wish to sell at the 
same time, and grievous loss will doubt- 
less result. 

Public improvements by municipalities 
and the erection of buildings of ail kinds 
throughout the three Provinces have 
been proceeding at a remarkable pace. 
The increase in building during 1904 in 
Winnipeg seemed to make it improbable 
that there would be a much further in- 
crease in 1905. The buildings erected, 
however, in 1905, are almost twice as 
many as in the previous year, although 
the aggregate cost is not very much 
in excess. The supply of houses in 
Winnipeg seems now about equal to the 
demand, and it is to bo hoped that this 
will cause some check to building of a 
speculative character. 

The payment of debts is of course ma- 
terially better than in 1904- Tt is abun- 
dantly evident, however, that people 
throughout the West have incurred 
heavy debts for the holding of farm and 
city property, and but for this and the 
unsatisfactory crop of 1904 the financial 
effect of the present crop would have 
been much more satisfactory. We are 
glad to notice that throughout the West 
there is a determination on the part of 
those extending credit to be much more 
rigid and careful in future. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

While the Northwestern Provinces 
have had more attention from Eastern 
Canada and from the outside world dur- 
ing the past year, no Province in Can- 
ada has had greater prosperity relative- 
ly to its immediate possibilities than 
British Columbia. This huge Province, 
destined probably some day to outstrip 
all others in wealth, with resources 
which require literally millions of peo- 
ple for their development, has at present 
but a handful, as it were, of people. It 
is so rich in products of both sea and 
river, valley, and mountain,— fish, fruit, 
Brain, cattle, timber, coal, and almost 
all minerals; it is so lovely a country 
for man to live in: and it, can eventually 
be so largely self-supporting because of 
its possibilities in producing varieties of 
food and varieties of manufactures. 
that no one can doubt as to the char- 
acter of its industrial future. But the 
physical and financial problem of British 
Columbia is by far the most difficult of 
any of the Provinces, and it seems desir- 
able that the other people of Canada 
should appreciate what the British Co- 
lumbiana have to do. Individually the 
people of this Province are well off. and 
the growth of the city of Vancouver is 
as startling as that of Winnipeg. Cal- 
gary or Fdmonton. but the number of 
people in British Columbia is about the 
same as in the city of Toronto, and a 
large part is not of white blood. This 
small body is called upon to make tli«* 
initial expenditures nece?->ai\ to lender 

35 



even the earliest conditions of settlement 
possible- And those initial expenditures 
moan roads built in one of (he most dif- 
ficult of countries, bridges across great 
rivers, etc: indeed, at every point, the 
first outlay is most costly, especially aa 
compared with that of the prairie Prov- 
inces. And when communication is 
made the individual again has to ex- 
pend unusual labor and money before he 
can get any return. The ultimate re- 
sult of such initial expenditure, if wisely 
made, is not a matter of doubt, but the 
difficulties explain why British Columbia 
gTOWS more slowly in population than 
wo all wish 

The lumber business, depending as it 
still does mainly upon the prairie Prov- 
inces, has boon very satisfactory, as to 
both volume and price. In coal mining 
there has boon a handsome increase in 
production of both coal anil coke, and 
several now mines are being opened. 
There seoms to be no reason why these 
two staple industries should not grow 
steadily, especially in view of the almost 
unlimited raw material, until British Co- 
lumbia takes its place anions the great 
coal and lumber producers of the world. 
Tn anticipation of this several large sales 
of timber limits have recently taken 
place at good prices, and among tho 
buyers are a good many Americans. 
Copper mining and smelting are now 
established and profitable industries. 
They require large capital and complete 
technical knowledge, but the results of 
such a combination seem to bo as ship 
as in other well-managed manufacturing 
businesses. The year's output of the 
Boundary mining district is about 1,000- 
000 tons. There is a marked improve- 
ment in lead and silver mininz and the 
outlook seems better than for many 
years. J 

The cattle ranching business has been 
fairly good; important movements look- 
ing to the growing of fruit on a Iarae 
scaile are boiii? made; irrigation in some 
dry districts is being successfully car- 
ried on; farming and dairying in the 
districts where pursued have been prof- 
itable, and. generally, all land operations 
have yielded a good return for labor be 
stowed tiiereon. Increase in the value 
of real estate and activity in building 
have been as marked as in other parts 
of Canada, and in Vancouver especially 
speculation in real estate has reached 
proportions which promise trouble ?or 
some of the investors. 

This bein<r the year for the curious 

quadrennial recurrence of large returns 

from the Prasw liner, salmon fishing in 

British Columbia has been successful, and 

the fish have fortunately brought a hisrh 
nm.rK.ec. price, ime previous tnree year* 

have been so unsatisfactory that vigor- 
ous steps for the preservation of this 
great industry have become 'plainly 
necessary, and we are glad to know that 
as one of the results from a Commis- 
sion appointed by the Dominion liov- 
eminent we are likely to have much 
more attention paid hereafter to the fish- 
ing interests oif the Pacific than has 
hitherto been the case. We cannot ex- 
pect that the next three yen- will pro- 
duce satisfactory results, but u arrange- 
ments now in contemplation can be 
completed, the result should be a steady 
prosecution of efforts at increasing the 
number of salmon, and, if those are 
Successful, we may in the course ot time 
build up the three lean years of the 
Eraser River to the level of the fourth 
year, and we may adso improve all other 
Jiriliih Columbia s.iluiuii livers, ihe 



Hardware and Metal 



BANK OF COMMERCE REPORT 



January 20, 1906 



object is so vitally important to Brit- 
ish uoiuinJDia that we can only Hope 
that politics will not be alllowed in any 
manner whatever to interfere with the 
desired Result. Salmon fishing is, how- 
ever, only a small part of the great fish- 
ing rights possessed by Oanada in the 
Pacific Ocean and the livers running 
thereto. The supplies of halibut and 
herring are almost inexhaustible, and 
there are large quantities of other fish, 
ruch as smelte, cod, whiting, etc., but at 
present the business of fishing is not 
well organized, nor is there sufficient 
BkiM in the community to make the 
best use of this great natural source of 
wealth. It is doubtful if in eastern 
Oanada and in foreign countries any 
conception has been formed of the ex- 
tent and richness of the fishing grounds 
owned by British Columbia. At the 
present time the United States fisher- 
men axe taking large quantities of hali- 
but, using our ports for refuge in case 
of storm, fwid shipping their halibut 
from Vancouver in bond to the United 
States. We cannot, of course, interfere 
with any legal rights they have, but 
eureloi, as in the case of the Atlantic 
fisheries, we ought not positively to aid 
such a diversion of our natural products. 
In this connection we should also like 
to draw attention to the unfortunate 
effect of the exclusion of Mongolian 
labor. It was of most noticeable value 
in connection with both fishing and can- 
ning, and the lack of such labor must 
have a very deterrent effect upon pro- 
gress in this particular industry. 

There has been considerable railroad 
building in southern British Columbia, 
and sooner or later large developments 
must follow the building of the Grand 
Trunk Pacific Railway across the upper 
part of the Province. The sale of the 
Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway to the 
Canadian (Pacific Railway should also 
have an important effect upon the de- 
velopment of Vancouver Island. 

UNITED STATES. 

In common with most other portions 
of North America, the Pacific coast 
States of Washington, Oregon and Cali- 
fornia, in all of Which we have branches, 
have enjoyed unusual prosperity during 
the past year, exceeding in many re- 
spects any record in the past. 

The wheat crop in Washington has 
been the largest in its history; the sal- 
mon season has been very satisfactory 
and profitable, both in volume and in 
price; the lumber business has improved 
over that of the previous year; the crop 
of hops is larger than usual, but the 
great fall in price has made the business 
unprofitable; the trade with Alaska and 
tha north has been better than for -sev- 
eral years; the end of the Eastern war 
has been followed by a frreat increase 
in the trans-Pacific trade; preparations 
are evidently being made for the en- 
trance into Seattle of new transcon- 
tinental roads: and generally the year 
has been one of the most prosperous in 
the history of Washington. It would 
not be wise for any one to venture upon 
an estimate of the probable effect on 
Washington of the development of Al- 
aska -which is so rapidly going on; 
of the trans-Pacific trade now only in its 
infancy; and of the development of 
its own vast resources in timber, and 
in lands suitable for wheat culture. 
Whil" the 2V>ld which has reached Seat- 
tle from the 1 ukon ahowg a total of 



only $7,861,000. the results from Nome, 
Tanana and other sources bring the 
total up to $18,667,000. and it seems 
olear that, while there must be de- 
oreases in various camps, the total is not 
likallyi to decrease for some time to come, 
especially as so little territory has as yet 
been worked by dredges or hydraulics. 

We find a similar prosperity in Ore- 
gon. ,The product in lumiber. was about 
the «arne as last year, with better prices. 
The State is said to have in standing 
timber two hundred and thirty-five bib 
lion feet, occupying ahout 54,000 square 
miles. This must be one of the world's 
greatest timber reserves. The yield of 
wheat has increased, with a better out- 
look for the next crop than for many 
years past, and flour exports are larger. 
The results from fishing were excellent, 
indeed as good as in 1904. Other in- 
dustries, such as dairying and wool, 
have done well, while hops, fruit, etc., 
have had varying success. The total re- 
sults of all industry have given Oregon 
a signal year of progress. 

California has had some features of an 
unfavorable kind, but still the year is 
regarded as the best in the history of 
the State. The wheat crop was very 
unsatisfactory, the yield being but about 
12.000.000 bushels, against 32.000.000 in 
1899. The character of farming in the 
State is apparently bad, and the decline 
can be only partially attributed to an 
unfavorable season. The receipts of 
salmon from Alaska were the largest 
since 1901. The manufacture of redwood 
lumber has increased and the total for 
1905 is about 340.000,000 feet, as against 
209,000.000 in 1900, each intervening yeaT 
showing a moderate but steady growth. 
The receipts of lumber of all kinds at 
San Francisco for 1905 were 759,000.000 
feet, ''a handsome increase over 1904. 
The value of the crops of oranges and 
lemons is about $40,000,000, as compared 
with $30,000,000 in 1904. The crop of 
grapes for wine, table and raisins was 
about three-quarters of an average, but 
the quality was the best yet known. 
The trade in canned and green fruits was 
very large and profitable, stimulated par- 
ticularly by the poor fruit crops of the 
Eastern and Middle States. California 
is steadily increasing in wealth and pop- 
ulation, railroad building is proceeding 
rapidly, shipping is again profitable, while 
veal estate and building both here and in 
Oregon and Washington are exhibiting 
the same activity as elsewhere in the 
United States and Canada. 

Considering the United States gener- 
ally, the conditions are distinctly pros- 
perous. With another great corn crop, 
this year exceeding two and a half bil- 
lion bushels, with a wheat crop of about 
700,000,000 bushels — only once exceeded 
before, and about 150,000,000 bush- 
els larger than in 1904 — with 
other grain crops slightly larger, 
and with a cotton crop of 
about normal proportions, the basis 
of a great commerce is established. The 
exports exceeded a billion and a half 
of dollars, while the imports for the 
second time exceeded a billion dollars, 
these figures leaving an enormous bal- 
ance of trade in favor of the AJnited 
States. Their internal trade has been 
on a greater scale than ever. There is 
evidence of this in every kind of busi- 
ness activity, but in nothing more clear- 
ly than the usual test of expanding 
trade— that of iron and steel. "Almost 
every blast furnace is in operation,, yie 



36 



volume of ore being transported from 
the mines, and consequently of pig iron 
manufactured, exceeding all previous 
experience. This enormous volume of 
legitimate and profitable trade is un- 
fortunately, but perhaps naturally, ac- 
companied by excessive speculation in 
securities, with prices which certainly 
seem perilously high. The country's re- 
quirements for bank loans are very 
large indeed, and the rates paid for 
money in New York recently, although 
only from day to day and for speculative 
purposes, . are a sufficient indication of 
an overstrained condition. One cannot 
view without ooncern such an abnormal 
state of affairs, and .it is to be hoped 
that the real business interests of the 
country will not suffer because of the 
volume and the pace of stock specula- 
tion. 

Before sitting down I would like to 
remind gentlemen who are here — and I 
have said the same thing before — that 
this report, which is filled with many 
dry facts, and altogether too many fig- 
ures, is really not prepared so much for 
those who are good enough to be pre- 
sent and listen to it, as for the 8,500 
shareholders and for the customers of 
the bank in the various Provinces, and 
in the various States to which I have 
referred. I make this statement be- 
cause it may seem curious to you that 
we should be interested in many facts 
which seem quite local. They are local 
so far as people in Toronto are concern- 
ed but they are deeply interesting to 
people in the various sections with which 
I have dealt. 

The motion for the adoption of the 
reoort was then nut and carried. 

WAS OUT OF SODA. 

Tom Ricker kept a country store 
in Shapleigh, Me., years ago. He was 
constitutionally tired ; hated to move 
unless it was absolutely necessary. 
One Summer afternoon, when he was 
enjoying a nap in his old armchair, 
his head tilted back against a pile of 
grain bags, a customer came in. 

"I want a package of washing soda, 
Tom," she said. 

"Haven't any," the proprietor 
drawled, as he stretched his arms and 
rubbed his eyes. 

The customer looked along the top 
shelf, where he had generally kept his 
washing soda packages. 

"Why, yes, you have, Thomas. I 
see a package of soda up there on the 
top shelf," said she. 

The trader yawned again, and, still 
holding down his comfortable seat, 
replied : 

"Yes, I know they's one package 
there, but it's the last I've got in 
stock, and, yer see, I don't want ter 
git entirely out er sody." 

Then he resumed his nap, and the 
exasperated customer left. 



"Say, you oughtn't to push me so 
about that account. I really am 
short." 

"Yes, but why should you be short 
so long ?" 

"How often do you kill people on 
this line ?" asked a nervous passen- 
ger of a trolley car conductor one 
day. 

"Only once, sir," replied the con- 
ductor. 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE CLERK'S 
COLUMN 



GETS BETTER TRAINING. 

A merchant of Ion;; experience re- 
cently said that the clerk in the 
country store gets a better train- 
ing than the clerk in a city store. 
This is true in many other lines of en- 
deavor. In the small town, or the small 
city, the young man learning the busi- 
ness has the opportunity to learn all 
sides and all features of it. In the city 
institution he usually learns but a part 
of it. In the first case his experience is 
well rounded. In the other it is lop- 
sided. The young man . who learns the 
country store and its business thorough- 
ly is better equipped to win success on 
his own hook later on. 

There are many features and many 
sides to any business. The city clerk 
who gets but one side naturally grows 
more and more lop-sided the longer he 
stays at it, unless he can find some op- 
portunity to branch into a one-line store 
or become the hired manager of some de- 
partment. But when it comes to start- 
ing in business for himself his opportuni- 
ties are limited, while the opportunities 
for a clerk well trained in a country 
store are much broader. 

If the editor, to-day, were to begin 
his career over again he would select 
some country store, doing a good busi- 
ness and carrying several good lines. 
There is where the best experience is to 
be found. 



SUGGESTIONS FOR SALESMEN. 

A man who has faith in what he is 
trying to sell is a hundred per cent, 
better salesman than one who has not. 
Pick out good machines and tools and 
your conscience will be perfectly free in 
all you say about them. 

Tool cabinets are a good line to push. 
One city retailer makes a specialty of 
these at this season of the year, and al- 
ways sells a lot of them. They appeal 
to every man and every boy and can be 
sold at almost any price, depending on 
the number of tools. One that retails 
about $3.50 is a good seller usually. 

If you want to sell a razor or two 
take the pains to get the names of all 
young men just approaching or who have 
just arrived at the "shaving age." Send 
them circulars about your razors and if 
you don't land one or more of them it 
will be because they "haven't the 
price." Try it and see. 

Wrap up your nails so that the pack- 
age will not break. The extra cost of 
good paper is as nothing when compared 
with a satisfied customer. 



A TIP TO THE CLERK. 

Helping the clerks with, helpful 
suggestions in the right way is one 
of the important duties of the pro- 
prietor. An enterprising merchant 
offers this : "It frequently happens 
that in going around the store I 
will hear some clerk in talking to a cus- 
tomer make a foolish or, at least, an 
unnecessary statement. Of such I make 
a mental note, saying nothing at the 
time. Shortly thereafter I call all the 



Free of charge 




JAN 24 190ft 



ree of #g^ 



At 



These Excellent Show Cases can be obtained free of charge with the 
purchase of J. A. Henckel's Leading Razors. 

Just drop a postal card to your jobber or direct to us and we will tell you 
how you can procure one. 



F. W. Lamplough & Co., 



Montreal 



is 




The WHITE Brand 

Two Styles — "Standard Page," and "Page Empire." 

Double strength Wire; coiled for elasticity; Wire is not injured at joints; 
joints cannot slip; best galvanizing; all painted. 3,290,000 rods in use". 
Fences supplied in two weights — medium and extra heavy. 

All Fences painted WHITE— Our Brand 

THE PAGE WIRE FENCE CO., Limited, WALKERVILLE, Ont. 

Branches— Montreal, Toronto, St. John. 402 

'PAGE FENCES WEAR BEST" 



clerks together, bring up the incident— 
of course, without mentioning names, 
and in many cases so changing things 
around that the clerk cannot be quite 
certain whether I am hitting at him or 
not— and explain why the procedure was 
foolish 



department and Mr. Davis will have a 
free hand to display his accomplish- 
ments. 



A NEW PUBLICITY MANAGER. 

The Canadian Rand Drill Company, 
Montreal, has grown extensively during 
the last few years and as a supplement- 
ary evidence of this later development 
has established a publicity department 
and placed J. W. Davis in charge. Mr. 
Davis is a young man who has practical- 
ly grown up with the company and has 
had a thorough training. New ideas and 
new energy will be applied to a needed 

37 



BELGIAN NAIL SYNDICATE. 

A syndicate composed of fourteen of 
the most important nail manufacturers 
in Belgium has been organized to exist 
for five years, one of the first acts of 
the new body being to advance prices 
$1.15 for 220 pounds (100 kilos). 



Live in the present with a watchful 
eve on the future. 

Trouble postponed always has to be 
met with accrued interest. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



HONESTY AN ASSET. 

The following interesting article on 
honest v appeared recently in World's 
Work :' 

"In Scotland when a man has arrived 
at years oi discretion and has won a 
reputation for capability a hank will, 
siniph on his note, backed only by Iris 
character** advance him sufficient money 
{usually a moderate sum) to start in 
business. This is considered — and the 
conclusion is based on results — to be a 
good risk. In large cities, New York 
and Chicago, for example, business is 
not so frequently conducted in that waj 
but there is no doubt that our great 
in country owes much of its won- 
derful growth to those far-sighted coun- 
try hankers who realized that the bor- 
rower's character was the chief asset to 
he considered. Naturally, character 
plays a relatively larger part in the 
loaning operations of a small bank than 
in a large hank, in a country bank than 
in a Wall street hank, and in the begin- 
ning ( f a business man's career. Its 
relative importance is a matter of en- 
vironment. 

* *■ 

"In 1895 a New York firm of mer- 
chants became heavily involved in enter- 
prises that were sound but in which the 
realization of cash was slow. The head 
of the house informed the representa- 
tives of the banks that they would be 
obliged to 'carry the firm' through its 
difficulties or there would be a failure, 
when the banks would be heavy losers. 
The banks agreed that this was so, 
and assumed the burden. In the ensuing 
investigation it appeared that the head 
of the house, in securing loans, had 
omitled certain facts that indicated a 
lack ( f frankness, we will say. Six 
years later that same man was elected 
president of a newly formed industrial 
corporation or trust. It appeared in 
the money market as a large borrower. 
There was no reason why the accommo- 
dation should not be granted, until a 
particular banker was attracted by the 
signature of the president, when he re- 
called the episode < f 1895. The final re- 
sult was that the bankers informed the 
directors of the corporation that they 
could only have the credit desired when 
another president was elected. A flaw 
in that man's character cost him the 
presidency of this particular corpora- 
tion. 

* 

A mining promoter, a man with a 
charming personality, endeavored to 
float a valuable mine several years ago 
m Wall street. He failed to do so. An- 
other man took up the work where he 
left oft" and succeeded. Asked why he 
failed, he said bitterly : 

' 'Personally I am honest. Some years 
ago T had the misfortune to be asso- 
ciated with a man who accumulated his 
money out of a questionable trade. I 
was said to he his adviser and confi- 
dential man. No one would trust him, 
and now I lin I that everyone is reluc- 
tant to trust me. I am a "nice fellow, 
but" — and then I fall down. A good 
reputation would have been worth a 
fortune to me in the last few years.' 



"One of the most successiul Wall 
' bank presidents was invited upon 
one occasion to become a paitner in a 
private banking firm. The opportunities 
for money making were very great. lie 
thought it over and was favorably dis- 



Advertising that Draws Trade 




THE advertising aid we give out agent not only draws new 
trade to him, but it retains old friends and business. We 
work heartily for the building up of every line he carries 
and we have a sincere interest in his success. 

This is one reason why The Sherwin-Williams Paint Agency 
means so much to the agent who has it. It. means that he handles 
the best paint made and sold ; the most widely advertised paint — 
the paint that wins and holds the confidence of his trade, and it 
means that he has back of him a company with forty years of ex- 
perience in making and selling paint and that they are constantly 
working with him and for him. It means that he has the paint 
trade of his locality and that he need not fear competition. It 
means good profits and best quality always. In short, The Sherwin- 
Williams Paint Agency means the greatest success attainable in 
paint selling. Write us about it today. 

£|77/£ Sherwin-Williams Company 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

Headquarters and Plant i 639 Centre Street, Montreal. 

Warehouses : 86 York St., Toronto; 147 Bannatyne St., E., Winnipeg, , 53 , 



posed toward the proposition. He con- 
sulted a friend. 

" 'But,' said the friend, 'a man of 
your character could not get along with 
(mentioning a member of the firm). 
Why ? He's tricky.' 

"Two years later the firm in question 
dissolved, and the tricky partner retir- 
ed, hut he had impaired the standing of 
the house. 

"The same banker was offered $25,000 
to become a director of an industrial 
company that appeared to be, and was, 
financially sound. 

" 'Your duties,' said the lawyer mak- 
ing the offer, 'will be only nominal. We 
simply want your name.' 

"The bankQf concluded that he could 
not afford to be associated with the 
other men of the board. Surelv the 
character of this man is a very tangi- 
ble credit asset. 

"A Swede walked up to the president 
of a western bank and said : 

Ay tank Ay want to borrow $5,- 
000, and Ay tank Ay get him here.' 

"Cross-examined, it was ascertained 
that he had no money except a few bun- 
dle. I dollars, but he wanted to buy a 
mill. He was honest, a hard worker 

38 



and a good trader. The banker liked 
him so well that he was willing to back 
his own judgment, and so loaned the 
Swede ti e money he needed. The bor- 
rower made good and became one of the 
most useful citizens of that community. 
* * * 

"There are ten thousand business men 
in New Ydr'i who to-morrow might lose 
every penny they possessed and yet on 
I he day following they would start new 
careers, full of courage and confidence, 
bacl.ed by the seeminglv intangible but 
very definite assets — brains, health, and, 
most important, good character." 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE—~. 

Prompt Shipmsnt 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited. 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOUNDRY AND METAL 
INDUSTRIES 



An explosion in the blast furnace of 
the Algcrca Steel Co., Saull Sic. Marie, 
a week aso, killed one man and injured 
two othdrs. 

The Wellington Colliery Co., Victoria, 
B.C., are tc commence boring operations 
on a new discovery of coal near Parks- 
\ ill*', not far frnm Xanaimo. 

Legislation will be introduced at tin 
coming session of the Ontario Legisla- 
ture for the purpose of securing tile 
refining in Ontario of all nickel produc- 
ed in the province. 

The Canada Foundry Co. have re- 
cently secured a large contract for the 
superstruction of Frederic-ton highway 
bridge. It is said that nearly 300 tons 
of steel will be required on the installa- 
tion, and that it will be completed 
early in the Spring-. 

The Rothschilds have taken a trial 
shipment of Cobalt ore for their smel- 
ters in England. They are considered 
the largest smelters of precious metals 
in the world and their purchasing of 
Cobalt ore should mean much to that 
camp. The Government is considering 
the advisability of erecting- sampling 
works .il Cobalt, for the convenience id' 
miners. This has been done in seven 
westeii' stales, and provides a useful 
check on the reduction plants. Warn- 
ings are being issued againsl the dangers 
of "wild-cat" mining: schemes Boated 
on the strength of the mining boom at 
Cobalt this Spring. There is plenty of 
,-apilal available to develop these mines, 
but the inrush of prospectors will pro 
vide an opportunity for speculators. 

The re- "lit strike of rich cobalt ores 
in Ontario has drawn attention to the 
fail that similar ores arc found in the 
Kootenays, and eastern capitalists now 
1 in) use to prospecl further for this 
metal in British Columbia. Until recent- 
ly, the only mines producing cobalt to 
any extent, were those in New Caledonia, 
Norway, and Sudbury, the annual total 
produi! being in the neighborhood of 
three to four hundred tons. Up to 
the present, cobalt has been mainly 
used as a paint and for chemical work. 
but new uses are being found for it. and 

as the price has dropped considerably 

within the last year, a greater demand 
is iikdv to develop very shortly. Ores 
containing this metal are known to exist 
in paying craantities at Creston and Foil 
Steele in Easl Kootenay, and also i.i the 
Similkau ecu. Nickel is another metal 
that ureal demands are being made for. 
[ii British Columbia it is widely dissem- 
inated, usually not being found • ich 
( noi>"li to be treated for the metal -ih 0€. 
During the lasl 12 months experts have 
been sent to prosped and examine this 
class of ore in British Columbia. whilst 
a eompanv has been formed in the State 
of Washington to exploit the various 
known bodies of nickel in that state. 



INGOT METALS 

Tin—" Straits " and " L & F " 
LeaCf— Best English 
Copper— Lake and Casting 
Spelter— 1 ' V M " and Ordinary 

Antimony— Cooksons 

From Stock or for Import to wholesale 
buyers only. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

MONTREAL. 



Jeseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iroi* 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleablt 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, H> 
draulic and other Machinery where great strengiti 
is r quiied : Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundr> 
Purposes. 



a 



MIDLAND 



JJ 



BRAND. 



Foundry Pig Iron, 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Pries to Sales Agents 

Orummond, McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND. ONT 



Limited 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., umm 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S 

Manufacturers of » " 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMBNS-MARTIH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Important to Babbitt Users 



\Vh\ pay for a name? Bo up-to-date and 
Our babbitt made according to your 
own Formula, or if you have no formula send 
a sample ol' what you arc using and we "ill 
quote you price on same quality. All form- 
ulas made fcQ order* 

Long Distance Telephone Main 4315 



CANADA SMELTING CO. 

Limited 

standard Babbitt Metal, Phosphor Tin, 
Needle Metal, Type Metal, Etc, 

Cor. Brennan and Ann Sts., MONTREAL 



IN COMPETITION 

with other brands 

B. C. BRAND 
DRILL STEEL 

More than holds its own. That is why miners ask 
for it. Do you keep a stock ? 

Secure particulars from 

D. W. CLARK, Canadian Representative, 
P.O. Box 521, Toronto, Can. 

E. C. PRIOR & CO., Agents, Victoria, B.C., 

BAINES & PECKOVER, Agents, Toronto, Can. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

B. K. MORTON & CO. 

SHEFFIELD, ENC. 



OAKEYS 



The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery, 6d. and Is. Canister* 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN 0AKEY& SONS, Limited 

Manufacturers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Clothi and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, Lonflon, Knjjani 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, - 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



ASK YOUR CUSTOMERS 

if they don't need new 
pumps. If they do, sell 
them our 

Standard 
Anti-Freezing Pumps 

They'll appreciate get- 
ting a pump that doesn't 
have to be thawn out 
every zero morning 



— McDougall Pump« 
—Made in Canada. 




Write for Catalogue and Prices- 

THE R. McDOUGALL CO., LIMITED 
Gait, Ont. 



39 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



January 20, 1906 



LEAD MINING IN CANADA. 
A resume of the conditions surround- 
ing the lead mining and refining indus- 
try in Canada has been prepared by G. 
O. Buchanan. Government inspector un- 
der the Bounties Act, and published in 
British Columbia papers. According to 
Mr. Buchanan the production of lead 
in British Columbia during 1905 was 
as follows : 

Hall Mining & Smelting Co., 
Nelson 17,785,862 

Canadian Smelting Works, 
Trail 12,754,901 

Other mines 11 .200,169 

Exported in ore to Europe ...15,52 

57,272,767 

Equal to .' 28,036 tons 

Output. 1004 20,000 tons 

Increase 8,636 tons 

Except for the blank in shipments 
from the St. Eugene, caused by damage 
to their works by fire, (the months of 
October and November having been 
practically lost) the output for 1905 
'would have gone close to that of the 
banner year 1900, which was 31.679 
tons. 

For the fiscal year ending June 30. 
1905. the returns to the department of 
trade and commerce for bounty pur- 
poses shows as follows : 

Lead delivered to B. C. smel- 
ters, pounds 33,704,932 

Exported to Europe, pounds.21, 972,999 

Total 55,676,931 

Equal to 27,838 tons 

Bountv on home smelted 

lead' $240,058.71 

Exported lead 97,157.30 

$337,216.01 

For the year endine June 30, 1904, 
the fiernres were : Lead nroduction. 13,- 
397 tons; bountv earned. $195,283.90. 

On November 29, 1904. lead was 
emoted in London at £12 12s 6d., and 
the rate of bountv payable was reduc- 
ed, the rate of diminution being 1.3579 
cents per 100 pounds of lead for each 
advance of one shilling and three- 
nence above £12 10s. The whole boun- 
ty being wiped out by 57 of such ad- 
vances. 

The price went to £13 3s 9d. on 
January 7, fell to £11 17s fid. on 
March 3. rose to £12 lis 3d. on Anril 
4. and from that time has steadily 
climbed: £16 was reached on November 
29. and the extinction of bounty pay- 
ments for the time being was accom- 
plished. 

The extremes or variation for the 
last five years have been : 1900, Sep- 
tember 15. £18 : 1902, January 14, £10 
5s: 1903, March 12. £13 15s; August 
16. £10 18s; 1905, December 12, £17 
8s 9d. 

That lead will remain permanently 
above £16 is not to be expected, but. it 
is probable that we have seen the last 
of £12 lead. The predominant influence 
of the American Smelting & Refining 
Company, not so much in favor of an 
extremely high price, is beginning to be 
internationally felt, and there is be- 
vond that universal testimony to the 
fact that the legitimate demand for 
lead has overtaken the supply, that the 
demand is growing and bound to grow, 



lllillllllllllllllllll 



Either Way You Look At It 

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than the Iver Johnson 



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more simple and perfect — a device that means safety, 

without any "ifs" or "buts" about it. The 

Iver Johnson 

REVOLVERS 



need not be handled carefully; 
with chambers fully loaded, 
drop it on the floor, hammer 
the hamma — it can't possibly 
go off unless you deliberately 
pull the trigger. 

Iver Johnson Revolvers are for 

sale at all dealers. 
Hammer, $6.50 Hammerless, S7.80 
Write for our bright little 
booklet, "Shots" and complete 
catalogue, free. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works 



F1TCHBURG, 



llll 



and the sources of fresh supplies are 
not in sight. 

Of our home smelted product the 
electrolytic refinery at Trail is now 
treating 50 tons per day, or at the rate 
of 18,000 tons per annum. At the 
present moment the refinery is busy 
with orders for Canadian consumption, 
and it is probable that we can count 
the Canadian market as good for, from 
this time onwards, 18,000 tons per an- 
num. 

The year has introduced an era in 
the provision of lead smelting facilities. 
In the early Spring the Sullivan Com- 
pany's new smelter went into blast at 
Marysville in East Kootenay. This 
smeiter has two stacks of a capacity of 
100 tons per day each, only one of 
which is yet in operation. The com- 
pany has also installed as a part of 
their plant a Huntington-Heberlien out- 
fit of ovens and pots for ore roasting. 
The smelter has run almost continu- 
ously, with no ore supply except that 
afforded by their own mine. At both 
the Hall mines and Trail smelters sim- 
ilar roasting plants are under erection. 

The Hendryx smelter at Pilot Bay, 
after eight years of idleness, is under- 
going renovation at the hands of the 
Canada Metal Company, and it is an- 
nounced, that the lead stack there will 
soon be in commission. This company 
has almost completed at Frank, Alta., 
a massive establishment for the treat- 
ment of zinc ores, and proposes to also 
establish a lead stack a,t Frank. This 
multiplication of smelters and introduc- 
tion of metallurgical economics, should 
certainly foreshadow better treatment 
rates for the producer at an early day. 

40 



Some profitable disposition of the in- 
creasing quantities of zinc ore develop- 
ed in connection with lead mining in 
the Slocan and Ainsworth camps had 
become the most serious problem con- 
fronting the mine owners. The prob- 
lem has been attacked from all sides by 
local enterprise in the installation of 
separating plants by foreign capital in 
the erection of the magnificent works 
at Frank, and by commission of in- 
quiry under the direction of the most 
eminent living specialists employed by 
the Dominion Government. Extensive 
works for the corrosion of lead were 
established during the year in Mont- 
real by the Carter White Lead Com- 
pany. The contract for their supply of 
pig lead for a term of years is held by 
the refinery at Trail. Their method of 
corrosion is new and improved, and 
this, coupled with the perfect freedom 
from adulteration of the lead from 
Trail, has enabled them to put upon the 
market a high grade of paint lead. The 
works are rushed with orders, and their 
requirements of raw material accord- 
ingly increased. 

At the Tariff Commissioners' sitting 
in Nelson in September interested par- 
ties were heard upon the subject of an 
increase in the duty upon other lead 
products (including pig) the Govern- 
ment having the prospect of a grateful 
relief in the matter of lead bounty pay- 
ments for the current fiscal year. Un- 
der the dwindling rates at which boun- 
ty has been payable since July 1, the 
earnings have been kept down to about 
$80,000, and should lead remain above 
£16 until June 30, the surplus will be 
larger by $420,000 than was expected. 



January 20, 1906 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



HARDWARE MERCHANTS 



LIMITED 



•"* , 138-140 WEST FRONT STREET, TORONTO wh °iT ,e 

WholesaU wniy 



AMERICAN COLUMBIA "TRENTON" ANVILS 




RETURNED 
JAN n 1906 



High Grade. 



Solid Wrought. 



Weight from 50 to 175 lbi. 



The Anvils are forged in two pieces and welded at the waist. The Face is one solid piece, made of a special grade of the finest Tool Steel. 

The makers have recently made improvements in the design of this Anvil, which enables them to offer to the Trade an Anvil very much superior 
in shape to any that has ever been put upon the market. The opinions of innumerable Horseshoers and Blacksmiths testify to that. 

It has a base that does not require "strapping down" will set firm without "shifting" or "rooking" and combines'a most practica 
and graceful Shape with the least amount of weight attained. I 

This is an Anvil, that, combined with the best material and workmanship, stands unequalled for superior shape, graoeful design, stability 
on the block, and the absence of superfluous weight in the Base. 






RITURi 

22 1906 





SILVER'S PORTABLE FORGES 

with and without hood. 



"INDIAN CHIEF" VISE 

Bolid Box. Weight 35 to 70 lbs. High Grade. 



FOR POST DRILLS, PROSPECTOR ANVILS, PARELLEL VISES, SEE OUR CATALOGUE 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED 



Our Prioee Are Right 



GRAHAM NAIL8 ARE THE BE8T 

Factory : Dufferin 8treet, Toronto. 
41 



We Ship Promptly. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 




PAINT AND OIL TRADE IN J 905. 



Speaking generally, the year just clos- 
ed proved to be the greatest in the his- 
tory of Canada, so far as the paint 
trade in concerned. There is scarcely a 
paint manufacturing plant in the coun- 
try that lias not been compelled to ex- 
tend its premises and increase its facili- 
ties in order to cope with the phenome- 
nal demand. 

Nor do we need to look far to find an 
explanation of this most satisfactory 
condition, for the paint situation, as is 
well known, depends very materially up- 
on the extent of building operations, and 
19U5 was an exceptional year for con- 
struction work everywhere. It is due 
to these causes that the paint manufac- 
turers were called upon to supply such 
tremendous quantities last year, and it 
is upon the genuinely healthy conditions 
that they base their optimistic forecasts 
for 1906." 

A general review of the trade would 
be quite incomplete without some refer- 
ence to the splendid manner in which 
dealers have met their obligations, and 
in more cases than usual taken their dis- 
counts. The losses through bad debts 
were, perhaps, the smallest in the his- 
tory of the trade. 

Turpentine. 

At the beginning of last year turpen- 
tine was quoted in Montreal at 78 
cents, single barrels, and in Toronto at 
75 cents, but since that time prices have 
ruled much higher. The production dur- 
ing 1905 was comparatively short, ow- 
ing to scarcity of labor in the pine belts 
and the inclination on the part of tur- 
pentine producers to curtail it. The 
labor situation is still one that causes 
some anxiety to producers, as to future 
results, though this is not considered an 
altogether uumixed evil, as there is a 
growing feeling among both producers 
and exporters* that the supply should be 
kept well within the consumptive de- 
mand. Under the circumstances it is es- 
timated that the shortage for 1906 will 
be about ten per cent., as compared 
with the production of previous years. 
Turpentine -aw a number of fluctuations 
in value during the year, but the ten- 
dency was, for the most part, upward. 
The Irtgh water mark was reached in 
i he middle of November, when the price 
quoted was 98 cents in Montreal and $1 
in Toronto. The end of the year dis- 
played a somewhat weaker condition, 
both .Montreal and Toronto quotations 
being five cents under the November fig- 
ures. 

White Lead. 

One of the most interesting phases of 
the trade has been Hie situation in white 
lead. In the last Canadian tariff revi- 
sion a heavy duty was put on dry white 
lead coming into Canada, this being 
done to protect the Carter White Lead 
pany, who were establishing works 
in Montreal to supply the Canadian mar- 
ket. Grinders were given notice of this 
change and a date was set, after which 
no foreign lead might be imported with- 



out paying the duty. It is said that 
the majoritj of Canadian grinders took 
advantage of this warning to order suf- 
ficient quantities to last them, as they 
supposed, a considerable time. The de- 
mand was so great, however, that they 
soon found themselves applying to the 
Carter White Lead Co. for supplies. 
These latter, having been .delayed in the 
construction of their- additional capacity 
by petty strikes among the builders, 
have been unable to make shipments in 
accordance with their contracts. Of the 
many contractors employed upon their 
building only two completed their work 
within the specified time, while all oth- 
ers have been behind from one week to 
two or three months. In consequence of 
this, steps were taken as soon as it was 
seen that early deliveries were impossi- 
ble, to increase the capacity of the plant 
to -1,000 tons a year, more than they 
expect to sell for some time. This en- 
tire capacity has been brought to bear 
upon furnishing lead for the Spring de- 
mand. After this has been supplied the 
additional capacity \vill be idle until the 
growth of the Canadian trade brings it 
into demand. So far, the company have 
delivered about 1,100 tons, but they ex- 



pect in February to have a monthly 
capacity of 700 tons, which should be 
increased in March to 900 tons. 

Linseed Oil. 

In January, 1905, the ruling prices 
were lie for raw and 47c for boiled, 
prices having been so low in the preced- 
ing Fall that the Canadian crushers 
closed their mills as the oil could be im- 
ported from England, crushed from the 
tremendous crop of Argentine and In- 
dian seed, cheaper than it could be pro- 
duced here. Consequently thd flaxseed 
grown in Canada was allowed to he ex- 
ported to the United Stales and the oil 
for the entire season imported from 
England. Prices gradually picked up 
and during the Summer from June to 
September the ruling figures were about 
56c to 59c. As soon as the Canadian 
mills could crush seed, however, they 
put their stock upon the market and 
from October to the end of the year- 
raw oil could he bought for from 46c to 
50c, with boiled 3c higher, these low 
figures shutting off imports from Eng- 
land where the market was gradually 
strengthening. The situation at the 
beginning of 1906 is that a scarcity of 
seed is reported from India and quota- 

(Coniinucd on page 45 ) 



f 

I 
I 

i 

i 

* 



Out for Spring Business j 

Our travellers will solicit your 
orders some time before opening 
of Spring Trade. Wait for their 

proposition. Hollywood, Elasti- 
lite, Orolite, Mangolite, Greni- 
tine, IN. L Varnish Stain and 

Coach Enamel are old standards 
worthy of consideration. 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Company 

TORONTO, Ontario, Canada 



Limited 



42 



January 20, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



SUPERFIN 



COLORS IN Oil- 



F"inely Ground i r-» Refined Linseed Oil 

The natural pigments used in our Colors in Oil are the purest, strongest and finest obtainahle, the chemical colors 
are all of the best manufacture and are guaranteed to be chemically pure. 

Now, Mr. Dealer, are you carrying the guaranteed goods ? Don't you think you would have a larger trade if you 
bought from the house whose Motto is: "The excellence of our Product the first consideration?" 

CATALOGUE SENT ON REQUEST 



THE STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH WORKS CO., Limited, Windsor, ont. 




Ledgers 

Monthly Account 
Systems 

Invoicing Systems 

Statement System 



In fact any system you want— 
we can assist you. 

Our travellers will call on you, 
by telephoning to any of our 
agencies. 

If there is no agency in your 
city, write us. 



The RollaL Grain Co. 

LIMITED 

OTTAWA, Canada 



TOK0N70 OFFICE 
MONTREAL OFFICE 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



18 Toronto St. 
74 Alliance Bitlg. 
Schofield Bros. 
- Sylvester-Willson Bldg 
White & Bindon 



Mention this Paper. 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Manufacturers 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGHGRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES 

MONTREAL. 



Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 



are unequalled for cutting and wearing, qualities. 



To be obta'ned from the 
principal Hardware 
Dealers and Glass 



Merchants. 



A g «t. for Canada: A Ramsay & Son Company, Montreal 




Raw Unseed 
Boiled Linseed 
Pale Boiled Linseed 
Pale Refined Linseed 



'DOMINION'' 
BRAND 

OILS GUARANTEED GENUINE. 



Canadian Agents— 
J. A. BERNARD, 

21 St. Peter Street., Quebec 
HOMER TAYLOR, 
Temple Bldg., Montreal 



FRED'K FENNER &. CO., LTD. 

PENINSULAR HOUSE, MONUMENT ST., E.C 

LONDON, ENGLAND. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 




Ahead of all others in quality and workmanship. If sparks of fine quality, set 
by experts, are what you require, buy Diamonds of A. Shaw & Son's make. 
Canadian Agant 

OODF-REV S. PELTON 

388 ST. PAUL ST.. MONTREAL 



Will Hold Up a Shelf! 

That's what a ahelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Bet- 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



43 




fRlE^rS CLIPPERS* I 

■ J ^' Tourt,U»nd, tiectrie Powell ff 

, ARE THE BEST. 4 f 

Highest yuality (jroomlng and %.-^# 
Sheep-Shearing Machine!. 

WEMAKETHEM. MSi 

SXNTJ FOR CATALOOtH! TO •■•W 

inrliu Shearer Iff. Co., Xaifeu, H.H..CSA 

Wiebusch ft Hilger, Limited special New. York 
re;»re<entatives, 9-15 Murray Street 




Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 




Paint economy, like economy in 
other lines, depends upon getting 
good value for your money. 

Anchor and 
English Liquid 
Paints 

we know to be the best value 
obtainable in paint. 
They are perfect paints. There 
is nothing used in their manu- 
facture but the purest pigments, 
linseed oil, turpentine, dryers, 
and the world's best white lead — 
BRANDRAM'S B. B. GENU- 
INE. 





Manufactured by 

HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited 

HALIFAX and ST. JOHN 

HENDERSON & POTTS CO., 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



QUEBEC. 

Ortuv of Hardware and Mktal, 
232 McGiU Street, 

Montreal. January 19, 1906. 

The week just past has been notable 
for a sharp advance in Paris green, 
which has gone up with a rush, in con- 
sequence of advances in the essential 
chemicals. The Canadian manufactur- 
ers have been forced to advance their 
prices 3 cents per pound, and it is likely 
that imported Paris greens will have to 
follow suit next week. 

Linseed oil has received an impetus, 
owing to a flow of cables from the Old 
Country, announlcing higher prices 
there. Authentic reports indicate a 
scarcity of seed for the coming season, 
and indications are that still higher- 
prices will be reached before many days 
have passed. 

The white lead situation is becoming 
serious. Many grinders who had con- 
tracted for drv white lead for December 
delivery, have not yet received their 
shipments, and fear is expressed that 
they will not be able to fill Spring or- 
ders on time. The corroders are doing 
their utmost to hasten the construction 
work in their plant, and are charging 
new cylinders daily. They are being held 
back, however, by strikes among car- 
penters and others engaged in_ the work 
of construction, and are unable to give 
much encouragement to their customers, 
who are clamorino- for deliveries. Once 
the Spring demand has been satisfied, 
they will have the situation well in 
hand, as their monthly capacity, by that 
time, will be maintained at 900 tons. 

General business, in the province, is 
"good in spots," some items experienc- 
ing good inquiry, while others are some- 
what sluggish. White lead, Paris green, 
linseed oil, and vermillions, are the most 
active lines on the market. 

Linseed Oil— Prices have advanced 5 
cents, owing to reports of a scarce crop. 
We quote as follows: Raw. one to four 
barrels, 57c; five to nine barrels, 56c; 
boiled, one to four barrels, 60c; five to 
nine barrels, 59c, f.o.b., Montreal, net 
30 days. 

Turpentine— In spite of expectations, 
a further decline of lc has been regis- 
tered this week. We quote the follow- 
in- nrices: Single barrel, 92c. per gallon. 
Two barrels or over, 91c. For smaller 
quantities than barrel, 5c extra per 
gallon is charged. Standard gallon is 
8.40 lbs. fio.b. point of shipment, net 
30 days. 

Ground White Lead— We quote as 
follows : Best brand ' Government 
standards, $6.00 to $6.05; No. 1, $5.65 to 
$5.80; No. 2, $5.30 to $5.55; No. 3, $5.05 
to $5.30; all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— We quote: Barrels, 

44 



$5.40; 100 lb. packages, $5.65; 6 to 10 
lb. tins, $6.65. 

Dry White Zinc— Our prices are as 
follows: Red seal, 7o. to 8c; French 
V. M., 6c to 7c; Lehigh, 5c to 6c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil) —We quote 
as follows : Pure, 8c. to 9c ; No. 1, 6 
l-2c to 7 l-2c; No. 2, 5 l-4c. to 6 l-4c 

Putty— Our quotations are: Pure lin- 
seed oil, $1.75 to $1.85; bulk in barrels, 
$1.50; in 25-lb. irons, $1.80; in tins, 
$1.90; bladdered putty in barrels, $1.75. 

Ora/nge Mineral— We give the follow- 
ing prices : Casks, 7 l-4c ; 100-Lb. kegs, 
7 l-2c; smaller quantities, 8 l-2c 

Red Lead— We are still quoting as 
follows: Genuine red lead in casks, $5.00 
to $5.25; in 100-lb. kegs, $5.25; in less 
quantities at the rate of $6.00 per 100 
lbs.; No. 1 red lead, casks, $4.75; kegs, 
$5.00, and smaller quantities, $5.75. 

Gum Shellac — We still quote: Fine 
orange, 55c. per lb.; med. orange, 50c 
per lb.; bleached shellac (white), 60c 
per lb. 

Paris Green— Advances have been de- 
clared on the Canadian products. We 
now quote : C.P. Co 's pure Paris green : 
Barrels, 600 lbs., 17 l-4c ; kegs, 250 lbs., 
17 l-2c; drums, 50 lbs., 18c; drums, 25 
lbs., 18 l-2c; 1-lb. packets, 100 lbs. in 
case, 19c; 1-lb. packets, 50 lbs. in case, 
19 l-2c. ; 1-2 lb. packets, 100 lbs. in case, 
21c; 1-lb. tins, 100 lbs. in case, 20c 
Berger's English: Barrels, 600 lbs., 15 
3-4c ; kegs, 250 lbs., 16e. ; drums, 25 lbs., 
17c; drums, 50 lbs. and 100 lbs., 16 l-2c; 
1-lb. packets, 17 l-2c; 1-lb. tins, 18 
l-2c; 1-2 lb. packages, 20 l-2c. per lb. 
Terms, 2 per cent, off, 30 days. 

Shellac Varnish— We quote as follows : 
$2.50 to $2.60; pure orange, $2.40 to 
$2.50; No. 1 orange, $2.35 to $2.45. 

Mixed Paints— We quote from $1.20 to 
$1.40 per gallon. 

Castor Oil— Advances have been 
steady of late. The scarcity of castor 
beans, will still further raise prices. We 
are quoting: Firsts, in cases 8 l-2c, in 
barrels 8c, seconds, in cases 8c, in bar- 
rels 7 l-2c 

Refined Petroleum— We still quote: 
American water white, 16 l-2c and 17 
l-2c; Canadian prime white, 14 l-2c 
'and 15 l-2c; 18 l-2c. and 19 l-2c. ex 
warehouse. 

Window Glass— Booking for Spring 
delivery is going on actively. The de- 
mand will be very large, from present 
indications. Our quotations are as 
follows : First break, 50 tfeet, 
$2.10; second break, $2.20; first break, 
100 feet, $4.25; third break, 100 feet. 
$4.75; fourth break, 100 feet, $5; fifth 
break, 100 feet, $5.25; sixth break, 100 
feet, $5.75; seventh break, 100 feet. 
$6.25; eie-hth break, 100 feet. $6.50. Dia- 
mond star, first break, 50 feet, $2.30; 
second break, 50 feet, $2.50; first break, 



January 20, 1906 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



100 feet, $4.40; second do., $4.80; third 
do., $5.75; fourth do., $6.50; fifth do.. 
$7.50; sixth do., $8, and seventh do., $9. 
Double thick, first break, 50 feet, $3.45; 
second break, $3.75; first break, 100 feet, 
$6.75; second do., $7.25; third do., $8.75; 
fourth do., $10; fifth do., $11.50; sixth 
do., $12.50; seventh do., $14; eighth do., 
$16.50; ninth do., $18; tenth do., $20; 
eleventh do., $24.00, and twelfth do.. 
$28.50. 

ONTARIO. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street East, 

Toronto, Jan 20, 1906 

Canadian Paris green has made a sen- 
sational jump of 3c, owing to conditions 
in the primary markets, and while .the 
English figures remain unchanged, it is 
considered only a question of days as 
to when the English article will follow 
the rise in the Canadian article. 

White lead is very scarce, and some 
paint manufacturers have none what- 
ever in stock, supplies bought before 
the duty was imposed last Fall, having 
been cleaned out by the heavy demand 
during the past few months. Orders 
placed with the corroding works in Mont- 
real, for delivery last Summer, have not 
yet been filled, but the higher -price now 
ruling will compensate buyers somewhat. 
The fear of a shortage when the Spring- 
demand becomes active is, however, caus- 
ing some talk of a request for a suspen- 
sion of the duty in order to secure goods 
the Canadian c-orroders are unable to 
supply. All this tends to make the mar- 
ket stiff. 

Linseed oil continues very firm, and 
some dealers are quoting as high as 62c. 
for single barrels of raw. The English 
market is undoubtedly very strong, but 
we are still quoting 60c. as the /ruling 
price. Some buyers are refusing to pay 
these high maces, and trade is not so 
brisk. Turpentine continues at 97e. for 
single barcels. 

White Lead — Ex Toronto, pure white, 
$6.05; No. 1, $5.67 1-2: No. 2, $5,30: 
No. 3, $5.05; No. 4, $4.80 in packages of 
25 lbs. and upwards; l-2c. per lb. extra 
will be charged for 12 1-2 lb. packages: 
genuine dry white lead, in casks, $5.40. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 5G0 
lbs.. $5.(10, ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., 
$5.50; No. ], in casks of'500 lbs., $4.75: 
ditto, in kegs of 100 lbs., $5.25. 

Dry White Zinc— In casks, 7c, in 100 
lbs., 7 l-2c. ; No. 1, in casks 6c, in 100 
lbs. 6 l-2c 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— In 25- 
lb. irons, 8c, in 12 1-2 lbs, 8 l-2c. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gallon lots, 75c to 
90c. per callon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1.00 per 100 lbs. 

Whiting— 60c. to 65c per 100 lbs.-. 
Gilders' whiting, 75c. 

Paris Green (for 1906)— We quote 
as follows: Canadian Govenment Stand- 
and: Barrels, 600 lbs., 18 l-4c ; kegs, 
250 lbs.. 18 l-2c: 50-lb. and 100-lb. 
drums, 19c; 25-lb. drums, 19 l-2c : 1-lb. 
iSackets, 20c; 1-lb. tins, 21c; 1-2 lb. 
packages, 22c. Berger's English: 600 
11). barrels, 15 3-4c; 250-lb. kegs, 16c; 
50 and 100-lb. drums, 16 l-2c ; 25-lb. 



drums, 17c; 1-lb. packets, 17 l-2c; 1-lb. 
tins, IS l-2c; 1-2 lb. packets, 20 l-2e. 
per pound. Terms, 2 per cent, off on 
Berger's English. 

Shellac Varnish — Pure orange in 
bane's, $2.80; white, $2.90 per barrel; 
No. 1 (orange), $2.25. 

Linseed Oil — Our quotations are: Rjaw, 
1 to 4 barrels, 60c; 5 to 9 barrels, 59c; 
boiled, 1 to 1 barrels, 63c; 5 to 9 barrels, 
62c. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
GueHlph, net 30 days. Advance of 2c 
for delivery to outside points. 

Turpentine— Sin-le barrel lots, 97c 
f.o.b., point of shipment, net 
thirty days. For less quantities 
than barrels, 5c per gallon extra will be 
added, and for 5-gallon packages, 50c, 
and 10-gallon packages, 80c. will be 
charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb. bar- 
rels, 5 to 25c. per lb.; cabinet glue, in 
barrels, 11 l-2c to 12c; emery glue, in 
barrels, 15c; bookbinders' -round, 11 
l-2c: finest American white, 19c; No. 1 
American white, 15c per lb. 

Putty — Ordinary, bladders in barrels, 
$1.80: pure linseed oil, $2.00 to $2.10; 
bulk in 800-lb. casks, $1.50; pure, $1.95 
to $2.00; 100-lb. kegs. 25c extra. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2.00 
per barrel. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.35 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 70c to 80c 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1.00. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 8 l-2c 
to 9c per lb., and 10c for single tins. 

Refined Petroleum— Trade continues 
normal. We quote: Canadian prime 
white, 14c; water white, 16c; American 
water white, 16c to 18c. ex warehouse. 

Crude Petroleum — Prices continue un- 
changed. jWe ouote: Canadian, $1.36; 
Pennsylvania, $1.61; Ohio, 94c. 

PAINT AND OIL TRADE IN 1905. 
(Continued from page 42) 

tions in England and Canada have al- 
ready advanced about 10 cents, and the 
indications are .that prices will go much 
higher during the year. About 300,000 
to 400,000 bushels of flaxseed have been 
harvested in Canada in 1905 and as the 
crushers use about 2,000,000 bushels the 
balance will be imported from the West- 
ern States via Duluth. 

Window Glass. 

One of the most serious situations of 
the year was that developed in the win- 
dow glass market. As is well known, 
Canada's chief bases of supply are Eng- 
land and Belgium. In both these coun- 
tries the production of window glass 
has been greatly handicapped, owing to 
persistent labor troubles. Occasional 
agreements would start the works going 
for a time, only to be followed by a 
long period of inaction on the outbreak 
of further trouble. So acute did the 
situation become that Canadian imnor- 
ters were unable to take orders for 1905 
delivery after the month of July. 
Throughout the year glass was extreme- 
ly hard to obtain, and prices were con- 
sequently high, with an ever-present up- 
ward tendency. 

45 



THE 

CANADA 
PAINT 
COMPANY 



MAKERS 



TORONTO 




F0R SUPERIOR 
AND RELIABLE 
VARNISHES 
AND JAPANS 



THE 

CANADA 
PAINT 
COMPANY 

MAKERS 

MONTREAL 



Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 



NOVELTIES FOR THE HARDWAREMAN 



and illustrations will be furnished on 
application. Mention Hardware and 
Metal when making the request. 



TRIPLE SCREW DRIVER. 
Russell & Kiwin Mfg. Company. \rv. 
Britain, Cum., and New York, arc 
offering the triple screw driver illustral 
ed in the accompanying cut. It is 
made by the .lames Swan Company, 




ACME BALL BEARING JACK. 

We herewith illustrate the new Acme 
hall bearing jack, which is intended for 
light or extreme heavy loads. One very 
strong feature is their ratchet brake, 
which is said to make it impossible to 



LOOK 




Vandegrift Wrench. 

THE VANDEGRIFT WRENCH. 

The Smith & Hemenway Co., New 
York, have taken up the sale of the 




and designed especially for automobile 
and machinists' use. The side blades 
allow additional leverage in setting and 
taking out screws and also permit tak- 
ing out or inserting screws very close 
to or underneath projections. 



PULLMAN FOLDING COAT HANGER 

Pullman Mfg. Company, Rochester, 
N.Y., manufacturers of hardware 
specialties, are putting on the market a 
new folding- coat hanger, illustrated 
herewith. It is made of best grade cold 
rolled Bessemer steel stock, with heavy 
coats of copper and nickel plate, and is 
highly polished. Besides being designed 
oats and waists it has an eye to 
receive a Pullman trousers or skirt 
hanger, as shown in Fig. 1, making a 
combination hanger which will hold a 
whole suit at the popular price of 25c. 
In Fig. 2 is shown the hanger folded 
for packing in trunk or grip, while Fjg. 
3 shows the neat display box in whicli 
it is put up for the trade. The folding 
feature makes the article especially de- 
sirable for traveling-, as it can be fold- 
ed into very small space. The Can- 
adian firms handling the Pullman in- 



WE DRIVE THEM ALL 



Triple Screw Driver. 

drop the load when in use. The jack 
has been tested on some very severe 
loads, such as 100,000 pound capacity 
cars and heavy bridge work, and has 




Acme Ball-Bearing Jack. 

been pronounced one of the most suc- 
cessful of any jack heretofore offered to 
the trade. One man with a 20 j in. lever 
can raise a 100, 000-pound capacity car. 




Vandegrift wrench, which is herewith 
illustrated. 

The large increase in this company's 
business has forced them to build larger 
quarters since their fire, and in rear- 
ranging their factory they brought out 
a knife handle wrench in conjunction 
with their special Vandegrift screw 
wrench. 

Prices and illustrations will be fur- 
nished to the trade on request. 



USEFUL YEAR EOOK. 

"Surety Sayings" is the title of a 
convenient red cloth-bound year book, 
issued by the United States Fidelity & 
Guaranty Company, of Baltimore, Md., 
for which A. E. Kirkpatrick is Canadian 
manager with office at G Colborne 
street, Toronto. The book provides a 
blank page for every day of the year at 
the top of which appears a quotation ; 
each quotation makes a pointed allusion 
to the surety business. Occasionally a. 




Fig. 3. — Folding Coat Hangers, in Display Box. 




Fig. 1.— Folding Coat Hanger with Trousers Hanger Attached. 



Fig. 2. — Pullman Coat Hanger, Folded. 



elude Rice Lewis & Son, Toronto; Cav- 
erhill, Learmont & Co., and I 
Bros, & Co., Montreal. 



This article will be sold by the Smith 
& Hemenway Co., New York, and will 
be made in six different sizes. Prices 

46 



cartoon is inserted with the same ob- 
ject. The book is about as clever a pro- 
duction in its line as could be imagined. 



January 20, 1906 



Hardware and Metal 




START A STOVE SELLING CAMPAIGN NOW 



You should now be ready to begin the 
Spring campaign on stoves — no, call it 
the mid-winter campaign, although you 
really should be lookin"' up Spring busi- 
ness right now. If you follow the fol- 
lowing plan outlined by the Hardware 
Trade you will be working- up Spring 
trade and at the same time cleaning up 
on Winter lines. How to go about it? 

Tn place of the long- line of heaters 
that you have had out since early in 
the Fall, you will want a little differ- 
ent assortment. 

For one thing-, you will want to get 
a cook stove and a range or two on 
exhibition now. You want to get the 
trade to thinking about your line of 
ranges and cooks so when the buying be- 
gins in the Spring they will think of 
your store. 

To that end take out a part of your 
heaters and put them in the storeroom. 
In their place put one of the best 
ranges that you sell. If it is a large 
one beautifully trimmed and with all 
appliances and attachments it will be 
all the better. It should be something 
that will attract attention. 

While you may not sell any cooks for 
two months yet, it is not too early to 
exhibit them. This is going on the sup- 
position that you always have on hand 
a few ranges and cooks. Of course you 
have not received your Spring lines yet, 
but the old ones will do very well. In 
addition to the range put out a cook or 
two, also of the highest price. When 
your customers come on they will notice 
them, and you and your clerks can cas- 
ually call the attention of the customers 
to the stove. If you have received a 
new sample' of the 1905 line you can 
call attention to that fact through the 
weekly advertisement or by some other 
means. However, it is a little early to 
begin to pound the trade on this line. 
It will become monotonous. What you 
want now is merely to have a reminder 
in the store that you sell cooks and 
ranges as well as heaters and other 
things. 

Never too Late to Sell Heaters. 

But don't throw out all the heaters. 
Put a few of the slow sellers forward 
in a good position and mark them 
"$19.50— was $25," or whatever the case 
may be. These you can well advertise 
all the time. As noted, it is never too 
late to sell a heating stove. The wea- 
ther may turn so cold yet that addition- 
al stoves will be needed or some of the 
old standbys that were expected to last 
through the Winter may give out, so you 
never can tell when the end of the heater 
trade is at hand. 

But the idea now is to begin gradual- 
ly on the cooks and ranges and work 
them into the most prominent place in- 
side of sixty days. 

Then get out your mailing list — of 
course you have one. Go over it care- 
fully and pick out names of people that 



you think are at all likely to buy a 
heater yet this Winter. To them send 
a strong letter calling attention to the 
stoves that you have left, describing 
them and giving the lowest price. It 
may be that you will find but twenty- 
five or fifty to whom you think it will 
be useful to send these letters— but that 
will be all right. If one of them buys a 
stove you will have gotten your money 
back. 

Then begin to prepare your list for the 
cook and range trade. Get the names of 
all the new settlers in the country round 
about and in town. Go to the land men 
and they can tell you the names of a 
good many actual or prospective settlers 
— if not just now before a great while. 

Get your list in good shape, and if 
you address your envelopes by hand, put 
in the dull days in the store getting sev- 
eral sets of them ready. Put stamps 
on, too, if they are not already stamped. 

If you prepare your own stove adver- 
tising matter you can write to the man- 
ufacturers for cuts to use in your ads 
and your circulars, and you will then 
have everything ready to send out the 
advertising matter just as soon as it is 
time. 

It will not be a bad idea to plan a 
series of ads, though, whenever you have 
time. But that can be left until you 
get your cuts, your prices on the new 
stoves and all the particulars of them. 

It is not easy at the beginning of a 
year to sit down and figure out just 
how much you are going to spend in 
your store advertising and how you are 
going to spend it. Changes may be ne- 
cessary in your plans as you travel 
along through the year, so you can only 
outline things in a general way. 

A Card Discount Sale. 

If you have a good many more heat- 
ing stoves on your floor than you want 
you can inaugurate a card discount sale. 
To do this have a lot of cards printed 
with some such wording as this : 

"This card entitles to a 

discount of twenty-five per cent, on any 
heating stove bought for cash out of 
our stock on or before the first of Feb- 
ruary, 1906. This card is not transfer- 
able and is of no value if presented by 
any other than the person named hereon 
or if presented after February 1, 1906. 



'No. 



"Jones & Smith Hardware Co." 

These cards should be sent to all your 
cash customers and as many more as 
you think can bring the cash. 

Then advertise the sale and stick to 
the terms. Do not give the discount to 
anyone that hasn't the card and do not 
shove vour prices up for the occasion. 
Make the holder of the card present it in 
person and impress upon him the value 
of the card. This may not result in a 
grand rush to your store but it may 
help you to sell two or three or four of 

47 

\ 



the stoves that you would otherwise 
have had to carry until next Fall. If it 
does it will have paid. 



CAST IRON HEATING STOVES. 

When the oak stove was received gen- 
erally by the trade many dealers ex- 
pressed the opinion that it would soon 
supplant the old style cast iron parlor 
stove. They argued that the changed 
construction and its general usefulness 
in being adapted to almost any form of 
fuel would soon lead to the oak stove 
supplanting- the older forms. This was 
in a great measure true. The public 
quickly took up the idea, buying the 
oak stove on account of its simple ar- 
rangement, its heating capacity, the 
ease with which the firing was done, 
and so on. Now, or for a year at am 
rate, dealers have begun to complain 
regarding the increased cost of oak 
stoves. Thev say in no uncertain tone 
that the original popularity of the oak 
stove was due to its simplicity, and 
that when the stove became encumbered 
with nickel ring-s, fancv urns, nickel- 
nlated foot rests, as well as magazine 
feeders and base heating- attachment, 
the mice was increased to such an ex- 
tent that the users were unwilling to 
nav for ornamentation and uninvited 
improvements. Ag-ain. the dealers 
claim a reduced heating- capacity, due 
to skirting- around the fire pot. This 
Fall the complaint became louder. Cast 
iron stoves, they explained, were in 
much greater demand than for a num- 
ber of years past, and thev held that 
the oak stove was praeticallv the only 
drag on the market, thoug-h such was 
the general demand for heating- stoves 
that these, too. were eag-erlv boug-ht bv 
dealers who had not the forethong-ht to 
order heavv supnlies earlier in the sea- 
son. It mav be that the cast iron 
stove is reg-aininp- favor because of the 
increased prosperity of the countrv, as 
at the nresent time it is a matter of 
hut $5 or ."RIO whether the user pur- 
chases a east iron base heating- stove 
or one of the hig-h nrice oak stoves. 
There seems to be no ohiection on the 
part of dealers to the oak stove excent 
in the matter of price and surplus 
ornamentation. They arg-ue that its 
first form was the best, but that with 
the later improvements the designs 
have so far denarted from the originals 
that manv onk stoves now strike them 
as monstrosities. — Metal Worker. 



REVERSIBLE DRAFT SYSTEM. 

Cornelius Roell, of Independence. 
Missouri, has been granted a patent on 
a hot air furnace with a reversible 
draft. He has entered into negotiations 
for its manufacture and promises to 
place the furnace on the market in the 
near future. 



COMPANY EXPANDING. 

The Record Foundry Co.. Moncton. 
N.B.. which has been gradually trashing 
its wares into the markets of Western 
Canada, has, with the beginning- of the 
vear, reorganized the staffs in Mont- 
real. Toronto and western towns, with 
a view to further increase business in 
that direction. Seven of the staff in 
the head office have been transferred to 
Montreal, Toronto and the west. 



Hardware and Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



January 20, 1906 



CONSUMERS WANT FREE TIN. 
Vt t ho Tariff Commission's session at 
St John, N.B., a weelt ago, J. Sutton 

Clark, of St. George, asked that tin 
plates be U-ft on the tree list. He call- 
ed attention to the I'aet that Welsh tin 
was much superior to the A.merican 
article ami spoke of the large quantity 
used in Canada in the various canning 
The competition was very 
keen and an increase of duty would 
greath increase the cost of production 
1 various canned goods. In reply to 
some question of Hon. Rlr. . Fielding, 
Mr Clark gave the commission some 
information regarding the machinery 
used in the manufacture of cans. 

lames Pender, of the Maritime Nail 
Works described the conditions sur- 
rounding the wire industry, and said 
while wire manufacturers are satisfied 
with the tariff as it at present exists, 
we at the same time think that it would 
be advantageous to Canada and the 
people in the steel and wire business it 
the wires DOW free namely, barbed wire 
of all kinds and plain galvanized wires 
No 9 12 and 13, should be dutiable to 
the same extent as other wires now on 
the twentv per cent, dutiable list. And 
if this duty were imposed in the way 
we would suggest, we are convinced that 
the price would not be advanced but a 
very small amount, if any. We are con- 
firmed in this oninion by the results ot 
several years' experience in the wire 
nail business, the price of which, tor 
several years, had been only a small 
amount hig-her than the cost in Frtts- 
bur-fr with the freight added. These re- 
sults were brought about by competi- 
tion between domestic manufacturers ot 
wire nails. We are convinced that simi- 
lar results would follow the imposition 
of a duty on barbed wire for the same 
reasons. 

John Keeffe. of the James Robertson 
Co Limited,, and Secretary E. A. 
Everett of the Hardware Importers, 
also appeared, the latter reading- a 
number of articles on which objection 
was made on paving duty. Linseed oil 
was taken as an instance. The great 
fluctuation in the price of this article 
made the oavment of an entrv duty ex- 
cessive. The- never knew just what the 
price was going to be and the dutv was 
often paid on a considerable higher list 
price than what the same article mierht 
be worth at time of its actual require- 
ment Thev were also bpnosed to the 
dutv on tin plates, as it placed the can 
manufacturers at a disadvantage. 

\ resolution passed by the Hardware 
Association favoring the British prefer- 
ence onlv when goods are brought in 
through Canadian ports was passed. 
The hardware men also asked for a re- 
duction on window glass and cotton 

waste. 

U the meeting of the Commission at 
Sydney, the Nova Scotia Steel & Coal 
Co., and the Dominion Coal Co., called 
the attention of the Commission to the 
importance of the coal industry to 
Nova Scotia. Last year the output of 
the province was 5,247,135 tons, the 
mining of which gave employment to 
11 650 person*, yielding a royalty to the 
local Government of $517,513. The sales 
to the Province of Quebec in 1904 were 
] 730,948 tons, and this year they will 
not be less. The coal companies., owing 
to long rail haul and position on the 
board, are vitally dependent on the 
Lawrence market, which includes 



the eitv of Montreal and west. Compe 
tition at these points, with both Am 
erican and English coal, had been keen 
felt. It was considered absolutely 
accessary that the present dut\ of sixty 
cents per gross ton on bituminous be 
maintained in order to hold the market 
for Nova Scotia coal, and thereby fur- 
nish employment for a large population. 
Without this duty the production would 
1),- reduced one-half. The exports of 
coal from Nova Scotia to the I nited 
State- consist almost wholly of slack 
coal, on which there is a duty of 15 
cents, and other grades are practically 
shut out. of the New England market by 
a duty of 67c. The persistent efforts 
which have been made during the past 
four years to find foreign markets have 
not resulted in regular business, al- 
though trial cargoes have been sent to 
various countries. Efforts have also 
been made to find markets west of 
Montreal, but owing to the keen com- 
petition of American coal, with the ex- 
isting duty, it has been found impossible 
to establish trade in that direction. 



SEALED TENDERS addressed to the undersigned 
and endorsed " Tender for Hamilton Wharf," will 
be received at this office up to and including February 5, 
1906, inclusively, for the construction of a wharf in the 
City of Hamilton, Wentworth County, Out., according 
to a plan and specification to be seen at the office of J. 
G. Sing, Esq., Resident Engineer, Confederation Life 
Building, Toronto, on application to the Postmaster of 
Hamilton, Ont., and at the Department of Public- 
Works, Ottawa. 

Tenders will not be considered unless made on the 
printed form supplied, and signed with the actual signa- 
tures of tenderers. 

An accepted cheque on a chartered bank, payable to the 
order of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, 
for eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00), must accompany 
each tender. The cheque will be forfeited if the party 
tendering decline the contract or fail to complete the 
work contracted for, and will be returned in case of non- 
acceptance of tender. 

The Department does not bind itself to accept the 
lowest or any tender. 

By order, 

FRED. GELINAS, 

Secretary. 
Department of Public Works, 

Ottawa, December 16, 1905. 
Newspapers inserting this advertisement without 
authority from the Department will not be paid for 
t. (3)" 

E. T. WRIGHT & CO. 

HAMILTON, ONI. 




CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 

Advertisements under this heading, Zc. a word first 
insertion ; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (a 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittances to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlooked. 
Advertisements received without rem'ttance cannot be 
acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 

SITUATIONS WANTED. 

ENGLISHMAN, exceptional Canadian and 
Briibh experience; capable reliable worker ; 
hardware office or store; used to managing work- 
ing busiress. 1 aimer, 122 McGill, Toronto, 
Ontario. [52-2] 



MILK CANS, 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS, 
SAP BUCKETS, 
SAP SPOUTS, 

DAIRY PAILS, 

STRAINERPAILS.etc. 

48 



BY experienced hardware salesman, either as 
salesman or traveler for hardware specialties, 
paints or o Is; energetic salesman ; good references. 
Box 237 Hardware and Metal. [3] 



YOUNG man with eleven years practical 
experience in hardware business desires 
position ts traveler; Ai references. Box 235, 
Hardware and Metal. [3] 

TRAVELLING sale.-man wanted to handle a 
well-known line of stoves and hot air furnaces 
in Ontario; state experience. Box 501, HARD- 
WARE and Metal. [2] 



SUPERINTENDENT WANTED. 



FIRST-CLASS man to take full management of 
Furnace and Stove plant ; would prefer if he 
would take a financial interest in the business, 
which will bear the closest of investigation. Ad- 
dress Room "C" Confederation Life Building, 
Toronto. [52- 2] 



FOR SALE. 



HARDW* RE business in good town, surrounded 
by best farming country in Canada. Stock 
$5,0 o; turn-over$25,rooperanrium. Good profits. 
Reason for selling, dissolution of partnership. 
Address Box 139, Hardware and Metal. [4] 

HAR DWARE business, thriving town in Western 
Ontario. Wiite at once; Box 483, Essex, 
Ont. [2] 

PART set of tinsmith tools in good shape; will 
sell cheap. Apply to Box 500, HARDWARE 
and Metal. [<j] 



OR SALE 



GROWING hardware and fun iture business in 
1 o-a-head Western Manitoba town ; invest- 
ment of slightly over three thousand, less than 
three years ago, will show at the end of th rd year 
surplus about twelve thousand ; owner retiring ; 
this will soon go. Apply quick t > Box 236, 
Hardware and Metal 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 

WANTED linsmith, good all-aro' nd man. 
Yearly job Must be temperate. Single 
man preferred. State wages and experi»-rce. 
Porteous Br> s., Carlyle, Sask. [4] 

BUSINESS CHANCES. 

FOR SALE— '2.0CO stock s oves and tinware in 
the best market town in Ontario; natural gas 
forfu<-l. Turnover $1 8, 000; good charce for quick 
buyers Ill-health the cause for selling. C J. 
Werner, Dunnville, Ont. [4] 

FOR SALE— Hardware and stoves, $5300; 
population, 3,800; one opposition. Box 502, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. [4] 



January 20, 1906 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal 




crease your business for l'JOfi. 
had the chance to buy 



GET 
RIGHT 



Is your business, a 
Growing Business 1 ? If 
not there is something 
wrong. We are offering 
you the opportunity of 
your Life Time to in- 
Never before have you 



A Malleable and Steel Range 

made in Canada. Are you aware of the superiority of 
this construction over otheis? If not, a request will bring 
particulars. If you are, remember "procrastination" 
works into the hands of yeur competitor. 

Joy Manufacturing Co. 

32 William Ave., Toronto 



Stove that is Needed 
i tB-ie Stove to Sell. 




THE EMPIRE 
QUEEN 
RANGE 



Is replete with 
Kood points. The 
Firebox isperfectly 
proportioned to 
the size of the 
oven, fitted with 
the latest duplex 
grates and heavy 
sectional cast iron ' 
linings for coal 
and separate grate 
for wood. 
The Empire Queen Range is constructed to produce perfect 
baking. The heat is spread uniformly on all sides of the oven. 

The Empire Queen Range is easy to clean. The ash-pit is especi- 
ally deep, and the flues are made on the most modern principles. 
The Empire Queen (range is the stove that is needed. Sell it ! 
Write for Booklet. 

The Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 

OWEN SOUND, Ontario Llmit °<^ 

THE CHRISTIE BROS. CO., Limited, 238 King St., Winnipeg, Man. 
Western Agents. 

THE CANADA STOVE AND FURNITURE CO., 126 West Craig St., 
Montreal. Que., Agents for the Province of Quebec. 



"Samson" Milk Can Trimmings. 




Section of Samson" Milk Can Bottom. 



Strongest, neatest, most sanitary 
and only one-piece bottom made. 



Has no seams or rivets to corrode and collect dirt. 

Every bottom in each size is of an exact diameter. Being stamped out 
with a die — not spun — there can be no variation as in a bottom made in 
several pieces. 

Requires less solder and work in putting together than pieced bottoms — 
also wears longer. 

Th© McClary Manufacturing Oo. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG), VANCOUVER, ST. JOHN, N.B. HAMILTON 

"Everything for -trie Tinshop." 

49 



Hardware and Metal 



STO V ES AND TINWARE 



January 20, 1906 



WHY NOT? 



Are you using all the means at hand to make your business a success? Wise dealers take advantage of our system- 
atic, aggressive and universal advertising and stock goods always in demand. 

The individual dealer may not advertise much. Make our advertising help you. Place the 

Imperial Oxford Range 

on your floor. As a practical man you know the Imperial Oxford is the hand- 
somest and best range in Canada. It rivets the buyer's attention completely, 
it keeps making the purchasing suggestion while you explain its exclusive 
features, and, in a few moments, the sale is made. 

Our patented diffusive oven flue, exclusive to the Imperial Oxford, maintains 
a steady, even temperature. 

Repairs can be easily effected without disturbing the linings by means of 
our Draw-out Duplex Grate. 

But you know about the many exclusive features which go to make the 
Imperial Oxford superior. 

Dealers should not forget that their customers, too, know much about these 
exclusive features from the experience of satisfied friends and neighbors, and by 
reading our advertisements. 

The Imperial Oxford means fuel economy, cooking perfection, satisfied 
customers and more trade for you. 
Our guarantee bond goes with every range. 

Write for Catalogue 61. 

\A/E also manufacture Steel Plate Ranges, Gas Stoves, Ranges and Heaters. Hotel Ranges and complete Hotel Kitchen Outfits, Hot Water 
** and Steam Boilers and Radiators, Warm Air Furnaces and all kinds of Cooking and Heating Apparatus, Plumbers' Supplies. 

The Gurney Foundry Company, Limited 




TORONTO 

The Gurney-Massey Co., Limited, Montreal, Que. 



WINNIPEG 



VANCOUVER 



Xi 



The Gurney Standard Metal Co., Limited, Calgary, Alta. 



Grimsby, Ont., Jan. i, 1906. 
To the Trade : 

In extending to you our very best wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year, we 
trust the past year has yielded both pleasure and profit and that the experience gained will 
enable you better than ever to push onward to the goal of success. 

For our customers of 1905 we have the most kindly feeling. We appreciate their 
favors and kindnesses and most sincerely hope to have a continuation of same. 

On the other hand, added facilities and new lines will enable us to serve you better than 
ever and to care for those new customers which we earnestly hope to secure. 

For 1906 we call your attention to 

Walker Stoves and Ranges 

" SUCCESSFUL EVERYWHERE " 

and wish to say that all our experience, energy and time will be devoted to making 
good this motto. 

Sincerely yours, 

The Walker Steel Range Company, u«««i 

Grimsby, Ont. 



50 



January 20, 1906 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



Hardware and Metal 




" VICTORIA " IMPROVED 
COAL GRATE 

24^x30%. Dump Grate. Double Damper 



"MADE IN CANADA" 

Take note of it. In your next 
order specify 

Mantel 
Coal Grates 



finished in Oxidized Copper, Brass 
or Dull Black. 

Mantel Ooal Grates are fast winning 
favor. 

Wouldn't you like to sell them ? 



Whittaker Stove Works 

WINDSOR, ONT. 



A BRIGHT STORE 

PLEASES YOUR CUSTOMERS 
ATTRACTS BUSINESS 
SAVES TIME 

A modern Acetylene plant will light your 
store perfectly and economically. Ask 
us about it. 



THE CONTINENTAL HEAT & LIGHT CO. 



MONTREAL 



Chances for Business 



In these days of prosperity large 
public buildings are constantly being 
planned in all parts of the country. 

These are your chances for getting 
business. 

Good air is a necessity in all build- 
ings, but more especially in those built 
for public use. 

The best way to get good air is by 
the use of our 

AEOLIAN VENTILATORS 

They have been tried all over 
Canada, and have never failed to give 
complete satisfaction. 

Montreal, June loth. 1903 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Co., Limited, Montreal. 
Dear Sirs, 
In answer to your request, we take very much 
pleasure in saying that we have your system of ven- 
tilation installed in our Church for several years and 
it has given us entire satisfaction. 

Fre. Marie Raymond, O. F. M. 

Write us for terms. 

THE J. W. HARRIS COMPANY, LIMITED 

Contractors Montreal 



*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ $>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦'< 

The New 

National Oak 

HeaLer 

For Hard or Soft Coal, Lignite, Coke or Wood 

Smoke consuming. Double Heater from floor. 
Duplex Grates. Double Mica Door. Straight, Deep 
Firepot. Deep Reflector Ring. Hot Blast Ring is 
entirely outside — does not obstruct interior. Smoke 
Pipe Collar is in rear of double-heating collar. No 
Elbows or Offsets required to connect with double- 
heating flue. 





Mad* only by 



the MOFFAT STOVE CO., limited 



WINNIPEG 



WESTON, ONT. 



CALGARY 



No other manufacturer in the world has a stove just like 
this. In brief, it's the biggest, tallest and best stove of its kind ever 
offered. Places you absolutely beyond competition. Seize the oppor- 
tunity and write for the agency to-day. 



Hardware and Metal 



January 20, 1906 



Consolidated 

Plate 

Glass 

Company 

of Canada 

Limited 



WINDOW 



GLASS 



PLATE 

GLASS 



TORONTO 

MONTREAL 

OTTAWA 

LONDON 

WINNIPEG 



Building and Industrial News 

H IS i>v> ARE AND Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source building and industrial news 
of any sort, the formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, 
factories, foundries or other works, railway or mining news. All correspondence will be 
treated as confidential when desired. 



J. W. Young is proposing to estab- 
lish a fertilizer factory in Toronto. 

The Eagle Spinning Mills Company 
are to establish a large plant at Ham- 
ilton. 

Keenan Bros, will extend their wood- 
euware factory at Uvven Sound at a 
cost of $2o,»00. 

A beet sugar plant is proposed at 
Chatham, Ont., to be financed by Am- 
erican capitalists. 

The Niagara Engine Works are to be 
put into operation shortly. Orders for 
30 engines are on hand. 

The International Silver Company, 
Welland, are installing considerable new 
macninery and electric equipment. 

The Climax Road Machinery Co., com- 
posed of American capitalists, may 
establish a Canadian factory at Guelph. 

Mcinnes & Lyons have established a 
planing mill at Edmonton, in connection 
with their large saw mills near that 
city. 

Work on the big power plant at Fort 
Frances is progressing favorably, and 
it is announced that a pulp mill will be 
built there. 

The Miramichi Lumber Co. will estab- 
lish a mill at Chatham, ^i.B. The 
plant and building will cost $50,000, 
and 00 men will be employed. 

The Restigouche Woodworking Co. 
have completed the construction of a 
farge woodworking plant at Dalhousie. 
the plant is said to be the most mod- 
ern in New Brunswick. 

Plans for the new Canadian Northern 
Railway shop to be built in Winnipeg 
have been completed, it is estimated 
that the cost of the work* will be be- 
tween $000,000 and $800,000. 

The Canadian Northern Railroad will 
spend $2,000,000; orders placed embrac- 
ing 400 box, 400 flat, and 50 stock cars, 
30 coaches, 10 baggage cars, ?' sleepers 
and diners, and 44 locomotives. 

It is announced that the Canadian 
Northern Railroad will build a road to 
skirt the north shore of Lake Superior, 
connecting their lines in Manitoba with 
their lines east of Georgian Bay. 

The British Columbia Electric Rail- 
way Company have placed orders for 
electric machinery and equipment worth 
$125,000, to be used in enlargements of 
their power plant near Vancouver. 

The N. B. Electrical Power Co., St. 
John, intend to establish a large elec- 
trical power plant at Aroostook Falls, 
and will have it in working shape be- 
fore the Grand Falls plant is in opera- 
tion. 

The Lake Superior Box Company, 
West Superior, Michigan, have pur- 
chased a site in Winnipeg and intend to 
erect a five-storey factory building. Ma- 
chinery to the value of $70,000 is to be 
installed. 

Prescott expects to secure electric 
power this Spring from the Ogdensburg 

52 



Light & Power Company, which secures 
its power at Hanuawa Falls, and in- 
tends to look for business on the Can- 
adian side this season. 

An electric expert has reported that 
there are from ' 12,000 to 13,000 horse- 
power to be generated, except in the dry 
season, at the power plant at Erindale, 
which was established with York Count 
ty Loan Company money. 

It is proposed to establish a steel 
billet mill in connection with the Port- 
land Rolling Mills at St. John, N.B. 
Such a plant would cost about $200,000 
to construct, and another $100,000 
would be required for its operation. 

The Maritime Coal & Railway Com- 
pany have decided to establish an elec- 
tric power plant at their mine, eight 
miles from Amherst, N.S., and an 
agreement has been entered into giving 
them the right to bring the power to 
Amherst and dispose of it for factory 
purpdses there. 

Western Canada is speculating on the 
probable move to be made by James J. 
Hill, the Canadian who has become a 
railway king in the United States. 
Rumors are rife regarding different pro- 
jects he is said to be considering to 
build railways into the Saskatchewan 
wheat districts. 

The Farrar Transportation Company 
at Collingwood have decided to build a 
9, 000-ton steel carrier for use on the 
Upper Lakes. The work will be done at 
the Collingwood ship yards, and the 
boat will be completed in the Spring of 
1907. It will be one of the largest 
Canadian vessels on fresh water.' 

A. B. Palmer, R. H. Palmer and 
Robt. Kelly, Vancouver, are applying 
for charters for three companies at 
Conrad City, on Lake Bennett, in the 
Yukon District. The Conrad Telephone, 
Water & Supply, and Electric & Pow- 
er Companies are the three, each being 
capitalized at $10,000. 

The White Sewing Machine Company, 
with headquarters at Cleveland, Ohio, 
are negotiating with the town of Wel- 
land for a site where they propose to 
establish a manufacturing plant in Can- 
ada. If the deal goes through they will 
secure certain advantages from the 
town and in return will employ 300 
workmen. 

A large factory for patented platform 
gear for lorries, wagons, and drays, is 
to be established at Gait, if arrange- 
ments are completed for a factory site 
there. The concern will do business un- 
der the name of the Gait Wagon Com- 
pany. The promoters have a factory in 
Indiana, but the Canadian tariff forces 
them to establish a factory in this 
country. 

The Canadian Consolidated Mines, To- 
ronto, have been incorporated by Do- 
minion charter, with a capitalization of 
$5,500,000. The incorporators include 
H. S. Osier, W. B. Raymond, E. Ford, 
J. M. Ewing, and Britton Osier, and the 



January 20, 1906 



BUILDING AND INDUSTRIAL NEWS 



Hardware and Metal 



company is organized for the purpose of 
amalgamating several successful mines 
at Rossland .with the Trail Smelter and 
the Rossland Power Company. 

The Henderson Roller Bearing Co. is 
to be wound up as a result of litiga- 
tion. Shareholders have entered ac- 
tions for recovery of money invested, 
and the affairs of the company are in a 
very unhappy state. D. Burke Simp- 
son, of Bowmanville, is president of 
the company; George F. Marter is vice- 
president, and among the directors are 
Messrs. Albert Ogden, Dr. John Fergu- 
son, A. E. Henderson, George Breeze, 
Elias Lemon, and Whitworth Anderson. 

Representatives of Nova Scotia indus- 
I tries appeared before the Tariff Commis- 
sion during their sessions in Nova Sco- 
tia and requested that the steel bounty 
be continued, and also protested against 
the reduction of present schedules. The 
Standard Drain Pipe Companv, New 
Glasgow, asked for a specific duty on 
certain kinds of sewer pipes, and the 
Humphrey Glass Company requested 
that glass molds be placed on the free 
list. I. Matheson & Co. asked for a 
reduction on certain kinds of corrugat- 
ed iron furnaces not made in Canada, 
and representatives of the N. S. Steel 
& Coal Company asked that the bounty 
of 1905 be continued for three years be- 
fore bringing into effect the reduction 
proposed in the present schedules. The 
Dominion Iron & Steel Company asked 
for a continuance of the bounty system, 
and also asked for duty on barbed and 
galvanized wire. 

Companies Incorporated. 

Fiddes & Hogarth, Toronto, have 
been incorporated with a share capital 
of $40,000, for the purpose of carrying 
on the business of plumbers, gas-fitters, 
etc. The directors are H. Hogarth, J. 
A. Doidge, and F. J. Hogarth, Jr., all 
of Toronto. 

The Conboy Carriage Co.,* Toronto, 
have been incorporated with a share 
capital of $100,000, for the purpose of 
manufacturing and dealing in wagons, 
etc. The directors are D. Conbov. W. 
C. Conbov. R. Webster and S. D.' Con- 
boy, all of Toronto. 

New York & Canadian Mining Co., 
Toronto, have been incorporated with 
a share capital of $40,000, for the pur- 
pose of carrying on the business of 
a mining, milline- and reduction com- 
panv. The directors are G. R. Geary, 
F. D. Byers, and 0. F. Taylor, all of 
Toronto. 

The Dwyer Mining Co., Toronto, has 
been incorporated with a share capital 
of $100,000, for the purpose of carrying 
on a mining, milling, reduction and de- 
velopment comnanv. The directors are 
John Brush LeRoy and J. R. Hum- 
phreys, Toronto, and D. R. Dwyers, 
Seattle Wash. 

The Sudburv Machine Shop & Foun- 
dry Co. have been incorporated with a 
share capital of $40,000, for the purpose 
of carrying on the business of mechani- 
cal engineers, machinists and foundry- 
men, the provisional directors being D. 
H. Haight and John Lawson, Copper 
Cliff: A. B. Gordon and L. O'Connor, 
Sudbury, and O. R. Smith, Victoria 
Mines. 

Camnbell & Tough Stock Scale Co.. 
Arnprior, have been incorporated with 



a share capital of $50,000, for the pur- 
pose of manufacturing and dealing in 
weighing machines, refrigerators, etc., 
and carrying on the business of wood- 
workers, machinists and founders. 
The directors are D. J. Campbell, Arn- 
prior; R. J. Tough, Toronto, and D. 
Craig, Renfrew. 

Dominion Brazing Co., Montreal, have 
been incorporated with a share capital 
of $100,000, for the purpose of carrying 
on a business of brazing, welding, sol- 
dering, repairing, etc., and to manufac- 
ture and deal in all goods used in con- 
nection therewith. The directors are 
A. Hendery and W. Eckenstein, of 
Montreal; H. L. Dinning, Lachine; C. 
Ralph, Longueuil, and C. A. Duclos, 
Westmount. 



IS IRON IN BUILDINGS UNSAFE? 

The collapse of the roof of the Charing 
Cross Station at London, England, is 
causing a serious discussion as to the 
advisability of the use of iron in modern 
buildings. A leading British architect, 
T. G. Jackson, in discussing the matter 
declares that iron construction is still 
on trial and that in many respects we 
have only reached the experimental 
stage. 

Mr. Jackson points out that the life 
of an iron structure exposed to the 
weather depends absolutely and solel